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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ethernet Cable is in but there is no wifi"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not sure what your specific situation is, but you likely have to associate the driver to the hardware, especially since you proclaimed to have merely "downloaded" the drivers rather than "installed" them. I also have little idea how experienced you are, so I will go through every step.

If the drivers came as an archived file (such as a zip folder), extract them as needed. If there is an installer wizard for the drivers, run the wizard. If not, continue on.

Open Device Manager (you can do this from the start menu or through control panel). Under 'Network adapters', you will see your ethernet adapter. If there is no such category, your device may not be recognized yet and under 'Other devices'. Select the ethernet adapter, and in the secondary click menu, there will be an option to 'Update Driver Software'. If you previously used the wizard, the 'search automatically' option should work. In other cases, use the 'browse my computer' option and locate the downloaded drivers.

There are many articles on the internet showing the steps I have just outlined above.

Some users have had issues with the motherboard manufacturer's drivers not installing properly. If this is the case, try obtaining the drivers from the ethernet adapter manufacturer (could be Atheros, Intel, Realtek, or some other brand).

If all this does not work, you will have to be more specific about what you have and have not done so far on your system.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Connected to the internet via cable but still not getting the 100 mb/s speed? wwwWWHHHAATtt?"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

To me, it seems strange that there would be speed caps on the different frequencies. Is there any way to remove them such that you can achieve 100 Mbps internet on the 2.4 GHz network?

This is something we may have both overlooked: even when your network cable is plugged in, your wireless card may still be on and connecting to a wireless network. Essentially, your wired interface is communicating directly with your router, and your wireless interface is communicating with the 2.4 GHz network. A smart enough computer should automatically decide which to use for internet connection. However, the other network should still be available for communication as long as your computer keeps both systems on (suppose you are connected to free wi-fi at a café shop and connect an ethernet cable to another computer: you still have internet access through the café and can run file transfers with the other computer at the ethernet speed).

Comment reply on P0tat0z's Completed Build: A 12 year old's TRASH build

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

The i5-7600 comes with a stock cooling solution. It comes in the box along with the CPU.

The BXTS15A is not the same as a regular Intel stock cooler. The TS15A is a larger cooler designed for the LGA 1151 "K" SKUs (i5-6600K, i5-7600K, i7-6700K, and the i7-7700K).

Comment reply on bromanreturns's Completed Build: First Build 889.83$ complete

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

The BXTS15A is not the same as a regular Intel stock cooler. The TS15A is a larger cooler designed for the LGA 1151 "K" SKUs (i5-6600K, i5-7600K, i7-6700K, and the i7-7700K).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Connected to the internet via cable but still not getting the 100 mb/s speed? wwwWWHHHAATtt?"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

The internet speeds that your ISP provides may differ throughout the day. Please compare the 5 GHz connection and the wired connection at the same time for more accurate results.

How exactly are the speeds "capped"? Is there a router setting preventing users from exceeding a set speed, is it a hardware limitation, or are they speed limits in your experience? What is the advertised speed of your ISP?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New Internet and Streaming"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Twitch provides some basic broadcasting guidelines: https://stream.twitch.tv/encoding/

Keep in mind that the video bitrate should be able to be changed as needed, depending on your streaming software. You could have the same bitrate at both resolutions, but the video quality would be higher for the lower resolution stream.

Your current upload speed exceeds the Twitch guidelines for 1080p @ 60 FPS. 30 megabit/s > 6000 kilobit/s = 6 megabit/s Assuming that your hardware can handle it, I would stream at 1080p.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ethernet Cable is in but there is no wifi"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

First of all, wi-fi and internet are not synonymous.

As xbiker12 mentioned, you are likely lacking the proper drivers for the ethernet device. Your motherboard should come with a CD that contains the drivers. If you do not have an optical drive, see if you can use a different internet connected device to download the drivers from the manufacturer's website and then transfer them to your new computer.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Network Adapter Not detected"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Is this a new system, or are you upgrading a previously working system? For a new system, you may need additional drivers for the wireless card.

If the SSD is an NVMe one that uses PCIe lanes, your motherboard may be preventing certain PCIe slots from functioning such that the SSD has lanes provided. I would consult your motherboard manual. If the SSD is simple SATA, this would not be an issue.

I would try resetting the BIOS settings. It is also plausible that you may have shorted something while installing the SSD.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Casual build running Linux"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

When you say stream at 4K, do you want to livestream upload to a platform such as Twitch or YouTube, or do you want to downstream content from services like Netflix and Amazon?

I will be assuming you mean the latter. https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/N2x4r6

As you mentioned, your needs are not greatly intensive. I have chosen moderate parts that would likely fit your needs. The motherboard and case provide room for plenty of upgrades in the future. The CPU already comes with a stock cooler, so you will not need a separate aftermarket cooler. You will also be well off using the integrated graphics on the CPU, so you will not need a separate graphics card.

I cannot really make suggestions about peripherals since your needs/preferences will differ. If you need wi-fi capabilities, keep in mind that you will need a wireless network card.

I would suggest waiting a few months until building. Prices of current hardware will likely drop with the upcoming release(s) of new hardware from several manufacturers.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I need trading computer."

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

The main problem is finding cards that can output such high resolutions and pairing it with a CPU that won't be overwhelmed by that many outputs. All you plan on doing is trading which generally involves rendering basic 2D diagrams and possible some 3D charts. These operations run well even on stock graphics. Anything beyond a 1050 Ti is optimized for heavy 3D workloads. There is very little performance gain on the 2D side. If you had enough lanes, you could even plug in 4 graphics cards and run each display off of those.

One thing I did not consider is the amount of video memory that the low-end cards have. However, it is said that these chips can support those resolutions, so I am uncertain.

Another mistake on my part: the EVGA GT 1030 that I put in does not have the required outputs to support your needed resolution. There is the "2GH LP OC" version by MSI which should have the needed outputs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Help Building $3,000 Desktop"

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh my, that CPU costs twice as much as the one I put. I think that build would come out to between 3500 and 4000 dollars. A big difference is the amount of RAM and the cooling system. The one in the video has 64 GB of RAM while my list only has 16 GB. RAM is pretty expensive today, so it may be hard to get 64 GB. You mentioned running large mod packs. You may have to do some research to see if you need more (32 GB) RAM for your games. The graphics card on my list is a "better" model than the one in the video. Since you want to prioritize performance, I think a CPU and RAM upgrade would make the most sense. You are going to be streaming, so you want a CPU that can handle the video encoding while gaming. I don't think the GPU needs any additional upgrade.

Intel has a higher class of CPUs (Skylake-X and KabyLake-X) which require a different motherboard chipset which can be more expensive. The list I made has the highest level CPU for the chipset. You could go with an i7-7800X and pair it with an appropriate motherboard. With the CPU upgrade, you might also need a higher wattage power supply. I'm not sure if you need peripherals or not, so your headroom may vary. If you don't need any peripherals, you could go even further and get an i7-7820X.

List with i7-7800X, 32 GB of RAM, and different motherboard, graphics card, and power supply: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/cHML4q

The build in the video also had a custom water cooling loop. If you are comfortable setting up and maintaining it, it's not a bad idea with your budget. However, you are a novice so I think it may be better to stick with an all-in-one for now.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with a Salvage NAS Build"

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

I think the memory you have is DDR3 ECC, so it may be difficult to find an appropriate motherboard/CPU combination for that these days. Since it is only a NAS system, you won't need a very powerful CPU, and 4 GB of RAM should be plenty. I am not too familiar with the case on the list, but it has lots of room for 3.5" drives. The motherboard has 6 SATA ports.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WQ2hKB

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need Help Building $3,000 Desktop"

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Since you mentioned, it is important to consider which RGB solution you want. Different manufacturers offer different solutions for synchronized lighting effects in several of your components. Asus has their AuraSync, Gigabyte has RGB Fusion and Corsair has iCue. The build was done with AuraSync and iCue in mind.

It seems like you are new to computer building, so just some things to note: you will need an operating system (e.g. Windows) to install on the computer. If you don't already have them, you will need peripherals (e.g. pointing device, keyboard, display). If you plan to use Wi-Fi with your system, you will need either a separate wireless network adapter or a motherboard with a built in wireless adapter. Computer parts can be swapped out for others at almost any time. If you plan on using CDs and DVDs with the computer, you will need either an internal or external (USB) optical drive.

If you plan to stream while gaming, you will need a plenty powerful CPU. Since you have the budget, I might consider even higher end CPUs, but for now, I put in the top of the line desktop use on the Intel side (i7-8700K). The two major CPU manufacturers are Intel and AMD. Personally I have seen better reliability from Intel, but AMD may be better and cheaper in some aspects.

For CPU cooling, you will need to purchase an aftermarket cooler since we chose an Intel "K" CPU. I think the lighting effects are better on the NZXT Kraken x62, but to use Corsair iCue, I put in the H115i PRO. For the motherboard, I would recommend getting one from either Gigabyte or Asus. I put in an Asus motherboard that supported the AuraSync. For the RAM, you want at least 16 GB for your scenario. To again match iCue, I put in Corsair RGB RAM. For the storage, you want a smaller sized SSD for storing your operating system and applications. The Samsung 960/970 series is an NVMe drive which means that it is even faster than a traditional SATA SSD (which is already plenty fast). There isn't a huge difference in real usage performance, but it keeps the system running fast. Sicne you have the budget, I put in a 500 GB one, but if you want, you could go for only 250 GB. For storing other large files, you can get a large capacity mechanical hard drive. I'm not sure how much you will need, so I just put in 2 TB for now.

For your graphics card, I would normally recommend EVGA since they have excellent support, but since you specifically want RGB, I went with Asus. I put in the highest end nVidia card for desktop use, the GTX 1080 Ti. You could get a Titan if you wanted, but I don't think you will need it. The other big manufacturer is AMD which offers their new Vega cards.

I put a power supply that can be monitored by iCue, but it is a bit pricey. You can go with something simpler like the RM6/750x if you wanted. For the case, it's all up to you. Corsair has some cases with tempered glass and RGB flares, but I don't know what your style is. For now, I put in the Obsidian 500D with RGB which comes with the Commander Pro. For full RGB lighting you can replace the fans that come with the radiator with RGB fans, but make sure they provide enough static pressure. You can also add separate RGB light strips for increased lighting.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Pv3hKB

If you want to increase performance with your leftover budget, you can look into higher-end CPUs or GPUs such as the Skylake-X series or the GTX Titan Xp. I also don't think it would make a big difference in lighting if AuraSync was abandoned and you went with a different motherboard and an EVGA graphics card. With Gigabyte, you can get similar lighting results, along with the motherboard and RAM having matching colors.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I need trading computer."

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

After some further reading, it seems that having low powered cards running 2 monitors each is best. I would even recommend some older generation cards (e.g. GT 710), but they may not support 2x 4K displays. If you want to go lower, I believe the GT 1030 can support those resolutions. I am not too familiar with the specific card you mentioned, but it seems to fit your scenario since it will be silent. However, one oddity is that according to their website, the maximum support resolution is different than a traditional 1050 Ti, so you would have to do some research to see if it would actually work. Early when I recommended a GTX 1060, I was doing it solely based off ports, but I now see that it is more power than you need.

In the new generation of Intel processors, the i5s and i7s have more cores at lower clock speeds. This would only be helpful if your applications can take advantage of multi-threaded workloads. You would have to find out what your specific trading applications can use, but I don't think a lot of them utilize multiple threads. If you still want an i7, maybe consider the older KabyLake processors. On the graphics perspective, more monitors would burden the GPUs (which do receive instructions from the CPU) so generally, the CPU would not matter too much. However, you are attempting to run 5x 4K displays, so the CPU may make a difference. I actually forgot to consider PCIe lanes, but it seems that the i5s and i7s both support up to 16 on the CPU, so there would be little difference there. If you have the budget (seems like you do), personally, I would go with an i7. Possible system build: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/XCHXnH

For cooling, all non-K Intel CPUs come with a stock cooler which is perfectly fine for general use. If you want something that may be quieter or if you get a "K" CPU, I would consider the Hyper 212 EVO/X. Since you depend on stability, I would not rely on overclocking your system.

As for the case situation, I would still recommend using an actual case. There would be a lot of dust build up and there is always the chance of exposure to moisture (even possible when sneezing). This may be some older knowledge that is no longer relevant, but do note that the computer case is a closed metal enclosure, so it acts as a faraday cage to block electromagnetic waves. A case would also provide a proper flow for air to travel, but even with only passive cooling, your CPU and graphics card will probably fine, but the motherboard may get toasty.

I am not too familiar with the AMD line of things with Ryzen and Threadripper. I have heard that they may be better and cheaper for certain tasks, but I do not know how reliable and long-lasting the components are compared to Intel.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I need trading computer."

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Just giving my personal thoughts on your situation. If all you will be doing is trading, you will get by fine with just an Intel i3 or i5. The problem is you have to drive a lot of monitors, so there is a chance that i3s would bottleneck your GPUs. Since you have the budget, I would go with an i5 or equivalent. As for the RAM, again, if all you are doing is trading, 32 GB may be more than needed. I understand that many desktops can get cluttered with tabs (I use virtual desktops, aka spaces, for macOS), but even with 8 GB, you can have about 25 tabs open without using swap and about up to 40 tabs before crashing. I think 16 GB would be enough, and remember that you can always add later. I don't understand what the 2 TB HDD is for unless you have to store lots of files. I would go with just a single 250/256 GB SSD. An NVMe drive (e.g. Samsung 960/970 EVO/PRO) would make the system theoretically even faster than a traditional SSD (which is already plenty fast), and they do not currently cost significantly more. They would also help if you have worries about using swap when running out of memory.

Based on Root_User's post, I would agree that it is theoretically possible to output 5x 4K displays with such a setup. I would have gone with 2x EVGA GTX 1060s since they have 3x DisplayPort ports each. The integrated graphics is also a highly usable option to push out another display. For the case, I would go with something simple such as the Corsair 200R. I would avoid using a test bench as a long-term case since the computer should have a proper enclosure to direct airflow, reduce background electric static, keep dust out, etc.

Since you asked for silence, just some friendly reminders: get a power supply and graphics cards whose fans don't turn until under heavy load. You don't have to plug in all of your case fans, but I would still keep one exhaust plugged in, and since you might have some graphics card, intake fans may be required. Be aware that some cases are more "soundproof" than others. Since you mentioned it, liquid cooling may actually cause even more noise since the pump has to be driven along with more fans if a large radiator is used.

If you need the storage but still want to keep the system quiet, a separate network storage solution may help since that can be placed in a different location. However, these do need to be maintained and, like any device, are still prone to failure.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "($2000) help with a CAD WORKSTATION / RENDERING / 3D Modeling"

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Taking the Intel side on this for now. Ryzen may be a better deal on paper, but just personally, I've seen better reliability with Intel. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/HVfXnH

I would recommend getting a motherboard from either Gigabyte or Asus, as they make products they stand by. I'm not too sure what your specific storage needs are, so I put in a Samsung NVMe SSD and a 2TB hard drive. Samsung makes good storage solutions and they have their own software that helps with optimizations and driver updates. With you NVMe drive, you get much faster continuous speeds than a traditional SSD. This would help in copying large files. If you wanted, you could get a larger traditional SSD and use it to store "live" files that you currently work on and keep old files that are no longer frequently used on the HDD. That way, they would load quicker than when kept on the HDD. I put in a GTX 1080 for now, but depending on your workload, you may want the 1080 Ti. Putting two cards in is also an option, but I recommend getting the best graphics card you can afford now and think about adding on later. If you do have any plans for expanding, you may need a higher wattage power supply. In either case, I recommend getting a graphics card from EVGA since they have excellent support and warranty if/when needed. Don't forget that you need an operating system.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3500€ gaming/streaming pc theorycrafting need advice (long post)"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry for the late reply. For boot times and gaming, you probably won't see much benefit from a 960 EVO compare to an 850 EVO. For video editing, it may come in handy as a scratch disk or when exporting files. Also, 1TB seems a bit much for an SSD, but if you need it all, then I guess? If you want, you could split it up into two SSDs, one 960 and one 850. Generally, most case fans that come with the case are fine. The case fans on the list also seem to be pressure optimized, so I am not sure what your intentions are for those. If you had multiple hard drives blocking the front or some other obscure situation, they may apply, but for your situation, I so little to no need for them I unless I have overlooked something. The case you selected comes with 3 fans, and the top hard drive cage can be removed.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3500€ gaming/streaming pc theorycrafting need advice (long post)"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

The 8700K is in the hierarchy somewhere. I thought the 7820X with more cores would be a better processor for streaming. On the gaming side, the results will probably be very similar with the 8700K coming just very slightly ahead. In terms of price to performance, the 8700K probably has better value, but the availability may be limited.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Prebuilt price vs Own build?"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

The graphics card jump seems reasonable in pricing. The other upgrades seem relatively expensive. The SSD from your old PC will surely speed things up. Warranty/support is nice to have, although I'm not sure how helpful it will be.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3500€ gaming/streaming pc theorycrafting need advice (long post)"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm going to start with the dual box and CPU dilemma first and then later on after more thinking, I'll get back to you on the other stuff. For gaming, you probably will not need more than 4c/8t. There aren't many games that take advantage of high core counts, and they mainly depend on fast clock speeds. For gaming, the highest I would go is the 7700K. On the GPU side, you want the most powerful single card you can afford. SLI performance depends on the games you intend on playing. On some games, the developers don't put a lot of support into it, so your performance gains won't be a lot. You'll have to do your research on that part.

Streaming is a whole different story since the computer (most likely) needs to encode your video feed stream into (usually) H.264. This is where the high core processors like the 7900X would come in handy. A powerful GPU wouldn't affect performance too much but a decent GPU is better than nothing.

For video editing, generally, a powerful CPU is what you want and a powerful GPU boosts some performance depending on what program you use. It sounds like you probably won't do too much editing so we can focus on the CPU. What would help a lot is a lot of fast storage. I'm not sure how much you plan on doing video editing so I will consider a middle range.

The streaming computer could also be your editing computer since you don't need a super powerful GPU. Around 8-10 cores would be optimal. For the GPU, you probably only need a GTX 1050Ti or 1060. You have a huge budget and it seems like you want to optimize your experience without spending too much. 8-10 cores for a basic streaming computer is a lot, but it will probably work really well. You have the budget so it's up to you on how you want to use it.

The problem with two machines is it gets really expensive; I had two new lists total ~3800.

Considering a single machine: The Threadripper side seems too limited in terms of choices with coolers and motherboards. Ryzen 7 might be a good choice for doing both gaming and streaming. On the high-end, a 7820X looks good. Again, you have the budget so you can control where on the spectrum you want to buy; Intel and AMD both have several options for processors. 1800X: https://it.pcpartpicker.com/list/t4v8f8 7820X ("hybrid" of two below): https://it.pcpartpicker.com/list/cmHfqk

Here are lists if you were to consider a two machine setup. I made these without considering the parts you already have. Gaming: https://it.pcpartpicker.com/list/NJGBM8 Streaming/Editing: https://it.pcpartpicker.com/list/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Custom Build"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

It is saying that the cooler might need separate hardware for that specific motherboard. You would have to do your research and see whether you need to purchase a separate mounting bracket or if you can get away with a different motherboard/cooler combination. The cooler says it supports AM4. An ATX case allows you to put in such a motherboard if you ever want to upgrade. There is nothing wrong with putting a smaller motherboard in a larger case. If you had the budget, I would add an SSD to speed up the overall system. Also, the motherboard only has 2 DIMM slots, so you won't be able to add more RAM unless you swap out the 2x4GB sticks. Don't forget that you need an operating system.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Mid range gaming/college work black and red pc first build , thoughts comments concerns."

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

For multiple tabs and apps open at once, a lot of RAM helps. 16 GB should be enough for most situations. For cooling, it depends on how far you want to overclock. You could search up specific cooler/processor pairs to see how far people got it. Your selected motherboard does not natively come with wi-fi, so if you plan on using wi-fi, you will need a separate wireless adapter. I think your motherboard can support an M.2 wi-fi card if you are interested. The more common option is a PCIe card such as the TP-Link TL-WDN4800. For the power supply, 650W is good. The lowest I would go for those parts is 550W. Generally, most cases these days come with sufficient case fans so you won't need any extra unless you want higher quality fans, LED fans, etc.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Prebuilt price vs Own build?"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

The pricing isn't bad (not sure if it was before or after taxes). I'm not sure how much Alienware conforms to ATX standards, so upgrading in the future may be difficult. As always, with custom building, you have more freedom on the parts you choose and the features that come with it. You can customize your computer to your specific needs. Coffee Lake isn't fully out yet and the 1070Ti just came out, so since you have to wait, there might be better deals during Black Friday through Cyber Monday.

Comparable System: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/3bCpXH

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is there a dominant RGB motherboard company"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Asus has their own Aura Sync which is not only implemented into their own products but also other manufacturers support it. NZXT has Hue+, but I'm not too sure on their compatibility with other parts.

https://www.asus.com/campaign/aura/us/Sync.html https://www.nzxt.com/products/hue-plus

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How Good Are These? Budget is $2,000"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Since you don't plan on overclocking, you won't need such a high-end aftermarket cooler. A standard air cooler would do just fine. If you are going for aesthetics, I guess it could work. The Asus PRIME Z270-A is decent for your usage. From higher end motherboards, you usually get better sound cards, better network cards, more ports/headers, extra features (error codes, power switch, etc.), and usually better stability with overclocking and power delivery. Most motherboards these days come with decent audio and gigabit network cards which will work plenty well. If you're not overclocking you probably wouldn't need the Z270 chipset, but you mentioned adding more PCIe cards which may require the Z270 chipset. Unless you are doing some super fancy audio setup, you probably won't need an additional sound card. The one on the selected motherboard can support 7.1 surround sound. Generally, you should get the best graphics card you can afford right now. If you don't plan on adding more graphics cards, a 650W power supply should suffice.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Ever gaming Build"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

As long as the modem you use can support the speeds you pay for, I don't think it would make much of a difference. I think some internet companies may force you to use a specific modem, or if you do switch, you need to call them and tell them you changed it. What you want is a good router/hub/switch. All of your computers (generally) connect to the router which is wired to the modem. If your router is too slow, you won't see the speeds you pay for. Also if you are doing network file transfers a fast router would be beneficial.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New to PC Building!"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

If you plan on using a blower style card, it wouldn't matter too much where the radiator went. For an open shroud card, you want to put the radiator at the front and not the top. Generally, the power supply is positioned with the fan outwards (generally down) so that it has it's own separate own cooling; the exception is if you have the computer on thick carpet and the case doesn't have big enough feet. Depending on the games you play, you may need more GPU power for 4K.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Budget Home Server - Opinions?"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

For just file storage, you could look into prebuilt NAS systems. For messing with VMs, the servers that tragiktimes101 mentioned would probably be good, although it might use a lot of power.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need advice on how to make a cheaper/better gaming PC"

  • 28 months ago
  • -1 points

Since you going with a Pentium, it might be cheaper to get a Skylake Pentium since you only need an H110 motherboard. The drawback is you lose hyper-threading that the newer Pentium has. Unless you absolutely need the small form factor, I would recommend a graphics card from EVGA. They make great products and have excellent support if/when needed. You could get away with a lower wattage power supply. I put in a cheaper faster mechanical hard drive. Generally, you want to get a 7200RPM one unless. If you really wanted to save, you could get one with a smaller capacity. Don't forget that you need an operating system.

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/FMCGyf

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is This Build Any Good"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

If all you are doing is school work, you might be better off with just getting a laptop. With a PC, you would need monitors at both houses and you would need to pay a premium for the operating system. I'm not sure what your budget or workload is. If you aren't handling with large video files or a ton of apps, you could get away with just a 250GB SSD. If you don't plan on expanding, I would recommend getting the RAM in a kit (2x4GB) for dual-channel performance. I'm not sure how reliable the PSU the case comes with is, so you may have to do your own research on that. It might be cheaper to go with a Skylake Pentium but the prices in Australia aren't great. If you did, you could get just an H110 motherboard and add on a wireless adapter card (if you need one). The problem is again pricing in Australia if you needed a mini-ITX motherboard. Also, you would lose hyper-threading that the newer Pentium has. The micro-ATX boards are at a decent price but not the mini-ITX ones.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Current build and upgrade list. Need advice on upgrade priority"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Since you are streaming, it would probably be better to use an i7 since you most likely have to encode your video footage to H.264. If you went with the 7700 you wouldn't need an aftermarket cooler. If you went with the 7700K, it would cost more, you would need an aftermarket cooler, but you can overclock with the Z170 motherboard. If you want to save, the Samsung 850 EVO would perform very similarly in gaming compared to the 960 EVO. Also consider if you really need the 500GB or if you can get away with only 250GB since you have the 1TB mechanical drive. For 4K gaming on decent settings you want a powerful graphics card. I'm not sure on specifics but you might need better than a 1080. You should do some research on the specific games/settings you want to play at and see what kind of power you need. 650W for the power supply is a good amount. At the lowest, I would go 550W. Make sure to get the latest BIOS on the motherboard before changing out the CPU.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Xd9b7h

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Ever gaming Build"

  • 28 months ago
  • 2 points

The i5-7500 comes with a stock cooler, so you won't need an aftermarket one. If possible, I would get the RAM in a kit (2x4GB) unless you plan to buy the exact same model later to upgrade. You could speed up your system a lot by simply adding an SSD such as the Samsung 850 EVO. The WD Red hard drive is designed for NAS systems, and you normally wouldn't put them in a gaming build. You could get a WD blue or black, or you could get a Seagate Barracuda. Also consider if you plan on using the whole 2TB or if you only need 1TB. For the graphics card, I would recommend getting one from EVGA. They make great products and have excellent support if/when needed. If you plan on mainly gaming, you should invest into a higher GPU such as the GTX 1050Ti or the 1060. The case you selected has only one front USB 3 and USB 2 port. This header can support up to two, but since there is only one, the header is being wasted. I would recommend a case with two front USB 3 ports. If you plan on using Wi-Fi, you will need a wireless network card.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/dx6kxY

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dedicated Streaming Build!"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

You might be able to get away with a Coffee Lake i3 at that budget, but you'd need to pay a little premium for the motherboard and you would have to wait a while.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "intel $1200-1300 USD"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

You should do some research on what resources the specific games you play depend on. The higher end Coffee Lake CPUs have more cores but at lower clock speeds. Most games probably cannot take advantage of 6 cores and a faster processor would be better. If you wanted Coffee Lake, an i3 would do pretty well. Along with Coffee Lake, there would also be a small premium for the Z370 motherboards.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "intel $1200-1300 USD"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

If you wanted, you could upgrade to a i7-7700. The list only has an a/b/g/n adapter, but if you have an ac router, an ac Wi-Fi Adapter would be beneficial.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/CzBCNN

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cheapest SFF HTPC with optical drive."

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Azulle makes some small simple HTPCs. Since they support Windows, software can be updated and streaming services will work without hassle since you're on an actual computer. You could buy an external USB blu-ray drive and plug it in. These devices cost a bit more than what the OS by itself would cost. If you wanted, you could also get a wireless mouse and keyboard.

Another option is the Intel NUC which is a small customizable unit. Similarly, you would need an external USB blu-ray drive.

http://a.co/5nBD84k http://a.co/bIyYVsO https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/products/boards-kits/nuc.html

Comment reply on Forum Topic "gaming pc"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

Everyone's storage needs differ; the submitter did not specify what types of games he/she would be playing so I put a 250GB SSD as a baseline.

Per vagabond139's request, here is the list with an added 1TB mechanical hard drive: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/BY3PPs

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Cad Gaming Desktop"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

It seems that SolidWorks rendering isn't too GPU dependent unless you have some Quadros (I may be wrong, so you will have to do your own research on what your specific workflow requires and uses; if it helps to have a powerful GPU, then you probably want one; if it doesn't support GPU rendering, you probably don't need one).

League of Legends is also not very demanding unless you want ultra frame rates or high resolutions. For now, I put in a GTX 1050Ti. If you want more power, you could upgrade to a 1060 or a 1070. If you had the budget, you could also get a better aftermarket cooler. If you need more storage, you can add a mechanical hard drive. The SSD is a Samsung 960 EVO which is blazing fast, but if you had to save money, you could get the 850 EVO which is still fast.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/JWkY3F

Comment reply on Forum Topic "gaming pc"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

If you needed the storage you could add a mechanical hard drive. If you had the budget, you could get a better aftermarket cooler.

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/YLQkxY

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Suggest a build for Dreamcast emulation"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

I am confused as to whether you need peripherals or not. You said you would like a barebones system, but near the end you use a passive voice, saying that one would need <peripherals>. And so, I made a list of a barebones system.

I'm not sure how much video power such a system would need, so I am assuming the integrated graphics on an Intel chip will suffice. If you were on a budget, a lower processor might work. The selected processor is the lowest one with Intel HD Graphics 530 rather than 510. You could also get a cheaper case with the tradeoff of manufacturing quality. The motherboard and case have plenty of USB ports. The motherboard supports DVI, VGA, and HDMI video output.

P.S. It might be easier to find an old prebuilt system rather than spending a lot of money on a new one. Maybe also find an old monitor.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fLRchq

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1200 - 1500 CAD Gaming PC"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

I made the list with an i5-8400. If you want, you could go with a i5-7600 and a lower end motherboard. The current list can theoretically support up to 2-way CrossFire and 3-way if you get a higher wattage power supply. If you don't think you'll add more cards, you could go with a lower wattage power supply (around 550-650). If you need more storage, you could get a larger SSD or add a mechanical hard drive.

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/GTz4xY

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$800 First Gaming PC Budget for a Mac Guru"

  • 28 months ago
  • 0 points

This is a decent budget build. Eventually you could upgrade up to a 7700K provided you have an aftermarket cooler. You can also add 2 high end GPUs in SLI provided you have a power supply with a sufficient wattage output. The current power supply could probably support a GTX 1080Ti. The motherboard has a M.2 slot for high speed NVMe SSDs such as the Samsung 960 EVO. If you need more storage, the case can support up to several 2.5" and 3.5" drives and the motherboard has six SATA III ports. For graphics cards and processors, you should probably invest in the best one you can afford right now.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/6dX8f8

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1400 PC build - gaming and 3d modelling"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are only modeling and not rendering in 3D, you won't need a super powerful graphics card. Since you will also be gaming, you will need something. You may have to do some research on what resources are needed in your specific workflow (CPU, GPU, memory). If you are rendering you might need a more powerful computer. If you need more storage, you could add a mechanical hard drive. If you had the budget, you could upgrade the graphics card. You could also get a 7700K, but then you would need an aftermarket cooler.

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/Rt69VY

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dedicated Streaming Build!"

  • 28 months ago
  • 2 points

Since you're only streaming, you would need a decent CPU along with integrated graphics. Depending on where you're streaming too, you will probably need to encode to H.264 which requires a decent CPU. The listed CPU comes with a stock cooler, so you won't need an aftermarket cooler. If you had the budget, you could get 8GB of RAM or a better CPU such as the i5-7600 or the i7-7700.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/6rxwxY

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Insane monster pc"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

You may have to do some research as to what resources (CPU, GPU, or memory) your specific workflow needs. The main issue would be whether to get a fast, low-core CPU such as the 7700K, or one with a lot of cores but not a high frequency such as the Skylake-X processors. A lot of RAM will help in Adobe AfterEffects (if you use it). There is a 512 GB Samsung 960 PRO which is blazing fast. If you want to go even faster, you could get an Intel 750 series, but it requires a PCIe slot. I'm not sure how much storage you need, but for now there are 4x10TB drives. You could run them in RAID configurations if you want more speed or more redundancy. The motherboard supports eight SATA III ports and the case supports up to eight 3.5" drives. If you don't need all the bays, you could get a faster 1080Ti (the cards I saw were too long for a situation with the bays, but without the bays, you can go longer). If you found the right ones, you could also invest in Titans or Quadros, but they are quite expensive. I'm not too sure how well the monitors and headset will perform, and your needs will vary, so they are just a placeholder.

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/WKFVjc

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen build for Cinema 4d / Octane Render"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

If you need more storage, you could get a larger SSD or a mechanical hard drive. I am not sure how much RAM your workflow needs, but there is 16GB for now. This build has room to add another graphics card if/when you have the money. If you don't plan to add, a lower wattage power supply would suffice.

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/xWPpXH

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Retiring and wanting to build a trading computer with 3 4k monitors."

  • 28 months ago
  • 0 points

If I understand your situation correctly, all you need is a fast computer for simple tasks and 3 monitors. If you are not running any super intensive apps, a Core i3 should be fine for everything. If you want a little more cache, you could get an i5. 16GB of RAM should be plenty. If you happen to have a lot of browser tabs open, you may need more memory. The SSD is a 960 EVO which is blazing fast. If you need to save, the 850 series is a "slower" but still fast line of SSDs from Samsung. If you need more storage, you could add a 1TB mechanical hard drive or get a larger SSD. For the graphics situation, there may be a way to use integrated graphics and some cable adapters, but if not, then there is a PNY GTX 960 on the list. It has 3 DisplayPort ports along with 1 HDMI and 1 DVI port. Another option is a GTX 1060 which has similar display ports. The monitor on the list is from a parametric filter (the cheapest one fulfilling the criteria). I can't personally make monitor recommendations, and your needs will vary.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/nkbPPs

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Around $1200 Photo Editing Build?"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

You may have to do some research as to what resources your specific tasks require (either CPU, GPU, and/or memory intensive). If you wanted you could get a faster SSD such as the 960 EVO. I am not sure how much storage you need, so for now, there is a 1TB mechanical hard drive. If you don't need a high-end CPU or GPU, you could save and invest in a high-end monitor for accurate color reproduction.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/JKnRD8

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$2000 Gaming Build"

  • 28 months ago
  • 1 point

You could get a smaller storage drive if you don't need all the space or maybe split it with a mechanical hard drive. I didn't add the monitors since I am not completely sure what you would like and your needs will vary. If you don't need an i7, the i5-7600K is also a good option.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/qn9DtJ

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