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Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

No major issues. Minor issues include the BIOS fan control being a little flaky at times, but I've moved my chassis fans to a commander pro so it's no longer an issue. Everything else is fine with it. The VRM seems fine as I've been running my 9900K at 5.1 GHz all cores for months now with no issues.

As far as it being worth it, I dunno. A big reason I went Asus was for the Aura lighting since I had committed to that ecosystem. If you don't care about that, there's other similarly priced boards from Gigabyte or others which are comparable in terms of features and performance.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Motherboard is fine. Overclocks and performs as expected and the VRM is nice and cool even at high load. My only complaint is that the fan control in the Asus BIOS is unreliable crap apparently, so I've subsequently purchased a Corsair Commander Pro to control all my case fans via Corsair Link which I was already using for my radiator intake fans.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

For the RGB halos I daisy chained 3 together and plugged them into each addressable RBG header. I think I got extension cables for this purpose so I could run it all behind. The top and rear are one group, and the fronts are another group.

For the fans themselves, I think I plugged the rear fan into chassis 1, the bottom fan into chassis 2, and both top fans (combined) into chassis 3. I used a y-splitter to combine the two top fans into a single cable.

For the CPU cooler it's plugged into the CPU_FAN header just as it says in the instructions. I'm using Corsair Link to control the fans, so the three front fans are all connected to the pump using the provided plugs. Then the pump is plugged into a USB header on your motherboard which is what gives you the ability to control the fans and pump with software, monitor the coolant temp, and so forth.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

850W will be fine, even with the overclocks I'm running. I initially was going to get a 750W which I later thought might have been cutting it a little close, and then ended up going to 1000W instead of 850W. Probably because of the models/availability/price or something. Under max load the CPU will eat a bit over 200W, GPU around 275-300W, and then another 50-75W or so for the rest. So anything 850W or higher should be fine and put you in the right place in the efficiency curve for the PSU.

No you don't NEED all those fans. However, I deliberately bought a high airflow case so I wanted to take advantage of that and ventilate it as well as possible. Also with more fans you can generally run them at lower speeds for less overall noise and the same thermal performance as a configuration with fewer fans running faster. You could probably eliminate the bottom fan and the forward-most top fan, but GPU temps will likely be a little higher as a result. The bottom fan helps push air right into the GPU. The second top fan doesn't do as much; it's mainly there to help keep airflow balanced. The more air you can exhaust, the easier it is for fresh air to get in.

Sure the monitor could be used as a TV. Though if that was my use case I'd probably look at getting an actual TV for use as a monitor, or getting one of those new large format monitors. Like I know there's been a few 40-50" big monitors released recently. They're generally more expensive than comparable TV's, but likely have better response/refresh, adaptive sync, etc... Also, while ultrawide is great for watching movies since it is a very similar wide aspect ratio (so no black bars on top/bottom), for TV you'll have black bars on the sides because it's too wide. For that you'd be better off with a standard 16:9 ratio TV or monitor.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point
  1. No. The Meshify C is a small/short case and the only opening in the PSU shroud that the fan can use is the removable hatch in the front. My PSU goes literally right up to within less than an inch of that bottom fan, and the bottom fan actually sits partly under the lower front fan which overhangs it a bit. The S2 is a much bigger case so you have more options. You could run the single bottom intake through the vent as you have in your image, but if it were me I'd remove the plate and put a second bottom intake right in the front like I have in my case as well. More airflow is better than less. Plus, the taller S2 case won't obstruct the bottom front fan as much as mine does. Also, you're almost certainly going to have to remove the hatch in the shroud in order to have any part of the front fans or radiator sticking down into the lower part of the case. For sure if you want 3x 140mm intakes.

  2. Well front intake is the best position thermally for a single AIO rad. Top exhaust isn't as efficient because you have warmer air going through the rad, and you'll have somewhat higher CPU temps. That, and it was the only place I could fit a 360mm rad. I wanted at least a 280, and the Meshify C will only fit at most a 240 on top. Again, the Meshify C is a small case so you're constrained to 120mm fans in most places.

  3. No, I think I'd still get the Meshify C. I like the small form factor for something on top of my desk. My only wish is that it were like an inch longer for more GPU/PSU/rad clearance, but the S2 cases are a lot bigger than that (and taller). That said, if I was gonna put it on the floor or had somewhere else with more space the S2 looks like a nice case. You can go 140mm for a lot of the fans which is nice, and it just has more room for everything so setup and cable management won't be as tricky.

If it were me building a Meshify S2 today I'd do the following:

  • 280mm front rad with 3x NF-A14 intakes
  • 2x NF-A14 bottom intakes with the shroud panel removed (if your PSU allows clearance for the second fan, otherwise just run the front one)
  • 2x NF-A14 top exhausts, in the rear-most positions
  • 1x NF-A14 rear exhaust

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

The backplate on the GPU has some little holes and slits in it, and I was able to slip the sensor in one of these so it's directly contacting the PCB right behind the GPU core (under the backplate). It's pretty accurate, but tends to actually read a few degrees higher than GPU core after sustained load for a while since the PCB and backplate retains heat. This isn't a bad thing though, since the point is to spin up the fans when it's warm and that's what it does. Works perfectly. If your backplate doesn't have access like this you could try the sensor on the backplate under the core, or if that's no good you could remove the backplate and run the sensor underneath before replacing the backplate.

I used Kryonaut on the CPU after cleaning off the paste that came on the 150i. I didn't repaste the GPU because it seems that this generation generally has good paste applications and my GPU temps don't really ever exceed 70C. I can't envision a repaste making it any better than that.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

It's a 2 TB 2.5 inch hybrid drive. There don't really make any 7200 RPM 2.5 inch drives with 2 TB or more. You have to get lower capacity if you want 7200 RPM, and since this was a data drive and I don't really care that much about speed I just got the 5400 RPM hybrid drive. It's perfectly fine as a data/storage drive.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes it will. The 1080ti SC/SC2 cards are basically the same length as the reference 2080/2080ti cards like the XC Ultra I have, in the neighborhood of 270mm. With a front radiator and fans in the Meshify you have room for about 285-290mm of GPU. The only ones that are longer than that are the top of the line models like the EVGA FTW3, ASUS STRIX, etc... Those all clock in at around 300mm or longer with their custom boards.

You can make the longer cards fit with the front rad/fans in a few ways if you need to. You can not use a middle fan. You can buy some Noctua NF-A12x15 thin fans and mount them outside the front of the chassis behind the dust filter (can also combine with the previous method to replace the missing middle fan). Or, you can mod the front cover/filter so there's clearance to fit full 25mm thick fans outside the front chassis.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

No they don't make the NF-A12 in black, at least not yet. It's a newer fan so they probably will eventually. I have those fans plugged into the AIO so they are controlled by the Corsair software. This is so I can setup the fans to spin based on coolant temperature. Works fine. As I said, I have them start to spin up as coolant temp rises through the 30's, though it never really gets high enough to get the fans past 50% or so.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I haven't, as I'm happy with the airflow/temps. I could see the top intake being beneficial in certain configs, but in my case I have 4 intake and 3 exhaust fans so if I turned 2 of those exhaust fans into intakes I wouldn't be able to get air out of my case and I'd have tons of positive pressure. If I had more options for exhaust fans in a different/larger case I'd probably consider a top intake, yes. Just not in this circumstance.

How do you mean "choking" the radiator? My rad is in the front with 3 intake fans pulling air through it, so having a balanced number of exhaust fans and close to neutral pressure in the case will improve airflow and make it easier for the intake fans to pull air in through the rad.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the XC Ultra, and it's also substantially overclocked (130/850 offsets atm). The heatsink is an extra slot thicker than the XC, so it runs significantly cooler (maybe as much as 8-10C according to the forums). Especially at "normal" gaming loads outside of stress tests. I just got done playing for a bit and my max GPU temp says 68C. I still have the stock fan curve and I never really heard them spin up substantially. I've seen it get into the low 70's during stress testing, but never above 75C or so.

Lastly, it's all about airflow. My radiator never really gets hot enough to warm up the case any meaningful amount. I mean, my peak coolant temp as I look at it right now (after gaming) is 31.8C. The three NF-A12x25's pulling air through the radiator into the case are always going at like 25% and ramp up to 40% as soon as I hit 30C on the coolant. The three exhausts and the bottom intake (which blows right to the GPU fans) are always going at least 40% or so, ramping up to a max of 70-80% as GPU or CPU temps rise substantially above idle. The air in the case never gets very warm as a result.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

The VRM isn't "bad" and there's nothing wrong with it. It's only 4 phases yes, but it's also objectively better than the 8 phase used on the Maximus X. Phase count isn't all that matters, the components and configuration do as well. In this case for vcore it uses eight smart power stages which I think can handle 50-60 amps each, two per phase.

I think the only part worth getting upset about is the deceptiveness on the part of Asus calling it a "twin 8 phase" or whatever in their advertising, but in terms of functionality there's nothing wrong with it. It works fine in my case and there's plenty of other examples of people taking 9900K's to 5.3-5.4 or even using it for extreme overclocking beyond 6.5 GHz on LN2. The power delivery is more than sufficient for the needs of any "normal" overclocker. The only drawback I've seen with this VRM configuration compared to others is that the Maximus VRM tends to be maybe 10C warmer than some other boards, but with adequate case airflow that's a non-issue. It's still well under any temps where you'd be concerned.

Also, as pointed out by Elmor who used to work at Asus on various forums, the Maximus boards have a method of measuring vcore voltage which is much more accurate than most other boards. For that reason you'll typically observe what looks like more vdroop and lower voltages under load but in reality it's the other boards which usually show you voltages which are higher than what the CPU is actually getting because they are measured further away.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I added two pictures to the end of my gallery, the first with the case fully assembled and the second with the front panel removed. The combination of the radiator, front dust filter, and the fact that I put the LED's on the inner side of the front fans means that not a ton of light gets through the front. If you were to put your fans in a push config with the radiator on the inside that would certainly let more light through. This config is fine with me since I wasn't going for anything crazy coming out the front. I just wanted the lightshow through the side window.

Since I'm using halos I could also flip them to the other side of the fans and also probably see more through the front. I could also take the halos off the fans and instead put them directly under the front panel in front of the radiator (or between radiator and front) to act as light rings, if I just wanted lights out the front. Some small amount of modding might be necessary, but there should be clearance and I think most/all of the screw holes should be there.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Under crazy sustained stress test or benchmark load I hit low 90's on the CPU at 5.1 GHz, but that's typical for the 9900K with all 16 threads maxed out and drawing over 200 watts.

Under more typical use cases like work or gaming, the CPU normally peaks in the high 60's or sometimes low 70's, and is often lower. It idles just above ambient in the low 30's.

Unless you get an awful chip that needs a lot of voltage, you shouldn't have a problem running the 9900K at 5.0GHz with an H100i. If you can keep the vcore under 1.32v or so heat should be manageable. Beyond that you might push 100C under certain stress tests, but likely not normal use.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah, Corsair Link (Cue is their RGB software which I don't use). I have the fans wired into the pump so all that is controlled from their software. It's the simplest way to get fan speed linked to coolant temp, which is what you want. It's also the only way to have control over the pump speed. There are other ways to connect it depending on how you want to control things, but this is the "standard" configuration as described in the instructions from the AIO.

I haven't had any issues with it thus far. It just works. The only thing I use it for is to set the pump speed and AIO fan curves.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Not difficult. There are a lot of guides online, and this overclocks in basically the same manner as any other Coffee Lake chip. It's definitely fast. It barely gets taxed under normal real-world use or most games. It only ever really gets warm under synthetic loads like stress tests and benchmarks which deliberately load all 16 threads.

Your mileage may vary depending on how good your particular chip is. I think mine is maybe slightly above average, but certainly not close to the best I've seen online in terms of clocks/voltages. Really if you can get stable at 5GHz all cores at under 1.30v you're doing ok. Most 9900K's should be able to do that.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

The whole setup is basically silent, even while gaming. The loudest thing in the case most of the time is the 2.5" HDD, to give you an idea.

The radiator fans key off of coolant temp. They are at a minimum of 30% all the time and then ramp up to full speed from 30-40C. You can't really hear them at all until at least 50-60%, and they're only really obvious from 90-100% (which they basically never reach since coolant temp rarely exceeds low 30's under load).

The 4 other case fans are configured in the BIOS and are always at 40-50% minimums which is also silent. They ramp up based on GPU temp, and in the case of the three exhaust fans, either GPU or CPU temp (to help cool VRM's). I max them out at like 80%.

Temps when gaming so far seem to be in the high 60's or low 70's on both the GPU and CPU. The GPU in particular runs quite cool, and I haven't really noticed the GPU fans ever becoming audible. And that's with a pretty substantial overclock with a 140 core offset and 900 memory offset.

Comment reply on tostitobandito's Completed Build: 2018 Gaming Desktop (with pretty lights)

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I decided to wait for ether the prices to drop to a reasonable level, or more likely for the next gen. I can sell my 2080 at that point, probably for not too much of a loss. I had a fundamental/philosophical problem with paying $1200-1300 for a GPU, regardless of how fancy the rest of my system is.

I actually intended on buying a 1080ti and not a 2080, but the supply of desirable models evaporated and the prices became more or less the same as 2080's.

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