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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New build opinions please"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

With streaming in the mix, how about a Ryzen 2700X. Only 35 quid more for:

  • 2 additional physical cores / 16 threads of multi-threaded performance which comfortably manages simultaneous workloads with the likes of gaming and streaming. In other others lesser performance hit on the gaming side.

  • bundles in a pretty solid functioning stock cooler (worth around £30).

  • excellent value!!

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor £145.98 @ Aria PC
Motherboard MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £79.98 @ CCL Computers
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £58.99 @ Overclockers.co.uk
Storage Corsair MP510 480 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £61.63 @ CCL Computers
Video Card Asus Radeon RX 570 4 GB ROG STRIX Video Card £130.00 @ AWD-IT
Case Cooler Master MasterBox NR600 (w/o ODD) ATX Mid Tower Case £69.88 @ More Computers
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £61.97 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £608.43
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-15 15:25 GMT+0000

You mentioned £90 for the GPU - this brings the total to around £568, hence feel free to opt for the tomahawk motherboard and adds case fans.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is the Gammax GTE a better cooler than the stock 3600X cooler"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

I never did look into what splits the GT/GTE models until now. I guess the curiosity got the better of me.

Although it's not entirely clear from the products description i did gather the following:

  • The GT variant supports an RGB wire controller too (not needed if using Mobo RGB software)

  • The GT variant also adds RGB to the "deepcool" logo on the top black plate

I guess if achievable for the same price or less, grab the GT. Double check the difference as I just ran through the product spec/descriptions in a jiffy.

EDIT: Wonderful! Mark5916 has already covered some of the above

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Put together a budget PC in October, won a 2080 Ti a month later and unsure"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

I think the main thing I care about is the refresh rate

Definitely 1440p (2560x1440) 144hz. With a 2080 TI this type of resolution delivers a sweet balance between ultra quality game configurations + higher FPS gains (120-144fps+).

OPTIONAL: 1440p ultra wide (3440x1440) will subtract around 20-25% performance. Which is also a fantastic option if you prefer a large/wider panel. In my experience, anything in the 90-120fps bracket is perfect.

4K on the other hand subtracts around 55% of those desirable FPS earnings. The rendering demand at this resolution is far from favouring higher FPS achievements unless you're looking to down-tune visual quality configurations. The worst of it is, premium 4K higher refresh rate panels are extremely expensive and with this sort of compromise at play, IMO, it's not worth it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Put together a budget PC in October, won a 2080 Ti a month later and unsure"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

The estimated wattage is usually over-stated and 550W is sufficient for this sort of build (incl. the 2080 ti). My current build is estimated @ 525w and yet even with 5Ghz OC achieved with a 7700K, i'm barely touching on 400w.

I won a 2080 Ti

AWESOME!!! :) Best gaming GPU currently available!! Hope you're targeting higher resolution gaming with higher refresh rates to get the best out of it.

I am wondering if I should consider selling and upgrading the CPU & motherboard (and probably the PSU as well since I'm guessing 550W is cutting close even for the 3600 and 2080 Ti) or if this is fine as is.

You're not going to see much difference in performance with switching CPUs (esp. hi-res gaming). The 3600 is a solid performing candidate, even with a 2080 TI in the bag. If the enthusiasm desires more cores or faster performance, wait for Ryzen 4000 CPUs which are expected in mid-2020. Or, even better, considering the 3600 chip is a whopper for gaming - wait for Zen 4 @ 2021.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need GPU advice please"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Either an AMD RX 570 for around $110-$130 or the same model from the used market for around $70-$80. Other used option - RX 580/GTX 1060 or anything above this range if achievable for under a 100 (or a little more).

The RX 570 will comfortably support 1080p 60fps gaming - either via ultra game settings in lesser demanding titles or a mix of medium-top settings in more graphically challenging games

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build Need Suggestions"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are comfortable with a $1200 spend:

  • The stock cooler on the 3600 is pants and will compromise performance to an extent. More alarmingly, on load the fan ramps up like a 6th Battalion jet engine which can be heard from a far far far away galaxy. Hence an aftermarket cooler! Alternatively a Ryzen 3600X with a semi-decent bundled in cooler (a little loud for my personal liking but workable).

  • 3rg GEN Ryzen CPUs are "RAM" frequency/bandwidth hungry. The faster the ram the greater the potential to hit the 3600's rated boost clock. 3600Mhz added

  • You can't go without an SSD!! Hard drives nowadays are only fit for secondary storage solutions but for the boot drive you'll end up bottlenecking the CPU. Essentially what you get with an SSD is significantly faster windows boot times, app/games load times, mammothly superior transfer speeds, etc. Moreover, nowadays enterprise level (NVME Pcie X4) superior performance is achievable for a similar cost (compared to traditional SATA-driven SSDs) hence more power in the tank. You could potentially save money here, by opting for a 240GB/500GB SSD for the OS and applications and pop everything else on a secondary HD drive - only 1TB of NVME SSD for $100 is a tough one to pass if you have the means to grab one.

  • A better quality PSU is definitely in order. You can't skimp on the juicer if you're targeting a performance build. The BQ's are better tailored for lower power consumption builds. Also you might fancy something fully modular with flat cables for easier cable management (it does come at a cost though). These higher grade units run more efficiently, host newer capacitors, accommodate finer protection features and the general build quality is more robust/durable. If you want something affordable there are decent semi mod units with the likes of: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/3hkwrH/corsair-power-supply-cp9020102na or the 650w variant for $10 more.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.98 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ B&H
Video Card Gigabyte Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB GAMING OC Video Card $419.99 @ Amazon
Case Cougar MX330 ATX Mid Tower Case $44.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Keyboard Logitech G Pro Wired Gaming Keyboard $79.99 @ Best Buy
Mouse Logitech G203 Prodigy Wired Optical Mouse $18.99 @ Dell
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1181.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-14 13:27 EST-0500

You still have $20 before the 1200 limit. Maybe a better quality case with tempered glass? The MX330 is a nice budget case but the acrylic glass scratches easily and from an aesthetics point of view the external body does feel a little plasticy. Back in the day (well about a year or so ago), the MX330's value proposition was fantastic as tempered glass case options were difficult to locate below the $100 asking price. Now you've got a bunch of glass options in the $50-$80 range which do make a nice investment providing any features are in full force (esp. airflow). I'll leave this one to you.... acrylic panels aint that bad - had a few of these in the past.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel Core i5-9400F or the Ryzen 5 2600x?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

lol, no!

Not sure if that was a compliment or a dig :/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "b450 - let's talk about the b450 mobo conclusively"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

the most important question is are there any companies or computers from companies that uses the 'b450' mobo?

Yes. This includes our partner IMG/Graphics design firm, wife's clothing business and a couple of retained business clients where part selection/upgrading/building from scratch services are provided.

The B450 chipset is capable of supporting both consumer and business requirements. Heftier server space or workstation class builds requiring greater possibilities with I/O functionality, higher memory capacities, higher core count CPUs, multiple GPU support, etc etc are more likely to shift past "consumer-level" motherboards for enterprise-level chipsets. What makes the B450 chipset special is "VALUE" or "sufficient" features/functionality for most workloads (personal/business related). Not everyone needs or can afford a 128GB RAM arrangement, a 16 core+ CPU or 64 PCIe lane I/O fest, etc. This is where the B450 holds true to a middle-ground between consumer and enterprise edition platforms and for most plenty the B450 chipset offers abundant functionality.

I'm not going to go through all the 1-41 pointers as some of these are irrelevant/time-consuming. This is something that should be queried in set portions and taken in lengthier strides. The best method being - reversing the procedural query. Start from the achievable end-result and work your way backwards in identifying which parts are best suited. This requires sharing your intended purpose of use, your current and forthcoming upgrade requirement and budget capacity. This reversed method works because there are irrepressibly ample options available and you want to narrow down on the possibilities quickly, within a realm of options which are more practical and easier to follow. For someone who is not familiar with internal workings of hardware, the idea of resorting to info magna-maniac data-sheets will only digress the attempt into further disarray............. This is where these wonderful online communities come into play (eg. PCPP). Consider the members in the forum as your walking and talking LIVE datasheets who will respond with more practical and relevant developments rather then throwing you into a cesspool of miscellaneous specifications. Once you get the hang of the basics you can then view specific options with greater depth.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is the Gammax GTE a better cooler than the stock 3600X cooler"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Whether it's the GTE/GT - with 4 liquid heatpipes, chunkier heatsink and a larger static pressure fan.....it's considerably better. The stock wraith spire is borderline adequate but undesirably loud when ramped up.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "b450 - let's talk about the b450 mobo conclusively"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

the most important question is are there any companies or computers from companies that uses the 'b450' mobo?

Yes. This includes our partner IMG/Graphics design firm, wife's clothing business and a couple of retained business clients where part selection/upgrading/building from scratch services are provided.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3600/3700x? B450/X570? And many other noob questions..."

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

My current PC is an i5 4690k, Kraken x61, G.Skill DDR3, Strix GTX970, MB Asus, 500go SSD Samsung Evo something, S340 and Corsair AX650. I bought everything in 2015 and this build is starting to show its limits

The 3600/3700X upgrade isn't necessarily going to make a huge difference. For a vast number of gaming titles the 4690K measures up almost at an equal footing. Granted, a select number of heavier higher core count utilising games are likely to see some favourable performance (5-10fps gains) but it's not enough to justify a full-swing upgrade.

Where you are most likely limited for performance, in terms of visual quality, is the graphics card. 1440p resolutions are more prone to the graphics rendering engine opposed to CPU clocks speeds.....and a 2015 i5's raw performance (FPS limiter) should easily allow you to play games on ultra settings in demanding games whilst securing 80-90fps (or 100fps+ with lesser graphically challenging titles).

Older systems are also likely to endure greater CPU resources with all the junk/bloat/hidden throttlers/etc piled up in operating system. Personally I'd look to a clean install of windows + a GPU upgrade (RTX 2070 SUPER/2080 SUPER) and give that a shot with your most played games. If things don't pan out as you expect, you can always opt for the CPU/MOBO/RAM upgrade at any time.

If all goes smoothly and you fancy something a little more versatile for the long run, i'd wait a little longer for RYZEN 4000-series which is expected in mid-2020.


For streaming, this can be achieved via the RTX cards hardware encoder.

For CPU software based encoding, the 3700X (or more desirably the 12 core 3900X) is better suited.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3700x in a H510 - Kraken x62 or Dark Rock / Dark Rock Pro 4?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The X62/DRP4 options add value if you're planning on overclocking the 3700X. The pickle being, Ryzen 3rd GEN CPUs are already capped out (oppressively binned) and overclocking achieves very little performance gains (at times inconsistently).

The preference with the 3700X is running the chip at stock and where boost clocks can maximise on the chips performance ceiling, let AMD's turbo auto-tuner 'precision boost' do its thing.

The stock cooler is adequate and does a good enough job if you're willing to give it a shot. If you're hoping to eliminate the ramped up noise levels, any of the following under $50 BEEFY options are fantastic for the task:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4TCrxr/thermalright-cpu-cooler-machorevb

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qs6BD3/thermalright-cpu-cooler-truespirit140power

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Zr2kcf/be-quiet-cpu-cooler-bk010

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/8GBrxr/scythe-mugen-5-rev-b-512-cfm-cpu-cooler-scmg-5100

Or if you fancy some RGB:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/bHcMnQ/cryorig-h7-quad-lumi-490-cfm-cpu-cooler-h7-quad-lumi

Other then that, if the X62/DRP4 is targeted on an aesthetics front, the DRP4 is the more durable and quieter solution but will over-shadow your RGB RAM sticks (will require additional case fans for front air intake). The X62 looks prettier for the RGB element and the stock fans on the Rad get a little loud on load (something remedied with quieter fan upgrades). In terms of thermals, both options deliver pretty much the same performance with the AIO possibly seeing a 0-2c advantage (which is not only negligible, but not worth pondering over considering both of these units are already overkill for a 3700X at stock+PB).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Build"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Is this something you've purchased already?

If purchased already the build looks fantastic. A $30 aftermarket cooler would do the Ryzen 3600 justice.

I didnt know if that was to much ram.

16GB is sufficient for gaming

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Suggestion for these two 1TB SSD"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Both are great, go with the cheapest.

If your motherboard supports M.2 SSDs, you might want to check the cost of M.2 SATA-driven or the faster NVME interface SSDs. Here in the UK (USA, and a host of other countries) these are similarly priced as their 2.5" SATA counterparts. https://pcpartpicker.com/products/internal-hard-drive/#i=83&A=800000000000,16000000000000&sort=price&page=1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel Core i5-9400F or the Ryzen 5 2600x?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The 2600X/AM4 value proposition is unmatched.

  • 15-30% faster multi-threaded rendering support

  • the above added multi-threaded compute performance also translates to greater game versatility/system sustainability in the long run (future proofing)

  • bundles in a pretty decent stock cooler

  • the AM4 platform sees plenty of value-packed upgrade possibilities (3rd GEN already available, 4th GEN coming soon subject to board compatibility)

  • Light OC possibilities available

In other words all the above in exchange for the i5's tiny increase in single threaded performance puts the 2600X in the driving seat! Granted, you might see an average of 5% fps performance gains in 1080p gaming but whether that's enough to annul the 2600X is down to user preference. To get the best of both worlds with the 2600X it only requires some light tinkering in visual quality configurations (without losing any noticeable visual quality) and BOOM 5% compensated!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Am I not living enough?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 4 points

Hold on.....

  • So you don't have those bad habits (drinking, smoking, etc)

  • You're "pretty popular at school"

  • You "get good grades" and you're "not socially awkward".

Mate, you're living the dream!!

You should be more worried about your friends who are under the impression drinking, drugs and chasing false hopes somehow equates to "living". With the above qualities secured, the question is not "how will I ever fit in?" but more..... "well i'm leading by example, how will they fit in?". At 16 you've got your priorities spot-on and you earn yourself the title "the shepherd"! As for the conformist misfits (the sheep), they can have their adversely driven ill-informed moments now but soon the alarm clocks gonna fire-up and "life" is gonna slap them in the face (rude awakening). Some will heal, some will find a thwarting balance and then a bunch of them will be left begging the question "Am I not living enough?"....and don't be surprised if you pop up in their minds as "The 16 year old AwesomeBuilderXE1901, the one who got it right the first time".

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Multiple RGB fans to the motherboard"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually can you link me up with the product page or copy and paste what is included in the kit.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Multiple RGB fans to the motherboard"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

How would you connect multiple rgb fans to only a couple rgb headers on the motherboard.

I'm assuming your fan kit comes with a "fan hub" too. All the fans will connect to the hub and the hub will plug onto one of the motherboards FAN headers.

The same principle applies to the RGB connectors. All the fans RGB connectors will hook up to a single splitter/extension cable/hub (this should be included in the kit) with the primary end hooked up to one of the RGB headers on the mobo.

I had a quick look into some of the finer details both on the board and fan features. What you have there is an addressable RGB fan kit. For this sort of functionality make sure to connect your RGB cable to the +5v addressable 3-pin header on the motherboard. This is labelled "JRAINBOW1". The motherboard in question supports one (phew!). The mobo also supports 2 additional 4-pin 12v RGB headers - avoid these. Again emphasising "use the JRAINBOW 3-pin header on the mobo"

Keep in mind each fan carries 2 cables (pre-attached). One for the RGB element (3-pin connector) and the second to power up the fan (PWM 4-pin connector). If it's your first time working with this sort of thing, it can be a little baffling. Some of the other cables thrown in (accessories) are either adapters or extensions for the RGB cables / 3-pin PWM power cables.

The wired RGB controller won't be needed as your motherboard supports a 5V addressable header. Once hooked up, download MSI's RGB software to drive your RGB preferences. The software makes life so much easier as the wired RGB button controller is burdensome and in most cases will require opening up the case to access it's functions. The software on the other hand throws in a more user friendly experience and possibly some additional features to get more out of the individually addressable RGB arrangement.

I also am getting an rgb cooler if that affects it.

Gammax GT would be a good option. Same brand as the case fans + same CF120s RGB fan. If you prefer a matching contrast of this sort this would be the way to go about it. Other brands may lock your RGB functionality outside of the addressable RGB zone or may force downloading the cooler manufacturers software controller. To avoid driver conflicts (it does happen occasionally), make sure you purchase something which is compatible with the MSI motherboards RGB software.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Normal temperature for throttling Xeon E3-1231V3"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

It's a likely culprit. Haswell CPUs are hotties (not the head-turning type hehe) and being you've stuck with a lower heat dissipating heatsink, over-time the TIM is likely to lose effectiveness.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help understand Motherboard FSB with CPU GHz"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Good catch! +1

.....would have been infuriated had the inquirer made the purchase and ended up with a dud.

To the OP: 870 baptised chipsets are optimised across both AM3/AM3+ platforms hence the mix-up. This pretty much nullifies the upgrade path on the same board and gives rise to the second full package upgrade: AM4 socket board + more recent CPU + RAM

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If it's down to gaming alone....from a future-proof perspective, the 3600 measures up equally in terms of raw performance. The higher propelled instruction clock cycles with 3rd GEN Ryzen secures greater versatility with flexible resolutions/in-game configurations whilst maintaining higher FPS counts. Granted, a 2nd GEN 8-core CPU, although not as effective in FPS single-threaded performance, does by design add greater compute resources at the "system consistency level" but by the time the 3600's compute resources are made redundant, you'd fancy an upgrade anyway (4/5yrs+).

Where the 2700X excels, or is favoured, are workloads which are more multi-core/thread contingent (rendering, streaming, virtualization, etc etc).

Probably gonna go with the 2600x or 3600

Both are great options for lesser core-invasive workloads. Personally if I were buying new today (strictly gaming), i'd fancy going the 2600X route and save the budget proceeds for an earlier upgrade with DDR5 platforms (or Ryzen 4000 if performance gains are significantly impressive). Or, for a trapped long-term investment, the Ryzen 3600.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help understand Motherboard FSB with CPU GHz"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

What are you looking to spend for a decent upgrade?

If it's in the realm of ~$50 (or a little more), a "used" FX-8350 does considerably better on the same platform. Keep in mind although you'll have more cores with more generous CPU resources, an AM3 peaked FX chip belongs to the older AMD GEN family and lacks much of the advances seen with more RECENT offerings (with the likes of Ryzen 1st, 2nd and now 3rd gen). The under $50 solution should only be sought if you're unable to raise a higher budget.

If the budget is in excess of $250 (going new), you'll want to drop the AM3 socket all-together and grab a newer AM4 motherboard ($70-$100), a significantly faster current GEN CPU (preferably Ryzen 2000-series, $70-$110) + compatible DDR4 RAM (depending on capacity, $35-$55). The performance benefits are astronomical by comparison and unlike the AM3 platform, which is technically in survival-mode, the AM4 socket's subsistence is abundantly open for many years to come. If your requirements are "basic" by design (general tasks which don't require much power), there is a more affordable solution with a dual-core 3000G CPU ($50), a decent AM4 board ($70) + 8GB RAM ($35) which comes to a total of $155. This solution leaves plenty of headroom on top for earlier upgrades should it comes to that.

EDIT: IGNORE THE CPU UPGRADE PARA ...... FX series chips are incompatible!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Assuming overclocking is not required (not fitting for the budget anyway).

INTEL ROUTE

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $199.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte Z390 GAMING X ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $149.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Flare X 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage Corsair MP510 480 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $64.98 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $239.99 @ Best Buy
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $999.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-10 17:00 EST-0500

AMD ROUTE

  • The Ryzen 3600 enables multi-threaded support. Better long-term futureproof investment. Both CPU's at stock are practically at par in terms of game performance, only the Ryzen chip delivers greater compute resources which already proving beneficial in games in other productivity workloads.

  • The AMD (Ryzen) platform also see's another upgrade series expected in 2020 (Ryzen 4000 CPUs). Again adding excellent value for long term upgrades.

  • Thanks to AMD's best value propositions - this also leaves a little headroom in the budget to grab a 1TB NVME SSD (double the storage).

  • Side Note: Both builds deliver a GTX 1660 SUPER GPU. Plenty of power to fire up 1080p demanding games at the best of settings whilst maintaining a healthy 90-110fps score (this type of performance, assuming the displays refresh rate is capable, secures really smooth frame feeds for excellent image quality). Or, 110-140fps in lesser demanding games. Although intel CPUs will deliver a little added advantage in most games but in the long run games will favour "greater CPU resources" over "marginally faster clockspeeds".

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Adorama
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $239.99 @ Best Buy
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1004.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-10 17:12 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "VR gaming and video editing"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Assuming the budget is directed @ the build alone (incl. the OS):

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ Best Buy
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $129.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $108.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1502.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-10 16:31 EST-0500

An 8-core Ryzen 3700X paired up with a RTX 2070 SUPER gets the ball rolling very nicely for higher refresh rating gaming/VR. Plenty of performance for video editing with the CPU's multi-threaded capabilities + 32GB RAM and a mammoth GPU for graphics rendering (effects/previews/etc).

There are scalable options for either 1) a 12 core Ryzen 3900X CPU, or 2) the RTX 2080 SUPER graphics card. This is down to user preference/requirements. The 12 core CPU reels in faster rendering times in video editing workflows and the 2080 SUPER graphics card delivers 15-18% performance gains in gaming.

To see where we are with the budget and possibilities:

  1. WIFI required?

  2. Were the peripherals included in the budget? (display, mouse, keyboard, etc).

  3. Was the Windows operating system included in the budget? (already added)

  4. If you see yourself upgrading on the same platform with higher core count CPUs in mind, you might fancy grabbing a beefier X570 motherboard. If your video editing workloads are of the casual nature, the 3700X is plenty. If you're working with 4K projects or want something a little more serious for high-demand professional rendering - the 3900X/3950X route is feasible within the $2000 range. Let me know your thoughts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

It's just a CPU from another manufacturer and has no impact on how you use the machine. What I'll do is provide 2 options, one with an AMD CPU and the other with an intel one. I'll drop a comparison in terms of performance too.

First,

  1. Do you need a copy of Windows? Or have you got one already?

  2. Does the $1000 budget include the display, mouse, keyboard, etc?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

with AMD flooring intel on a number of levels, is there any room for a 3rd GEN Ryzen CPU? Unless overclocking is a key driver for the intel route, RYZEN makes sense when considering value, SMT performance + the inclusion of a decent stock cooler.

Is that 1K in US/GBP/CAD/etc?

operating system needed? (Windows)

Peripherals needed? (display/mouse/keyboard/etc)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need advice for changing CPU Cooler for i7 8700k Liquid and Air Cooler"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I never overclock my cpu....

If overclocking will remain on the side-lines don't bother with the $80+ options (whether air-cooled/AIO).

Any of the following options (under $50) is already beefy enough:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/TsL7YJ/thermalright-cpu-cooler-machodirect

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/8GBrxr/scythe-mugen-5-rev-b-512-cfm-cpu-cooler-scmg-5100

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4TCrxr/thermalright-cpu-cooler-machorevb

NOTE If your current RAM sticks are stacked with a tall heatsink you'll want to check for clearance. If you've got something like the Corsair Vengeance LPX (low-down modules) you're already in the clear.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My AMD Build"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

lol likely-so.....i prefer laying out the baseline 1080p 60hz example as there's been the odd occasion where i've experienced buyers targeting colossal rendering graphics horsepower for light-weight rendered capped frames. With a 2080 super in the bag, the initial assumption being the 1440p 144hz commoner or the e-sports competitive super-man reflex 1080p 240hz

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with first build?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Is there an RGB version of the CPU Cooler you listed?

Either of the following 2 (RGB) will do:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/WDPzK8/deepcool-gammaxx-gt-295-cfm-cpu-cooler-gammaxx-gt

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hHDJ7P/cooler-master-hyper-212-rgb-black-edition-573-cfm-cpu-cooler-rr-212s-20pc-r1

Is there a reason you changed the power supply?

The MWE from Cooler Master for the asking price doesn't fit the bill (i wouldn't pay more than $50-$60 for this sort of thing). Similarly priced units deliver much better overall performance and employ more quality-driven components for long term durability/reliability. One of them being capacitors. The poorer compact environment doesn't help with thermals either and although it's a gold rated unit it's more edging towards BRONZE with moderately decent efficiency. The FSP Hydro G on the other hand deploys a solid platform for a performance savvy build, a nice set up sharpened up protection features, great efficiency and uses higher quality Jap capacitors. To top it off.....adds flat sleeved cables for easier cable management which is very useful when organising the spaghetti clutter under the tight-spotted PSU shroud. the FSP also throws in an additional EPS connector (CPU power medium) - although not necessary but a nice option to have to share the power feed between the boards available 4-pin + 8-pin connector.

As for the keyboard, I am willing to spend whatever. Maybe around $150? RGB, yes. I do have smaller hands and I'm looking to play WoW. Not sure if those aspects matter.

Nice budget! If you're going for the Corsair mouse which locks you into using Corsairs RGB software you might as well grab a Corsair Mechanical keyboard to get everything synced up. Something like this : https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Rwc48d/corsair-k68-rgb-wired-gaming-keyboard-ch-9102010-na (added below)

$90 for the keyboard....saves you $60 from the $150 budget. You could grab a 8-core Ryzen 3700X. Essentially games are edging towards higher core count utilisation faster than we had imagined. What you could do is use the $60, save another $35 from the aftermarket cooler and grab the 3700X which comes with a pretty decent stock cooler (RGB enabled). That will look something like this: (incl. keyboard ---- about $20 over)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ Best Buy
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Adorama
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Monitor MSI Optix MAG241C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $204.43 @ Amazon
Keyboard Corsair K68 RGB Wired Gaming Keyboard $89.99 @ Amazon
Mouse Corsair SCIMITAR PRO RGB Wired Optical Mouse $49.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1761.30
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-10 15:01 EST-0500

The 3700X is not necessary but does offer the better future proof path unless you're already looking to upgrade earlier, adding credence to the 3600.

To get a glimpse of the 3700X's stock RGB cooler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUZGNA8-Dbg (not the quietest option but for a bundled cooler - great performance)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My AMD Build"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I think it would be easier if you could specify the following:

  1. Actual budget? Location (to determine currency)?

  2. Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

  3. If gaming, display resolution and refresh rate (eg. 1080p 60hz)

  4. Any particular preferences?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Normal temperature for throttling Xeon E3-1231V3"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Remove the cooler and re-apply the paste. When mounting the cooler back on make sure the cooler is making firm contact. These stock coolers are a little crappy but should keep you around the 80c mark. You always have the option of upgrading to an aftermarket cooler (higher TDP).

As for the thermal throttle mediation, it's possible you're seeing inaccurate readings. Consider setting BIOS to default and possibly grabbing a BIOS update if the issue continues after remounting.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with first build?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Should I get a cooler? Or is the stock okay?

The stock cooler will get the job done but does run a little loud for my personal liking. In fact, you'd be better off grabbing a RYZEN 3600 for $190 (only 2-3% drop in performance) with a $30-$35 beefier aftermarket cooler. The 3600X with the stock cooler has shown to limit performance by a similar performance discrepancy of 1-3%.

I'm also not entirely sure how rgb works.. is there a way I can incorporate more? Thanks!

To make it easier, you'll want to use the motherboards software controller for a universal sync. This simply requires downloading the application from the motherboards support page and then purchasing compatible hardware (RAM, fans, led strips, etc etc). The motherboards on-board RGB headers will be utilised when hooking up fans/led strips/etc.

Products like the Scimitar pro RGB mouse uses the manufacturers proprietary software. Again, as simple as downloading the package (Corsair iCue) and hooking up the mouse as usual and you're good to go.

Suggestions for a curved monitor?

The one you have added already is great!!

Suggestions for a gaming keyboard?

How much are you looking to spend? I take it, RGB is a requirement? Mechanical tactile keyboard? Any other preferences?


RECOMMENDED BUILD UPDATE:

  • A more quality driven PSU for powerhouse performance builds

  • Faster 3600Mhz 16CL RAM

  • The enterprise-level 970 evo SSD will have zero real-world tangible benefits for a gaming build hence save $50 here for a more game-suited fast NVME and place those funds towards a RTX 2070 SUPER graphics card. Essentially, 8-12% better performance in gaming (depending on title or game configuration), runs more efficiently and quieter + adds Ray Tracing to the package.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ Walmart
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Adorama
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Monitor MSI Optix MAG241C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $204.43 @ Amazon
Mouse Corsair SCIMITAR PRO RGB Wired Optical Mouse $49.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1586.30
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-10 13:10 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc build please examine my parts and see if there adaquite enogh"

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

Nope this is a major fail.....the fans are not expensive enough to cool the Windows operating system. Speaking of windows, did you forget to add the door?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions on an upgrade from a 7600k build."

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

At the time you purchased the machine, you were probably bang-on with the selection process. The 7600K's launch era sees intel vastly outperforming Ryzen (1000-series in 2017) in single threaded clockspeeds. I wouldn't have had it any other way unless higher core count workloads begged to differ. The OC headroom is a massive bonus on top. Actually I picked up a 7700K in 2017 (OC'd @ 5Ghz) and by today's standards it competes with the very best the market has on offer for gaming/image design and a ton of other 4c/8t canned workloads. In other words, I won't be upgrading anytime soon but will definitely keep tabs on the impending 4000 Ryzen (as always hoping for more significant uplifts in performance and who know might even skip 2020 for AMDs newer AM5 socket/etc). Apart from the "value" AMD brings to the table, in my personal opinion, only now with 3rd Gen Ryzen we are seeing profound possibilities hosting faster cores whilst maintaining a value-packed higher core count SMT package. Unlike before upgrading/building new now favours Ryzen more than ever hence......

I live with Intel guilt.

.....in other words, NO REGRETS :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions on an upgrade from a 7600k build."

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

For a more lucrative performance upgrade, yes you'll want to upgrade both the CPU and motherboard. The previous GEN Z270 chipset's upgrade path is limited to a 7700K and moving to a newer platform will open up greater opportunities (faster/higher core count options).

Whether it's worth upgrading is down to user requirement/performance targets. The 7600K remains effectively relevant with modern day demands in a ton of lesser core count intensive workloads, including gaming and the day-2-day. A handful of games scaling over 6/8 cores may relieve CPU resources from maxing out but not a whole lot to go on in terms of accumulate performance (fps).

Bottom line: If you're happy with the current performance, stick with it and look to Ryzen 4000-series CPU's which are expected to launch in mid-2020. If you feel it's time to move up the ladder or if your workloads are higher core count contingent, for a hands-on solution, a little more info would help (purpose of use?).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "List nearly completed! Opinions for MOBO?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Showing available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07VB2BG3X?tag=pcp0f-21&linkCode=ogi&th=1&psc=1

Otherwise, this one: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/BHBhP6/msi-b450-gaming-plus-max-atx-am4-motherboard-b450-gaming-plus-max (a couple of trimmed features which you might want to look into. otherwise a solid board for the 3600/3700X)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Memory sooed"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

How can I tell how fast memory I can put into my board.

Motherboard specifications. You can view these on the manufacturers website alongside your mobo model number.

What’s the fastest memory that will make a noticible difference in a workstation.

On the current dual channel memory architecture you'll want to stay between 3600Mhz-3733Mhz for best performance. 3600Mhz being the recommended sweet-spot. Hitting 3733Mhz or above kicks in the internal CPU memory divider which results to latency penalties and you end up with poorer performance.

3600Mhz 16/17CL does it nicely!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "bottleneck issues?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Is this a previously saved parts snapshot? current prices have driven down the 2700X to $250 CAD.....same applies to the GPU @ $350'ish.

The B450M-A is a barebone heatsink-less motherboard....likely to compromise the 2700X from hitting it's rated boost clock and running hot. Either something like this: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/dQgzK8/asrock-b450m-pro4-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-pro4 or PREFERABLY: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/9C97YJ/msi-b450m-gaming-plus-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-gaming-plus (both are mATX)

Also NVIDIA's newer 1660 super only trails by 2-3% when compared with the TI variant @ $310: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/Z3wkcf/msi-geforce-gtx-1660-super-6-gb-ventus-xs-oc-video-card-gtx-1660-super-ventus-xs-oc

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building a PC for my mom"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The 2700X is currently available on Amazon for $160 and it's an absolute steal if you ask me. Benefits:

  • multi-threaded 8-core faster rendering CPU (does wonders with project completion times)

  • Enough power in the tank to fire up 4K projects if it comes to that

  • Bundles in a very decent RGB cooler which retails for around $25/$30 (that alone makes the 2700X is MUST have)

  • 2nd Gen RYZEN achieves single threaded performance at par with the 9400F and drops it in it's path with 30% faster multi-threaded payloads.

To simplify, don't even bother going the intel route on this one.


For the GPU....this ones down to user requirement. Essentially a GPU will be required as the 2700X is absent of an integrated solution. If the video editing workloads are not GPU-specific there are options available in the $60-$90 realm. Regardless, being the RX 570 is achievable for around $120 and its what you have added above already, i'd stick with it. There are some useful features in video editing applications which makes use of GPU-accelerated processes or third party tool add-ons/special effect previews...hence a solid touching base mid-ranged editing card makes for a solid investment.


A couple of things i'd recommend:

  • Grab a MAX series B450 motherboard. These are MSI revisions updated with larger BIOS chips for 3rd GEN compatibility. Better candidates for 4000-series CPUs too which should be expected the following year. In other words, a more fruitfully feature-rich upgrade path for the long run.

  • To offset some of that cost, drop the 970 evo SSD. Won't have much impact in these types of workflows. Similarly FAST NVME SSDs will run just as effectively with next to zero noticeable performance disparity.

Build eg:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $159.99
Motherboard MSI B450M MORTAR MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $100.00
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $61.99 @ Amazon
Video Card XFX Radeon RX 570 4 GB RS XXX Video Card $119.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $511.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-08 20:18 EST-0500

note: the Micro-ATX MAX mobo is currently unavailable. If you're planning on waiting until Xmas before purchasing it would be a good idea to keep this on the tab. The board should cost around $100 although higher demand with short supply could raise the bar here to around $120. Worst case scenario, the regular B450s are good enough and will also support 3rd/4th GEN Ryzen CPUs via a BIOS update (future-proofing).

If you want to save money:

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help With Upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Depending on what you have already, if you're carrying DDR3 RAM, you'll need to pick up DDR4 with the Z390 platform.

PSU: Corsair CX750, Thermaltake Contac 21 CPU Cooler

PSU sits comfortably with this type of upgrade

the cooler is decent at best for stock performance. If hoping to manually squeeze-up ahead (overclocking) a beefier £45/£55 unit would suffice.

The Motherboard I'm planning on getting: Asus Z390-P

Are you flexible here? there are better boards available ensuring a more robust power delivery plan and a beefier VRM cooling solution. The P variant of the Z390 is one of the most cut-down barebone options in terms of features or I/Os, poorer audio audio quality and uses some cheap quality heatsinks. IMO, the 9700K deserves better to comfortably hit up on it's boost clock potential.

For $25 more, the following 2 boards are stella!

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/QDVD4D/msi-mpg-z390-gaming-plus-atx-lga1151-motherboard-mpg-z390-gaming-plus

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZwJtt6/asrock-z390-extreme4-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-extreme4

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I use an existing SSD with Windows 10 on a new B450 motherboard?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Yes the SSD is transferable but a fresh windows installation is advised to avoid driver conflicts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds good. I was just having a look at the MC website......The ASUS B450-F is listed for $130 and 2600 for $109, if purchased together = $20 off.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

RAM is perfect! For 3rd Gen anything within the 2800-3200Mhz range (or higher) keeps the CPU in check! He should be able to push those frequencies higher and throw in some tighter timing controls to squeeze out a little more perf (although not necessary).

For the motherboard, the B450-F does the job. Although personally I'd prefer a newer B450 revised model with a larger BIOS chip. This opens up doors for a more streamlined upgrade path for 3rd GEN Ryzen (or the soon incoming 4000-series). These boards also equip a more robust power delivery plan and a beefier VRM/mosfet cooling solution. a list of these boards can be located here (bottom of the page): https://www.msi.com/blog/msis-max-motherboard-lineup Preferably the Tomahawk MAX ($115) or Gaming Plus ($100). B450-F would also be great if achievable for less but current retail prices puts the board at $130

You could potentially save some cash with a lesser expensive board and pick up a brand new Ryzen 2600X (with the warranty intact). Faster single threaded processor + bundles in a performance savvy cooler. Micro center has the 2600X tagged at $120 (collection basis) and some additional deals open for bundled arrangements including the mobo and CPU for another $10-$30 trimming. Maybe worth checking out if there's a Micro nearby?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep, the LPX and Ballistix Elite are top dogs with G. Skills trident/patriot viper/ripjaws equally deserving the limelight. There's a bunch of others which measure up equally but higher binning practices seen on the LPX/BE does show some paper-weight performance gains. How this exactly occurs is unknown (to me, anyway) but the general consensus is pointing towards varied "hardware manufacturing processes". The difference in performance is minimal and for a huge number of use-case scenarios the real-world noticeable gain is non-existent. With today's memory optimisations, especially on the controller end, even the more affordable stuff measures up at an equal footing hence no performance lost. Where enthusiasts may appreciate better binned solutions (which at times occurs randomly) is pushing OC opportunities to the max with higher frequencies and tighter timing controls.

About a year or 2 ago, some of these kits were super expensive. Hence going for lower ranked renowned modules with overclocking in mind was a nice treat to offset some of that cost. Today RAM prices are the lowest we've seen and faster 3200Mhz/3600Mhz kits are now achievable for almost 150% less @ $55-$75. Hence the B-die, higher binned procurement and higher scaled voltage overrides is no longer a pre-requisite for scalable RAM when you can just purchase the desired spec from the get-go. For intel 3200Mhz 16CL is already a blast hence you don't need to worry about alternative options. Granted the LPX still has some advantage and if achievable within the budget i have to admit i'd fancy them (rumour has it: I'm also a sucker for G. Skill aesthetics hence don't mind losing negligible performance gains).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Both are excellent options

The 2600 scales marginally higher with single threaded performance which is reflective in design elements/manipulations and gaming. Comes with a stock cooler too (assuming this will be included). 2000 series CPUs (2600) also see better optimisations with memory and lesser pertinence to the more expensive B-die modules where the 1700X thrives.

On the other front, the 1700X drops in 2 additional cores offering greater breathing room for system consistency in the long run. Essentially a more powerful chip and will stand taller with the test of time. No bundled cooler may force an aftermarket solution.

Personally i'd bag the 1700X at the loss of negligible game performance returns. A couple of fps lost in games doesn't account to anything in real-world perceptible performance.....where as 8 physical cores of compute headroom is as real-world as it gets with tangible returns. Saying that, if the 2600 adds value with the inclusion of a cooler, we can't fault that one bit as it's simply just as practical.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My SSD isn't very fast for some reason"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep if you're getting 5mbps from a 5-20 allowance, that's definitely a bandwidth limitation. Maybe check with your local ISP for an upgraded package as you'd be surprised more is always possible without having to pay more on top, or for a small asking price (seasonal deals, better competitive rates, etc)

There's a bunch of download test clients available to see how well your local setup is working. Something like https://www.speedtest.net/ Just smash the "go" button and let it do it's thing (takes around a minute). You should receive 2 readings, for both download and upload speeds.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

mobo - I was leaning towards the gaming edge AC (wifi, type-c, stuff I dont necessarily need but nice to have for the future). I'll have to check into this one.

Simply put, great motherboard. For the 9700K the 200W cap power pool is more than sufficient for some tough overclocking endeavours.

memory - yeah 2x8 is undoubtedly fine but when I saw OLOy had 2x16's at $99 I fell into looking at 32 gig kits.

That is great value! Paying a little more at this point is purely down to user preference. In my personal opinion, if you're not set on saturating 16GB, 32GB just becomes excess baggage. If workload growth possibilities are likely to raise the bar @32GB in the long run, this becomes a sensible investment.

video card - (looks like)[https://gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvidia-RTX-2060S-Super-vs-Nvidia-RTX-2070S-Super/4049vs4048] 2070s is being used more then its little brother 2060s. Probably the better future proof option. Just a bit pricier. The GPU ratings their suggest the 2060s is a better value buy, heck the 1660s appears to be the best buy ATM but in terms of avg. bench the 2060s eclipses 100% so figured that was all that would be needed. the 10% increment on the 2070s comes at a $100 price bump. worth? idk ha.

For 1080p higher refresh rate gaming, the RTX 2060 SUPER is perfect. You'd only want to consider the 2070 super if targeting 1440p with a 100fps+ target (or pure game performance enthusiasm at 1080p 144fps). You're absolutely right, gaming cards scale terribly with performance when taking cost into account. In other words, already expensive cards seeing even hikier premiums for loosely driven performance gains - sucks! My usual opinion is "buy what best compliments your performance targets and spend less.....and look for gaps in the market for good re-sale value for an earlier upgrade path (a few years)". The 2060 super perfectly aligns with that notion!

case - yeah nzxt has cleeeean cases. thank you for explaining the difference! I was looking at the nzxt kraken AIO coolers and lots of reviews mentioned terrible CAM software. I don't know what CAM stands for but good to know this! I've been looking at Fractal Design as well specifically the Meshify C. Related to me that it has great temps due to the mesh front. And helps it looks quite clean as well.

CAM is basically NZXT's implementation of a "software" controller. Basically once you've got your corresponding hardware installed (AIO, RGB fans, etc) you can download CAM from the NZXT's support page. The app offerings the following:

  • a very nice user-friendly monitoring tool which is helpful to view temps, CPU/GPU loads (etc), storage utilisation, fan speeds, etc etc

  • RGB controller (essentially software based controls to manage your hardware RGB elements). Excellent SYNC controls to unify RGB configuration across matching hardware parts.

  • enables FPS counters and other in-game overlays

  • Pump (AIO) and Fan configurations (setting speeds)

  • Overclocking (I wouldn't touch this side of things even if my life depended on it - safest OCing method is always at the root level via BIOS/UEFI tweak configurations).

  • and a couple of other features which I can't recall (or i don't bother making use of)

Good luck mate :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Perfect! Solid selection of parts :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My SSD isn't very fast for some reason"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Sounds more like a patch client/network download limitation or the WIFI playing up.

Download and run something like Crystal Disk Mark (SSD/Storage benchmarking). https://crystalmark.info/en/software/crystaldiskmark/ Compare the results with the SSDs ranked speeds to see if things are running in their optimal state.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

oh crap I forgot "CAD" hehe

A quick revision....it's a bout between 3 available options (according to PCPP): https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/products/monitor/#r=344001440&P=2&A=1&sort=price&page=1&D=120000,240000&X=271,699999

I always recommend viewing user feedback from mainstream sales channels and independent reviews. In this regard, the LG panel holds truer to the greater asking price but fails to impress per user feedback. Which leaves the Dell and Acer in the final - it's gotto be a knock-out per preference....but once again being both are excellent panels, let the feedback audience add some perspective :)

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