add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Strategy gamer build £800"

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

AIO coolers have a similar installation difficulty level to air coolers. They are "closed loop" (with some notable exceptions). This means you take them out of the box and install them just like an air cooler. Example: Corsair install video.

That being said, air coolers perform as good/better than water coolers depending upon a lot of factors. By perform, I mean in many dimensions such as cost, noise to cooling, and max cooling. 120mm AIO coolers like the MasterLiquid Lite 120 are made for very small form factor cases. In these cases, an air cooler that performs as good/better won't fit due to height restrictions.

TL;DR: You are correct, a similarly priced air cooler is orders of magnitude better than a MasterLiquid Lite 120.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I have little to know knowledge on parts. Can someone please build me a pc 1500-2000 price range for games like Rust, Vr chat, seige, etc(I Would like to run these with beast fps rates)"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Is everyone abandoning AMD CPU based builds? I mean, I agree in raw FPS Intel has the edge on AMD, but you can get 2nd gen 8 core SMT processors so dang cheap now....

Comment reply on Forum Topic "10 Year Anniversary Rig"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Honestly with a 1080p monitor you are fine with an Nvidia 1160 or even rx 580/590. I think the 1160 ensures optimal frame rates though. You can lower your budget considerably if that is your target.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Build a new gaming PC for me."

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Number one consideration for a gaming machine is definitely the GPU. Then again, there are some ridiculous pairings. Like a 2080 with 720p resolution is beyond ridiculous right?

So, once you work out your resolution, then the computer basically builds itself. If you are happy with 1080p, then a NVidia 1160 or AMD RX 580/590 is more than sufficient for now. A 2070 or Vega 56 would be overkill for 1080p. That class of GPU is suited for 1440P. 2080 would be a step up from that, slight overkill for 1440, but barely sufficient for 4k (you still have to turn down graphics settings). Even a 2080 ti struggles at 4K.

In my oh so humble opinion, 1440P should be your target in your budget. Since that is the case, the GPU that makes the most sense is a 2070. (The new RX Navi GPU's from AMD MIGHT be a good fit too, but you can't buy them yet, and they haven't been reviewed). If you have room in your budget, sure, stretch up to a 2080 to ensure you can select max settings.

The CPU matters a little less at 1440P. It CAN make a difference, but most reasonable CPU's with 6+ cores are going to preform very well paired with a 2080 or 2070.

That being said, this build could very well work for you, and it might even perform better over time. (a source)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $227.73 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - X470 Master SLI/AC ATX AM4 Motherboard $129.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Sniper X 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $139.99 @ Newegg
Storage Team - GX2 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $92.99 @ Newegg
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB VENTUS OC Video Card $679.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ B&H
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G1+ 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $85.98 @ Newegg
Monitor Dell - S2716DG 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $465.76 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1892.42
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-06-12 22:05 EDT-0400

Note: My prices never include Mail-In-Rebates unless specifically requested.

  • CPU: This CPU is 8 core with SMT. (16 threads of simultaneous processing). the i7-9700K absolutely wins against this processor head to head in almost any test. However, it doesn't have an appreciable "performance" difference. Therefore, I would save the $200 and spend it on your GPU instead.
  • Cooler: The CPU comes with a Wraith Cooler that will perform just fine at stock speeds. They aren't too loud either. Feel free to upgrade this to a $50-$80 cooler if/when you want to play around with overclocking.
  • MOBO: Very nice motherboard with everything you NEED to have for gaming and amateur overclocking.
  • RAM: 2x8GB is the sweet spot, and has been for a couple of years.
  • SSD: 1TB SSD. Plenty fast enough vs any plattered HDD ever made.
  • HDD: nah
  • GPU: 2080 as requested. Very very capable, though expensive GPU. Damn you AMD for not offering competition here (which would drive the price down).
  • Case: Case is 100% personal style and preference. There are certainly features that make some cases far superior to others. This case is very highly regarded, and has most of the must have features for a case in 2019.
  • PSU: Gold certified fully modular highly regarded Power Supply. Plenty of wattage for any mainstream single GPU system in 2019.
  • OS: User supplied.
  • Monitor: 1440P monitor with a fast TN panel and G-Sync.

Basically with the savings switching to an AMD platform, you can get the 2080 and a new monitor only $100 out of budget. Hope this helps!

AMD revealed several new products (both CPU's and GPU's) in the past week or so. These will not be available till next month though. So you may consider waiting until they come out. At the very least it should compress the market price-wise so your $1800 will buy a little more. The general consensus is to just pull the trigger when you are ready to buy, there will always be something new coming out. So either path is valid.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Want to build a PC for trading with 4,5 monitors but don't know where to start"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Maybe speed isn't as big a concern for you. In that case you can save a ton of money switching to AMD:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 1600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £111.97 @ Amazon UK
CPU Cooler RAIJINTEK - DELOS RBW 20.34 CFM CPU Cooler £52.35 @ CCL Computers
Motherboard ASRock - B450M Steel Legend Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £82.49 @ CCL Computers
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory £69.28 @ Amazon UK
Storage Patriot - VPN100 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £73.84 @ CCL Computers
Video Card XFX - Radeon RX 580 8 GB GTS XXX ED Video Card £159.00 @ Amazon UK
Case Silverstone - PS15 MicroATX Mid Tower Case £45.46 @ Scan.co.uk
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £75.46 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit £107.46 @ More Computers
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 PWM 53 CFM 120 mm Fan £5.48 @ AWD-IT
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 PWM 53 CFM 120 mm Fan £5.48 @ AWD-IT
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £788.27
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-06-12 14:14 BST+0100

Could you tell the difference between these two browsing the internet and using MS office...no. However, that particular Ryzen chip has more processing cores, and so it doesn't have any graphics onboard. This means the maximum number of monitors supported by the system would be 4 without adding another GPU. (The motherboard has spots to plug in monitors, but they will not function because this chip has no graphics cores, you would need an APU like the AMD - Ryzen 5 2400G. I think this matters not one bit, so I would keep the Ryzen 5 myself).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Want to build a PC for trading with 4,5 monitors but don't know where to start"

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

I think speed is paramount as every ms counts. Toward that end I selected one of the fastest CPU's out there. I put it all in a small MicroATX form factor. The GPU supports up to 4 monitors. The motherboard supports up to 3. So this single GPU configuration can support 7 monitors.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core OEM/Tray Processor £359.59 @ Overclockers.co.uk
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - M9 Plus 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler £29.28 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard ASRock - B365M Phantom Gaming 4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard £83.24 @ More Computers
Memory Patriot - Viper LED 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2400 Memory £64.99 @ Amazon UK
Storage Patriot - VPN100 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £69.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card XFX - Radeon RX 580 8 GB GTS XXX ED Video Card £159.00 @ Amazon UK
Case Silverstone - PS15 MicroATX Mid Tower Case £45.46 @ Scan.co.uk
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £75.46 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit £107.46 @ More Computers
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 PWM 53 CFM 120 mm Fan £5.48 @ AWD-IT
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 PWM 53 CFM 120 mm Fan £5.48 @ AWD-IT
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1005.43
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-06-07 13:04 BST+0100

Comment reply on SumtinWong88's Completed Build: Walnut Wall-E

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

InWin has played around with wooden pieces on cases before. These are always low production volume items at an extreme cost.

I don't know why they have such trouble producing something like this in volume, but it has often been said that it will "never" happen.

Hey, if you are the guy that figures it out, could be a gold mine!

Beautiful case and build BTW. You might consider keeping the same case, and using some sort of stand-off to get the window away from the GPU. Make it look like it is on purpose like several Thermaltake cases with similar gaps.

Comment reply on PCPartPicker Blog Post "Announcing Cycling Builder"

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Man, you ain't kidding there!!!!

Comment reply on TettenMan's Completed Build: Project The Golden Tower

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I would think complaints like this would be better directed to PCPP, not to an enthusiast that spent a ton of time, effort, and likely blood if my build experiences are anything to go by. So that is why negative Nancy's like yourself should hold your tongue and move on. Opinions are like ********, everyone has one. Doesn't mean you should make a stink!

Comment reply on TettenMan's Completed Build: Project The Golden Tower

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Beautiful build! Wesley will enjoy it, I am sure. It is so neat that it is a centerpiece that he can show off! Even non-gamers will think it looks cool as ****!

Comment reply on jerameyj's Completed Build: Weston Ryzen 2920X Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are looking to up the ante even beyond the stratospheric heights you have already obtained, they make m.2 to pcie adapters. They generally only work right if your motherboard supports biforcation of the pcie slot(s). Asus discontinued theirs and the other 4xm.2 cards aren't well reviewed on Newegg, but maybe one of the 2xm.2 cards would be fun to play with (and get you away from the vertical mount). I think your chip will support up to 8xm.2 in raid 0 hahahhahhhah. Deb8ur did a video on it about a year ago.

Comment reply on jerameyj's Completed Build: Weston Ryzen 2920X Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

****, I missed the Samsung dive. TY.

Comment reply on jerameyj's Completed Build: Weston Ryzen 2920X Build

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard has a horizontal m.2 port under the big RGB heat spreader in the lower right corner. From their website: "ROG Strix X399-E Gaming motherboards are equipped with an M.2 heatsink integrated into the PCH heatsink. With a huge cooling surface, the M.2 heatsink perfectly chills an inserted M.2 SSD — for consistent performance and reliability. Featuring a stylish angular design, the M.2 heatsink adds a beautiful touch to the build, while the T-sensor detects temperatures in the vital M.2 area for instant monitoring."

The vertical mount was probably just an afterthought. I don't really like that style either, seems like they will snap right off. Just remove the 3 screws hold that heatsink down and you will be able to insert the m.2 drive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A build under 1200"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I would not do a soundcard myself. The motherboard has built-in audio output which is suffient for most people. Those that are "audiophiles" would be better served with something like this: https://www.jdslabs.com/products/48/objective2-odac-combo-revb/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pick a Mini Case!"

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Keep in mind a lot of the truly small mini it cases like the node 202 require smaller than normal power supplies. These are called sfx size and they are not cheap generally speaking. The value options start near $45usd...

That was what made me chose a tiny case that actually supports atx PSU instead. I still spent like $80 on a seasonic focus gold because it is only 140mm long and fully modular.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Gaming PC Build and 1 of 3 Builds for myself and kids"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

It's all about balance. Having seen a crappy psu take an entire system out I always advise to err on the side of spending more.

I generally only recommend those power supplies that have been physically de-constructed and raked across the coals by the likes of http://www.jonnyguru.com.

So what is the difference in power supplies of a different caliber? Capacitors used, rectifiers and other electronic means of filtering power from the wall. The higher rated systems (rated by a third party organization known as 80 plus) generally have better components. These better components extend the life of the PSU and better protect your equipment. In the end every power supply should be made to fail. If some bad stuff comes out of the wall better to smoke your $80 PSU then your $300 CPU, and $300 GPU.

All that being said, it doesn't make sense to spend $150+ of your budget on a 800w platinum power supply. So in that case your neighbor was correct. Of, however, you are building a $3000 machine, why WOULDN'T you spend more to better protect it?

Corsair generally sells good power supplies. They don't actually make them though. There are actually only a few companies that actually manufacture psu's. They make them for companies like Corsair and others.

Sorry it isn't a simple answer. Here is my simple answer. Being an experienced builder, I anticipate spending around $80-$100 on a PSU no matter the build. I prefer fully modular platforms from evga, Silverstone and Corsair. I prefer gold certified power supplies to silver or bronze. Are there a ton of other power supplies that are just as good and $10 cheaper? Maybe, depends upon sales and such. It is too deep a field to keep track of so I don't even try. Using my method I take the easy route and I am guaranteed a good, solid power unit.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "looking to build an optimized work/gaming rig"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

m.2 is just an interface. It comes in two versions. Plain jane SATA and fast PCIe. The PCIe is know as NVMe M.2. All that being said, plain SATA is fine for speeds.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pick a Mini Case!"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

If you like the cube style cases I really like what the Thermaltake core V1 looks like. It is also super affordable so that is nice. You can add some 80mm exhaust fans if you like.

Black: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/fGvRsY/thermaltake-case-ca1b800s1wn00
White: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/M8Jkcf/thermaltake-case-ca1b800s6wn01

A more mainstream and larger option is the NZXT H200: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/ZZqhP6/nzxt-h200-blackblue-mini-itx-tower-case-ca-h200b-bl
It comes in a ton of color options.

A pretty unique case is the BitFenix Portal: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/mGzZxr/bitfenix-portal-blackwindowed-mini-itx-tower-case-bfc-pot-150-kkwkk-rp
It is nice looking, but really really large for mini-itx. The entire frame the internals mounts to slides out the rear.

My favorites have always been the super-thin HTPC style like:
Node 202: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/GsZ2FT/fractal-design-case-fdcanode202bk
Silverstone ML09B: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/cCdFf7/silverstone-ml09b-htpc-case-ml09b

There are several Silverstone variants that can even take full size (ATX) power supplies (though they recommend a shorter length of 140mm instead of the standard 150mm or long 160mm). Example: (outdated now) https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/MqmxFT/silverstone-case-sstrvz01be or new model: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/RgVBD3/silverstone-rvz03b-mini-itx-desktop-case-rvz03b
They both seem to be out of stock in Canada though.

Hope this helps!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Gaming PC Build and 1 of 3 Builds for myself and kids"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Keeping as close to yours as possible.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $165.98 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $89.99 @ Newegg
Storage Team - L5 LITE 3D 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Video Card XFX - Radeon RX 580 8 GB GTS Black Core Edition Video Card $189.99 @ Newegg
Case Cougar - MX330-G ATX Mid Tower Case $44.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply *Corsair - CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $49.99 @ Newegg
Case Fan Swiftech - HELIX120BW 55 CFM 120mm Fan $6.11 @ Amazon
Case Fan Swiftech - HELIX120BW 55 CFM 120mm Fan $6.11 @ Amazon
Monitor AOC - 24V2H 23.8" 1920x1080 75 Hz Monitor $129.92 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $867.05
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-02-01 20:41 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Workstation with Almost Unlimited Budget"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

So consider something like this, and I will explain all the pieces:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Threadripper 2950X 3.5 GHz 16-Core Processor $879.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Deepcool - Fryzen 64 CFM CPU Cooler $79.69 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte - X399 AORUS XTREME EATX TR4 Motherboard $435.83 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Sniper X 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $369.99 @ Newegg
Storage Team - L5 LITE 3D 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $134.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $134.99 @ Newegg
Storage Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K4000 4 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $101.40 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB Black Video Card $1196.98 @ Newegg
Case Thermaltake - View 71 TG ATX Full Tower Case $168.08 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - Professional 1200 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $139.99 @ Newegg
Monitor LG - 34UM88C-P 34.0" 3440x1440 60 Hz Monitor $515.12 @ Amazon
External Storage Western Digital - My Book 6 TB External Hard Drive $128.00 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $4385.04
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-02-01 18:00 EST-0500

Note: My prices never include Mail-In-Rebates unless specifically requested.

  • CPU: 16 cores with SMT for 32 concurrent threads running. It will turbo to 4.4ghz out of the box. Should beat all intel chips in the same price category. As you add cores, they tend to run them slower (AMD and Intel) so there is a tradeoff there.
  • Cooler: Aftermarket cooler required. This one should keep it cool and quiet without having to resort to AIO liquid coolers. (None of which I trust for threadripper right now).
  • MOBO: This eAtx board is both huge and feature packed. Gigabyte Product Page
  • RAM: 4 x 16GB should help ensure compatibility for faster speeds than 8 x 8GB. If I was a little less lazy I would check the motherboard QVL list to find the fastest kit that will operate in 4 x 16.
  • SSD: So the slow SSD is fine to use for your OS drive. The two Intel ones are NVMe (PCI) SSD's that plug directly into the motherboard. I checked the motherboard manual and you can for sure RAID these two together. Raid 1 will net you a 1TB drive with a 1TB backup, Raid 0 will net you a 2TB drive with no backup.
  • HDD: I threw this in there for you to use to store projects and data long term. This is a value drive, but it is used extensively by BackBlaze and has pretty good numbers/failure rates.
  • GPU: The 2080 ti is great for professionals. You might be fine with a 1050 ti or AMD RX 580. It depends upon what Illustrator and photoshop workflows favor. Hell, several of these would work better with a very fast 4 or 6 core i7 vs Threadripper.
  • Case: This is very subjective. You can get a smaller motherboard (ATX instead of eATX) and open up a ton of other smaller/cheaper cases if that is what you are going for. This one is certainly pretty though.
  • PSU: Professional power supply at a price where I am worried they will come after you for theft lol. Really good PSU, at an exceptional price.
  • OS:
  • Monitor: 4k IPS monitor.
  • Other: A large USB drive to use for backkups and transporting large amounts of data. These "desktop" platforms are not that portable as they will require a wall power plug.

Hope this helps to at least get you started. Check out this comparison on Adobe: https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Photoshop-CC-2018-CPU-Performance-AMD-Ryzen-2-vs-Intel-8th-Gen-1136/#BenchmarkResults

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Workstation with Almost Unlimited Budget"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Why Raid 1?

It isn't very safe, and it is no faster than a single drive? You could probably get just as much utility out of a 5TB USB drive that backs up a 1TB SSD if you are going for data security, and 2 x 512GB SSD in RAID 0 will give you an unsafe but fast to write drive if you are looking for fast scratch space.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Complete Set Up Challenge"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

wait...1100-2200? ****, I missed that mark by a long shot.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Complete Set Up Challenge"

  • 12 months ago
  • -1 points

Sigh.

Male:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $165.98 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory GeIL - SUPER LUCE RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg
Storage Team - L5 LITE 3D 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Video Card PowerColor - Radeon RX 590 8 GB Red Devil Video Card $259.99 @ Newegg
Case Silverstone - Redline RL05 (Black/White) ATX Mid Tower Case $83.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G1+ 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $81.32 @ Amazon
Optical Drive LG - GH24NSC0B DVD/CD Writer $18.98 @ Newegg
Monitor Dell - D2719HGF 27.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $189.77 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon - K552-R KUMARA Wired Gaming Keyboard $39.03 @ Amazon
Mouse Corsair - GLAIVE RGB Aluminum Wired Optical Mouse $48.79 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1181.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-30 00:15 EST-0500

Female:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $165.98 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $115.98 @ Newegg
Storage Team - L5 LITE 3D 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Video Card PowerColor - Radeon RX 590 8 GB Red Devil Video Card $259.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design - Focus G (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $57.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G1+ 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $81.32 @ Amazon
Optical Drive LG - GH24NSC0B DVD/CD Writer $18.98 @ Newegg
Case Fan Apevia - 12L-CWH 57.67 CFM 120mm Fan $6.52 @ Newegg
Monitor Dell - D2719HGF 27.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $189.77 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon - K552-R KUMARA Wired Gaming Keyboard $39.03 @ Amazon
Mouse Corsair - M65 PRO RGB FPS (White) Wired Optical Mouse $29.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1149.51
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-30 00:30 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "H200 1440p 144hz max graphics"

  • 12 months ago
  • -1 points

Extra room in your budget could be used on Aftermarket cooler Like an AIO or on RGB bling bling RAM.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $199.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock - Fatal1ty X470 Gaming-ITX/ac Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard $183.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $89.99 @ Newegg
Storage ADATA - Ultimate SU650 960 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $102.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $349.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H200 (Black/Red) Mini ITX Tower Case $79.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $86.74 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Monitor VIOTEK - GN27D 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $379.56 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1583.22
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-29 14:54 EST-0500

Comment reply on AlanMM's Completed Build: Compact Intel game PC

  • 12 months ago
  • 3 points

Holy mother of god that is small!!! Awesome awesome build! You did a great job!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1200 Cap Gaming PC"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Some things to consider. The SSD you selected is m.2, but it still uses sata lanes. It will be no faster than any other sata drive like the standard 2.5 inch models. The benefit of sata m.2 is it plugs directly into the motherboard similar to RAM. This, in turn, menas you won't have to run any sata data cambles to the motherboard, and no sata power cable from your power supply. Up to you if that is worth $30.

The monitor you selected is 144hz, and it supports freesync for sure. I don't know if gsync will work with it or not. That would take research. I assume not. (Nvidia announced at CES 2019 they will start to support freesync for some monitors, I don't know if that includes this model or not).

The headset seems a little expensive to me. I recently got the Corsair void pro wireless and it was only like $75. I prefer wireless headsets because cords are the bane of my existence.

I would say the 2060 is considerably better than any of the GPU's previously considered. It should even allow for 1440p performance! (Gamersnexus.net did some benchmarks, and they were very good). They have a final thought on the matter which is basically in the $350 price category go with the 2060 if you just want it to work, and the RX Vega 56 if you are willing to/enjoy messing around with the voltages and such.

I think you are pretty close!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will this Upgrade improve gaming on 3440x1440?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

You shouldn't be bottlenecked by the CPU in that scenario. Have you overclocked the CPU?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1200 Cap Gaming PC"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

You can spend it all in one shot and get a Vega 56 for about $340 instead of the RX 580.

Or you can spread it around a little bit and do something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $259.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $89.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Team - T-FORCE DELTA RGB 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $94.99 @ Newegg Business
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 590 8 GB Phantom Gaming X Video Card $239.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C Mini Dark TG MicroATX Mini Tower Case $75.90 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $81.98 @ Newegg
Case Fan Aerocool - P7-F12 45.8 CFM 120mm Fan $15.39 @ OutletPC
Monitor Acer - Nitro VG240Y bmiix 23.8" 1920x1080 75 Hz Monitor $159.05 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon - K552-R KUMARA Wired Gaming Keyboard $39.03 @ Amazon
Mouse Logitech - G502 Proteus Spectrum Wired Optical Mouse $54.11 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1194.20
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-26 18:19 EST-0500

Upgraded:

  • GPU: Spring for the extra performance provided by a 590.
  • Case: A little nicer case with a tempored glass side panel. ****, I just realized it is still a Fractal Design case lol. The Focus G is considered their "value" brand. This one is a little higher end, but still not tip top. I adore the InWin 301 in this price category. Comes with no fans though.
  • Case Fan: Added a bling bling fan. Move the existing rear fan to the front, then install this RGB bad boy to the rear. Should be able to plug it into the MOBO and control the lighting that way.
  • PSU: Really good fully modular unit. Gold certified just like the capstone unit. This is a more recent release as well, so it takes advantage of any updates to manufacturing process.

Something like that.

Hell. Let's see what others post. Maybe dropping the CPU down to a R7 1600 and getting a little smaller SSD would enable you to get into a 2070. I don't think the math works, but maybe...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$1200 Cap Gaming PC"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

So I went budget beating basic, and then you will have upgrade options.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $259.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $89.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Team - T-FORCE DELTA RGB 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $94.99 @ Newegg Business
Video Card Asus - Radeon RX 580 4 GB Dual Video Card $179.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design - Focus G Mini (Black) MicroATX Mini Tower Case $63.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Rosewill - Capstone 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $64.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Acer - Nitro VG240Y bmiix 23.8" 1920x1080 75 Hz Monitor $159.05 @ Amazon
Keyboard Redragon - K552-R KUMARA Wired Gaming Keyboard $39.03 @ Amazon
Mouse Logitech - G502 Proteus Spectrum Wired Optical Mouse $54.11 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1089.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-26 11:09 EST-0500

Note: My prices never include Mail-In-Rebates unless specifically requested.

  • CPU: This is pretty high end as far as AMD desktop goes. The 2600 is also a fine choice for a gamer, but I feel the extra cores/threads will give this one a little more longevity. Nice thing is, next gen Ryzen processors should be drop in replacements. So if in a year you want to upgrade you will have that option.
  • Cooler: Sticking with the integrated cooler for now. It is perfectly serviceable. Maybe a little noisier than desired under load, but less so than the GPU, so it doesn't really matter. No air cooler will do better till you get into the $50+ range (And probably more like $70). So there is no need to get a Hyper 212 or anything like that.
  • MOBO: This is a bargain choice. It has plenty of connections for anything you need now, and has room for expansion if needed in the future. It does support m.2 drives as well.
  • RAM: Cheapest 3000mhz kit. This should be just fine. Don't forget to enable the XMP profile in the motherboard. It will default to a slower speed (2666mhz) for compatibility reasons at first.
  • SSD: I would rather have a really big OS drive than 2 separate drives myself. For games it won't matter either way, but it is more of a pain to re-install windows to a new OS drive than it is to drop in a data drive later. This SSD has RGB, but I don't think you will be able to drive them unfortunately. It doesn't matter as I was just looking for a cheap 1TB drive. There are faster ones, but once you are in this speed range good luck detecting the difference in something other than a benchmark. (Do you really think you can tell the difference between 9 seconds and 10 seconds? Is that worth another $50 - $100?)
  • HDD: None for now. Drop in a data drive as needed.
  • GPU: Definitely consider the rx 590. But it should only be a 2-5% improvement over the 580. So I just stuck with it. There is room in your budget for whatever you want here, but for 1080p gaming the 580 should be fine.
  • Case: It is cheap. Has good frontal airflow. Has a window. It is smaller than most mid towers. Consider picking up a cheaper "airflow" focused fan for rear exhaust. (Fans can be static pressure focused which is good for radiators or pulling air through filters, they can be Airflow optimized where they work best with no impediments but tend to move more air than SP fans, and then there are some balanced approach ones which don't do great at either but function okay).
  • PSU: This is a good power supply. Power supplies are important, don't skimp on quality here. A good, high quality power supply can be with you for more than 10 years! A bad power supply can catch fire, or just flat out ruin your very sensitive computer components. This is one of the venerable Capstone power supplies series sold under the Rosewill brand. Johnny Guru took a look at the platform back in 2014 and gave the 1000w version a 9 out of 10. This is very good. Consider an upgrade to a fully modular unit for about $20 more like this or this.
  • Monitor: Okay, you WILL be gaming at 1080P. I just don't think you can get into 1440p in this price point. How about you do it in STYLE though. This is a freesync monitor with a range from 48-75hz. This means as long as the FPS isn't dipping below 48fps, you should have a very buttery-smooth gaming experience. No tearing, judder or ghosting. This is also an IPS panel. Generally TN panels are faster, but this one is rated up to 75hz, and that should be fine. You can look into faster refresh rate TN panels if you want.
  • Keyboard: I have no personal experience with this brand, but they seem to have decent reviews and several users on these forums use and like them. It IS a mechanical key switch. This is my preferred keyboard type (I am never going back to rubber dome BS). $50 is a very cheap entry into the mechanical KB world, so it seems like a winner.
  • Mouse: Mouse is one of those very subjective things. This mouse is large. Many mice are purposefully small. I prefer a larger mouse so I can rest my hand on it comfortably. The sensor is very very good and accurate. You can customize the weight as well.

Whew...hope that helps! Enjoy your build. No matter what it is going to be awesome!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking to possibly upgrade from old build - any advice/recommendations?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Nope, I think you are still good to go. Only upgrade you can/should consider is GPU. The only reason why I would consider that is if you want to explore 1440p gaming.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $706.98 @ Newegg
Monitor Acer - XB271HU bmiprz 27.0" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor $599.99 @ Newegg Business
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1306.97
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-26 02:28 EST-0500

Really a 2070 would be fine for 1440p. You can also go with a vega 56 and a cheaper but still good freesync monitor. Plus NVidia is starting to support some freesync monitors.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Before I start buying things"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Your public saved builds are:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $164.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX AM4 Motherboard $123.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $99.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston - A400 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $32.52 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $44.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card PowerColor - Radeon RX 580 8 GB Red Devil Video Card $194.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case $75.90 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - BQ 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $61.86 @ Monoprice
Case Fan Corsair - CO-9050016-RLED 52.19 CFM 120mm Fan $19.55 @ OutletPC
Case Fan Corsair - CO-9050016-RLED 52.19 CFM 120mm Fan $19.55 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $838.22
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-26 02:23 EST-0500

and

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $164.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX AM4 Motherboard $123.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $115.98 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial - BX500 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $33.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $44.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB GAMING Video Card $274.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $74.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply BitFenix - Formula Gold 450 W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply $63.80 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $897.61
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-26 02:23 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RTX 2070 Multi GPU Setup"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

For your application, would it be better if the CPU ran faster, or had more cores? If you want faster single core performance, nothing beats intel (for now). I would think machine learning workloads would favor more cores. In that case I would do something from team red like the following:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Threadripper 1950X 3.4 GHz 16-Core Processor $589.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Deepcool - Fryzen 64 CFM CPU Cooler $82.14 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte - X399 DESIGNARE EX ATX TR4 Motherboard $384.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $379.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Team - T-FORCE DELTA RGB 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $104.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - 4 TB 3.5" 5900RPM Internal Hard Drive -
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500i (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case $94.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 1600 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $299.31 @ Amazon
Case Fan Corsair - SP140 49.49 CFM 140mm Fan $15.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fan Corsair - SP140 49.49 CFM 140mm Fan $15.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fan Corsair - SP140 49.49 CFM 140mm Fan $15.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2484.05
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-25 21:15 EST-0500

Keep in mind, this CPU is a little older, so you can always spring for a more modern WX series Threadripper instead. 16 cores processing 32 threads is nothing short of a miracle at this price point though.

The SSD doesn't matter all that much, I just selected a large, cheap one. For the price of a 512GB Samsung 970 pro you can get a cheaper 2TB SSD if you want. I threw in a 4TB drive as well. Really the drives are the least exciting/important part of the build, and aside from the boot drive you can add them at will. Like TheShadowGuy I went with an outsized power supply to make sure you had enough PCIE connections. 2070's have an 8 pin connector and this PSU has Plenty of those.

The case is well reviewed and ventillated. I added some 140mm Corsair static pressure fans for you to mount to the front.

This "Fryzen" cooler that is very good. All the TR4 water coolers have issues for now. So we will need to wait for a reasonable one to be released. I would keep it on air anyway, and this cooler will work even up to the monster 32 core 64 thread WX chip.

Building should be painless in the NZXT case because it has plenty of room to route cables, and you hide them all in a messy clump behind the PSU shroud anyway.

Let me know if you have any questions! Happy building!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I'm looking to build an AM4 small form factor"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

For smaller form factor I went with this InWin 301 case. This is because any smaller and components start getting more expensive. (MiniItx MOBOs, SFF power supplies, SFF coolers that are worth a damn, cases, etc)

You can easily fit something liek this in your budget, or even the 2700. The stock cooler is actually pretty damn good, but you can always add an aftermarket cooler later.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $164.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $83.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $114.99 @ Newegg
Case Inwin - 301 Black MicroATX Mini Tower Case $75.90 @ Amazon
Case Fan Apevia - 312L-CRD 57.67 CFM 120mm Fans $18.94 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $458.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-25 00:03 EST-0500

You want fast RAM. You can get a 3000mhz kit for under $100 if you wanted to save some room in your budget. This case is pretty tight, and really screams for an AIO cooler for your CPU. There is certainly room in your budget for an aftermarket AIO. I would get an RGB one to make the internals pop through the tempered glass. The case comes with no fans so I added a 3 pack of SUPER low budget LED fans. Stick two on the bottom for intake and one on the rear for exhaust.

If you DO want to go smaller, then consider the absolutely tiny Silverstone Rvz01b-e. This version will take your power supply, but there won't be room for your 3.5inch 1TB drive. The case has support for up to 3 2.5inch drives so you can always add some SSD's or 2.5inch hdd's. Like this Laptop HDD

The newest variant of that case is this: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/RgVBD3/silverstone-rvz03b-mini-itx-desktop-case-rvz03b. I don't know what they changed.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is a 450W power supply enough for this build?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

It will be enough

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A question about CPU and GPU"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Here is one option, though I will say I have seen other options cheaper recently: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qJ448d/adata-ultimate-su650-960-gb-25-solid-state-drive-asu650ss-960gt-r

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A question about CPU and GPU"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

No, I mean find a 1tb SSD as close to $70 (which you are spending anyway) as you can get. You can always add a 1, 2, 3, or 4tb HDD as needed for space. Then it is just shutdown, plug in the new drive, and boot back up. Rather than run out of space on your 256gb SSD and have to migrate to a new boot drive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A question about CPU and GPU"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

I recommend getting the cheapest 1tb drive you can find instead of your SSD HDD combo... You can always add drives later, migrating to a new os drive is a pain in the ***.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A question about CPU and GPU"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

GPU brand doesn't matter per say. They use identical GPU chips from the manufacturer (AMD in this case). Now, they can either be a reference design, which means the build exactly to AMD specification, or they can be aftermarket or non-reference design. The design can sometimes be optimized for certain applications. (Maybe small form factor, maybe bad airflow, maybe well vented case, or maybe a compromise that masters none of those).

Long answer to a short question I know. Basically the reference design is usually optimized for big OEMs like Dell or HP. These cases usually have bad airflow. Therefore, aftermarket designs take advantage of the fact that custom cases can vent much better, and you can throw more heat into the case. That means they can remove heat faster, which leads to less thermal throttling, but more case heat. As long as you can get the heat out it won't be an issue at all, and you get "free" performance improvement over reference. For cases like we suggest, I usually order by Price and get the cheapest one with a decent heatsink.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ready to build...Final opinions/advice?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

The reviews on amazon are basically if it works it is a damn beast. If it doesn't work....good luck with customer service. Their motto seems to be "We're not happy, until you're not happy!!" lolz.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ready to build...Final opinions/advice?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

I have used several m.2 SSD's. They come in two variants. PCIe and SATA. This leads to confusion because some m.2 motherboard slots only support one or the other. I would say you won't run into this on any modern board, they learned that lesson.

Anyway, the SATA m.2 slot is the same as using a SATA port on your motherboard. In fact, using it will invariably disable a SATA port on your motherboard. (They usually make this crystal clear in the manual). The good part is, you don't have to run a SATA cable and separate power cable. I did a build in a Silverstone RVZ01B-E, and I went with a SATA m.2 SSD to reduce the number of cable runs I had to do. I only needed a single PCIe power plug for the GPU and the normal 8 pin CPU + 20Pin MOBO connectors. Every bit helps in that small a form factor.

PCIe m.2 SSD's are referred to as NVMe versions. These can be faster than standard SATA, but that obviously depends upon the hardware involved. How much faster? Would you ever notice the difference? I don't know, it probably depends upon workload. Anyway, using one of these can reduce the total number of PCIe lanes available because that is a set number. Not a big deal as most "prosumers" don't use multi-GPU configurations anymore.

If you are giving of your time to help people out, I thought it was important you knew the distinction. If you want to limit searches on PCPP, it is under the "Intervace" filter. NVMe is M.2 (M) and SATA is M.2 (B+M).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ready to build...Final opinions/advice?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Go for 1440p in your budget please :).

The build as speced will be fine I am sure.

Note:

  • CPU: For the same price you can get a 16 thread AMD chip....This unlocked i5 WILL clock higher, and that should matter the most for maximum FPS for now. I'm just offering up the red option :)
  • Cooler: holy **** that is expensive for a cooler. I have come full circle having dealt with many closed loop issues. I now think big air is a better choice if you won't be shipping the system.
  • MOBO: NICE!!!
  • RAM: Great price on that RGB kit. I would buy it right now. It will work no matter what.
  • SSD: That T-FORCE SSD has very very few motherboards on the QVL, so I would make sure yours is on it!!!! Other wise, no RGB control. They have a 960GB version for like $120. I would strongly recommend taht for your boot drive.
  • Storage: Should be fine. Maybe leave it out for now if you go with the 1TB main drive. Prices should come down over time so when you end up needing the 2TB drive maybe you can get a 3 or 4TB for the same price.
  • GPU: that is a beautiful card at an excellent price!
  • Case: Esh, that is pricey for a micro-atx case. Plus it isn't all that small. Consider the InWin 301 as well. They come with zero (zip, zilch, nada) fans, so you can get whatever you want. Case price plus fans MIGHT be a wash, but I found this 5 pack of ****** apevia white LED fans on here for like $30. Excellent value.
  • PSU: In this price point it is a VERY VERY good option.
  • Monitor: meh, 1080p. Here is a 27inch IPS, gsync monitor, only $600 ugh: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ttnG3C/acer-monitor-xb271hubmiprz. The latest NVidia driver is supposed to be compatible with FreeSync monitors. Might be worth looking into for value.
  • Keyboard: No comment. I know nothing about it at all.
  • Mouse: I have this mouse. It is VERY small. My hands aren't huge and I still think the damn thing is tiny. Recommend larger logitech mice like the G500s. There are several others in a similar form factor that should work fine as well. It offers more options if you claw or palm grip.

Just my observations and $.02. Like I said, if you are committed to the build you have, you will be very very happy I am sure.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "BEST $2,500 4k Gaming PC?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

They will all perform similarly. Within a couple FPS of each other as long as the cooler is decent. I went with a cheap 3 fan cooler version, it is the same GPU chip though.

The Asus card does have integrated RGB as well.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "BEST $2,500 4k Gaming PC?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

lol, that's what I was gonna say!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "BEST $2,500 4k Gaming PC?"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

For 4k you will be "GPU bound". Which means almost all processors > $150 perform about the same. Just FYI.

That means you can get into an AMD system and save a little money with near 0 performance drop. Stash the savings, and buy the next "best NVidia GPU" you can get later, and sell your 2080 ti to help.

This year SHOULD see the release of Navi from AMD. That will not affect you because they are going to be releasing 1080p/1440p monsters rather than anything that will be great at 4k. (This is all rumor and speculation at this point). Only thing I could imagine happening is the price draw down at the middle of the stack sucks down the top. That added to the fact that NVidia should release an RTX 3080 ti or some such at some point, and that will net you SOME performance gain at 4k.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $260.98 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $97.49 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - Fatal1ty X470 Gaming K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $142.50 @ Newegg Business
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $119.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Team - T-FORCE DELTA RGB 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $129.99 @ Newegg
Storage Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K4000 4 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $96.39 @ Amazon
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB GAMING AMP Video Card $1299.99 @ Newegg Business
Case NZXT - H500 (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case $76.15 @ Newegg Business
Power Supply BitFenix - Whisper M 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2313.47
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-17 12:41 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming PC that can handle High Demand graphics and Livestreaming to YT"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

I really like most of Brett_5s's build, but I saw some places I would make changes:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $260.98 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $97.49 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - X470 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard $133.55 @ Newegg Business
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $119.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Team - L5 LITE 3D 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card PowerColor - Radeon RX VEGA 64 8 GB LIQUID Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design - Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case $44.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.89 @ OutletPC
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $108.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1515.64
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-17 11:38 EST-0500

Now it really depends upon what games you are playing if the liquid cooled Vega 64 will perform better or worse than the 2070. They tend to trade blows. At the same price point ($499) I would choose team Red. If there was a difference in price, I would go with the cheaper option. In addition, the liquid cooled version will be quieter than a standard GPU.

No matter what you need a multi-core CPU to handle the streaming part. While speed is important, core count actually matters a little more.

Noise will be important to you if you are streaming with a mic. Don't want a loud system to be overheard. Every component I picked was with that in mind.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "For the Mom"

  • 12 months ago
  • 2 points

Get the highest thread count you can. That will give it legs.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2400G 3.6 GHz Quad-Core Processor $159.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $69.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 8 GB (1 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $47.99 @ Newegg
Storage Team - L5 LITE 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $52.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fractal Design - Core 1000 USB 3.0 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $45.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair - CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $49.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $426.73
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-13 20:29 EST-0500

Note: My prices never include Mail-In-Rebates unless specifically requested.

  • CPU: This is a quad core cpu just like the Ryzen 3, only hyper-threaded.
  • Cooler: The stock cooler will do just fine!
  • MOBO: Pretty low end really. But you just won't need much. This should fulfill every basic requirement you could have.
  • RAM: A single stick so you can easily upgrade later. 8GB should be plenty.
  • SSD: Any cheap SSD will do. This size should give you enough room for now.
  • GPU: The CPU has integrated graphics so you don't need to invest in a graphics card.
  • Case: Mini-Itx cases are generally smaller, and they allow for smaller motherboards. This cases is larger, but cheaper, and micro atx motherboards are cheaper than mini itx motherboards as well. This case is okay (for the price), and it should give a blank canvas to your sis for modification!
  • PSU: Lower end power supply, but semi-modular so it is easier to work with. Decent enough for the load you will be putting it under.

It is certainly possible to go cheaper than this. Cases can be had for $20, you can drop down to the Ryzen 3. You can get a cheaper motherboard by about $12 or so. Might require a bios update to support the Newer ryzen processors, but that is fine because AMD will loan you a single core processor for the task. You can go with a smaller SSD or HDD. Sufficient power supplies would cost around $30. I just happen to think the upgrades are very worth it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1,850 to 2,000 Euro - Mini Form/ Portable - Gaming/ Streaming/ Future Proof PC - 1440p / 165 Frames / Medium to High Quality"

  • 12 months ago
  • 1 point

Holy crap, smaller than a node 202? No. Not for gaming/streaming/overclocking. Hell, I wouldn't overclock in a node 202 , there just isn't enough airflow in those tiny cases.

Maybe a laptop would be a better fit? Then you won't have to lug around a keyboard, mouse, and monitor on the airplane, you can bet that won't fit in the overhead bin :)

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube