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Forum Topic "Spending 2 Grand on first PC, but I AM CLUELESS. Please help."

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 16 days ago

If you're shifting to a standard ATX sized H500, you'll want to pick up a standard ATX motherboard. https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/3rNv6h/asrock-b365-pro4-atx-lga1151-motherboard-b365-pro4

Either combination is compatible, only a Micro-ATX smaller board in a larger case does rob the "pretty aesthetics" we have all fallen victim to. The above board is only $25 more + a few additional features, although nothing critical for a gaming rig.

Forum Topic "Spending 2 Grand on first PC, but I AM CLUELESS. Please help."

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 16 days ago

I thought the windows that I chose had a license.

The Full license only means it's fully transferable (basically a license you get to keep and transfer to newer machines later down the line). OEMs are limited to one machine hence non-transferable - so the original selection was workable.

How future proof is that graphics card? will I able to play modern games in high quality settings with at least 80 fps? or is that asking for too much?

Very future proof! Assuming you're playing on 1080p resolutions, in it's current state, the 2070 is capable of handling any demanding game on top settings (ultra in-game presets) without dropping below 80fps (averaging around 90-120fps depending on type of game). As always, you don't necessarily need to raise the bar in graphics quality at it's absolute max as some of those video settings are noticeably negligible hence plenty of fine-tuned performance available to hit above 120fps. Not all games scale equally, some are poorly optimised and disinclined to follow suit with top-end hardware. Other weighty games may also employ higher scaled multi-player couplings and huge rendered sequences in large maps at a distance which does have an impact on fps performance hence if you're dropping below 80fps occasionally in such dense environments, its expected!

Forum Topic "Spending 2 Grand on first PC, but I AM CLUELESS. Please help."

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 16 days ago

Newer generation and faster locked CPU (assuming it's a gaming build - if other requirements are in force please share your purpose of use as AMD's Ryzen CPU's offer additional processing power for tasks associated with renderin/encoding/streaming/etc)

Faster RAM (upholding the red theme)

Faster SSD in M.2 form factor. Doesn't require sata/power cables and just slots onto the mobo with a single screw.

A newer and better performing graphics card from the same manufacturer

Again upholding the case theme, $150 bucks red/black case. The S340 elite is old. For $30 bucks less you might want to look at the mid-ATX compact H500 case from NZXT which would also be a better fit for a ATX-board (the one selected below is a Micro-ATX)

Full Windows license added

Pending: Case fans

If you're planning on gaming on 1440p, I'm sure we can work on an alternative build to accommodate a superior RTX 2080 gaming card. One of the compromises being, a cheaper non-theme adhering case.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $259.00 @ Mwave Australia
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler $39.00 @ PCCaseGear
Motherboard ASRock - B365M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $125.40 @ Newegg Australia
Memory ADATA - XPG GAMMIX D10 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $141.84 @ Amazon Australia
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $103.42 @ Amazon Australia
Storage Toshiba - P300 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $69.00 @ BudgetPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Video Card $759.00 @ Shopping Express
Case NZXT - H400 (Black/Red) MicroATX Mini Tower Case $159.00 @ PLE Computers
Power Supply Corsair - RMx 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $129.00 @ PC Byte
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit $157.00 @ Shopping Express
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1941.66
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-07 02:04 AEDT+1100

p.s., for 1080p gaming, the RTX 2070 doesn't add any significant performance advantages over the RTX 2060 when accounting for the cost difference. In other words, you're paying $150-$200 more for 10-15fps more in games. Some may disagree, but i'd fancy allocating $150 on a faster core performing unlocked i5-9600K and stick with an RTX 2060. Overclocking the i5, almost matches the performance advantage offered by a RTX 2070. If 1440p is your gaming target - the faster the GPU the better!

Forum Topic "Replacing 8 yr old PC AUD"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 17 days ago

I was going to call this a "Napoleonic ASUS build" - but there amongst the ASUS beasts, like a clandestine assassin emerges EVGAAAAA!!

Not too sure on the monitor. Looking at either a 35 or 49 inch monitor.

49" is a pixel-wash-out and more of a respectable range for long distant viewing (6 feet+ TV distance). 35" calls for a sharper resolution sweet-spot (~3 feet'ish desktop distance). Have you considered an IPS display with GSYNC? Eg. https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/JvWfrH/asus-rog-strix-xg35vq-350-3440x1440-100hz-monitor-xg35vq

CPU was thinking perhaps i7 8700k.

If it's gaming and general productivity, the i7-8700K or i7-9700K are more than sufficient as top performing gaming CPUs. The listed 9900K is unnecessary, won't make much of a difference even if it boasts marginally faster single core speeds/double the threads/etc. With higher resolution gaming, the onus shifts more towards GPU performance and you've already got an absolute whale of a gaming card.

Besides the above, consider a 'full' Windows license (a license you get to keep). OEMs are non-transferable and bind into the mobo they're installed on. eg. https://au.pcpartpicker.com/product/wskwrH/microsoft-os-kw900016

Just a side note:

8 years is a long time!! If you're keeping up with the latest demanding games at ultra settings and prefer something that will keep you consistently above 60fps within the 8 year plan, you might prefer the 2560x1440p 144hz gaming resolution. The standard 1440p RES presents 25-30% lesser GPU demand hence not only will you be able to play games at a higher refresh rate (110-140fps - lesser demand utilised) but will also able to maintain higher presets in games for a longer period of time without compromising fps performance below 60fps.

None of that means anything if you are hands-on with an earlier GPU upgrade (when the time calls for it). Either way, i tend to regularly upgrade individual parts for my gaming rig (2-3 years) and if I had your budget securing a 2080 TI today, i'd be all in for the 3440x1440p 100hz curved monstrosity.

Forum Topic "3000 SERIES AMD VS 2000 SERIES AMD"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 17 days ago

Nothing out of the ordinary but where it counts, an increase in performance and hopefully a sizeable one (i'd be super pleased with a 20% advantage in raw 7nm proceeds) as long as AMD maintains the "best value to performance ratio".

I'm more looking forward to Ryzens official "pricing plan" as AMD is value-king and the Ryzen platter has proven solid with current consumer game/general compute demands. I wouldn't expect anything drastically startling in sabotaging intels single-threaded compute dominance but with Ryzen catching up and closing in on the gap for LE$$, intels lead in core-2-core supremacy becomes negligible.

Forum Topic "Been a while so need some advice..."

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 17 days ago

Hi Rob,

Only 20 quid more - take the 2600X which comes with a higher base/turbo boost clock + a more potent stock cooler (wraith spire). This combination eliminates the need for an aftermarket air cooler or AIO. Unlike the 2600, the 2600X's stock cooler is more than adequate for the CPU's performance and shifting up from here for an aftermarket solution is more of a preference based on noise levels / aesthetics (something you can look into later if suited).

For the power supply, you want something current with respectably newer components/capacitors, a credible set of protection features which measure up nicely under reviewed stress-conditions and a higher rated power-efficient ranking. Adding some preferences, a fully/semi modular unit for easier cable management and quieter fan operations.

550W is more than sufficient for your build + semi modular @ £64.99: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/dDH48d/corsair-txm-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020133-na

or, a 650W fully modular unit @ £75 - not necessary but could come handy for future upgrades or if interested in overclocking https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/PVzZxr/corsair-txm-gold-650w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020132-na

£1000 build budget may just be able to squeeze in the RTX 2060. Only consider this option if you're targeting a higher refresh rate (144hz) display and fancy closing in on 120-144fps without compromising too much on graphics quality

Forum Topic "Not sure/Can't decide between Red Team or Blue Team!!"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 18 days ago

For gaming and streaming simultaneously, both the 2700X and 9900K are excellent choices.

2700X - presenting best value, plenty of performance in the tank and comes with a very decent stock cooler @ $300

9900K - a little more on the expensive side, with 20% performance increase on both single threaded core frequencies + multi-threaded overall core compute power. Costing $200 more + an adequate $35-$50 cooler required = coming to a grand total @ $535/$550

For gaming on 1080p, both chips are capable of pushing 120fps but with intels faster cores the 9900K is capable of advancing beyond. At higher resolutions (1440p/4K) both chips are at par in terms of FPS performance.

Now it boils down to your budget comfort zone and performance targets. Personally i'm team AMD on this one as I'm more than content on hitting 90-100fps in my favourite games and the 2700X surpasses my performance targets. The value presented by AMD also makes for a very attractive selling point with next GEN AMD chips supported with current AM4 sockets (future-proofing). I can't justify a $250 20% performance overhead for 1080p streaming either when the 2700X suffices.

Although I admit, if I had cash to blow willy nillyingly, without stepping outside of my 'preferred' budget or EXP-COMFORT-ZONE, i'd grab the i9.

Forum Topic "Back Again"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 18 days ago

Depends on what you are trying to achieve!

If its gaming stick with a single higher end GPU as dual GPU support for gaming is feeble. The overpriced 2080 TI is a huge overkill for a 1080p gaming, whereas 1440p/4K makes for the better fit.

It would help to see where you are with your purpose of use / performance targets.

On dual-channel controller mobos, you want 32GB RAM split to 2x16GB for maximised bandwidth benefits. Unless having 4 sticks is necessary for your aesthetics quest and you don't mind some capped performance.

Forum Topic "My new PC won't POST"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 18 days ago

At the same time, make sure your CPU cooler fan cable is connected to the CPU_FAN1 header (on the mobo).

Forum Topic "My new PC won't POST"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 18 days ago

Check here to verify: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPELIdVNZUI

Your connector markings will be the same and the pin positioning is identical.

Mnpctech's Completed Build: Metro Exodus Gaming PC

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 18 days ago

Mnpctech, you are the very definition of "originality" - I know i've been sold on a build when I'm having to spend more than a couple of seconds viewing build images. This one had me reverting back several times just to capture the magnificence of raw talent and flawless execution. The bar has been set very high here and the build deserves a "Royal" feature - not sure how that would be implemented, but might need to give Putin a call to give PCPP a little push for a red carpet and crowned finishing.

.....and it bloody VAPES too!

Before you thank us, "thank you"!!

Forum Topic "My new PC won't POST"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 18 days ago

That sucks! I was hoping the CPU power feed was the fix

"Red light blinking" - where are you seeing this? The board should have 4 leds (EZ Debug), labelled as CPU, VGA, RAM and BOOT (or similar arrangement). These are normally located on the right side of the board, above the motherboards 24-pin ATX header.

If you are 100% certain that the front panel connectors are correctly connected, a couple of other quick troubleshooters:

  • remove all externally connected devices/peripherals (keyboard, mouse, speakers, mic, etc etc). We want to isolate the rig as much as possible to rule out any externally engaged possibilities. Give the system a shot!

  • Check to see if your CPU coolers fan is connected to the motherboards CPU_FAN1 header. You might want to check the pins and then reconnect.

  • Pull out the RAM sticks and check the dimm slots/RAM pins. Make sure these contacts are clear of any hindrance. It would be a good idea to test the system with a single RAM stick each time to eliminate the possibility of a dead-module. Make sure you're utilising the recommended dimm slots when inserting the sticks back in (according to mobo manual) and these should snap in with the latches on either side snapping into the "hold" position.

At this point if all else fails -

  1. Remove the cooler and pull out the chip. Check the CPU's condition (make sure the contacts are clear of any hindrance) and check the motherboards pins (look out for bent/broken ones). if all is good, reseat the chip, add some paste and bolt on the cooler. Remember to connect the cooler fan to CPU_FAN1 and see if it boots.

  2. If the above fails, the possibility of a bad mobo or PSU failure is likely. If you have another system in the home which you can test the PSU with, that would help.

Forum Topic "My new PC won't POST"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 19 days ago

The mobo CPU_PWR1 header (8-pin) is necessary and the additional CPU_PWR2 (4-pin) is optional for extreme overclocking (since your PSU doesn't include an extra 4-pin CPU/EPS cable, don't worry about CPU_PWR2)

On the PSU side, the included two 4-pin CPU connectors tie in as a single 8-pin connection. Line up both of these 4-pin connectors and slot them into CPU_PWR1.

Forum Topic "Dedicated streaming PC!"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 19 days ago

absolutely!

Although consider opting for a 500GB SSD. Doesn't cost much on top for doubling up and you'd be surprised how quickly 240GB gets utilised over time.

Forum Topic "Dedicated streaming PC!"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 19 days ago

ah!

That punches holes in my previous post below. Ignore it - with a GPU already in hand - the Ryzen 1600 makes for an absolute treat for both best value and multi-core/multi-threaded persuasion

At $129 it's a steal!

Forum Topic "Dedicated streaming PC!"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 19 days ago

For 900p 60fps dedicated streams, a 4 core CPU with integrated graphics is more than sufficient (absent of a discrete GPU). Plenty of processing power to hit up on 1080p 60fps streams too with basic/casual rendered quality presets (or bitrates). The candidates: Ryzen 2200G / i3-8100

If you want something with a little more flexibility, a faster single-threaded clock frequency 6-core locked intel chip with integrated video offers plenty of performance uplift for the long run. Very capable of supporting higher resolution demands or premium quality streams. Again a discrete GPU is unnecessary. Ryzen 5 offerings are great with added multi-threaded support but certainly not the best value to performance endeavour considering a discrete card is necessary. You can achieve the same performance from a faster clocked and lower latency i5 for less. Something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $169.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler $29.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B365M Phantom Gaming 4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $79.99 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Vulcan 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $50.98 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $65.89 @ OutletPC
Case Thermaltake - Versa H18 Tempered Glass MicroATX Mini Tower Case $49.99 @ Newegg Business
Power Supply Corsair - CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $50.00 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.49 @ SuperBiiz
Other Elgato Game Capture HD60 Pro, stream and record in 1080p60, superior low latency technology, H.264 hardware encoding, PCIe $164.95 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $761.06
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-03 22:05 EDT-0400

EDIT: adding 500GB SSD too - its only 15 bucks more with a ton of headroom for your OS, applications and other forthcoming possibilities.

Forum Topic "My new PC won't POST"

LIVE_AMMO 3 points 19 days ago

NICE BUILD!

If not powering up at all with no leds or fans running?

  • Make sure the PSU power switch is on the "on" position (i tend to make that error occasionally on first boot up attempts)

  • If using an extension lead, drop it and plug directly into the wall mains (to isolate potential external culprits)

  • If the above simpler checks fail, double check all cable connections from and to the PSU unit. Make sure these are snug. Make sure you have both the motherboard 24-pin ATX and 8-pin CPU connections confirmed as these are your mobo/CPU power juicers.

If you're getting power with some signs of functionality (mobo lighting up, fans running) but can't boot the system with the front panel power button - double check your front panel connections on the mobo and make sure these are plugged onto the correct pins (refer to mobo manual).

Forum Topic "Any advice??"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 20 days ago

The 2600X secures 20%-50% more performance over the 2400G. Also comes with a very decent stock cooler hence an aftermarket cooler is not necessary. The asking price for this upgrade (as your third option suggests), in my opinion is a necessary amendment for more compute performance. What you essentially get is improved system stability whilst gaming, improved gaming performance with titles capable of utilising 6 cores/multi-threaded support + more versatility and prolonged system efficiency. (only $50 more)

The GPU's performance is conditional per user-preference. A $150 gaming card is more than capable of offering decent 60fps gaming on 1080p displays (some in-game fine-tuning may be necessary for a handful of more demanding titles). But a simple fact remains, we want something that is faster, capable of playing games at their absolute best settings (ultra/high) without compromising performance ( whilst maintaining 60fps in the least). That's where a $250 gaming card adds some assurances, secures excellent visual quality going forward + future proofing in general. Then we have a third tier or group, carrying displays capable of producing higher refresh rates of 144hz (144 frames per second) where the $350-$500 category opens up. This area is more enthusiast-level with a dire need for smoother visual performance, maintaining excellent visual quality and plenty of headroom for long-term future proofing. These are not rules of the thumb and nothing is set in stone, but just a quick feel as to why a superior gaming card can lead to a decent investment should user-preference or FPS requirements make a case for it. If your panel is locked on 60hz, I wouldn't bother on a higher-end gaming card as the $150-$250 price range for you will be stella!

Here's a system absolutely capable of securing excellent performance at 1080p without some of the compromises listed above at the lower-end:

  • upgraded to 16GB RAM for overall system proficiency whilst gaming

  • 1TB SSD added - compared to traditional HD's, these will boot up windows in a matter of seconds with speedier overall system efficiency + faster game loads. HD's are great for secondary storage. Depending on your storage requirements, you could opt for a 240GB/500GB SSD for the boot drive + a 1TB secondary HD storage solution for everything else. I would stick with the 1TB SSD and upgrade to a HD later (if needed)

  • Motherboard comes with an integrated wifi adapter + antennas (an aftermarket wifi card is not needed)

  • Full version of Windows added (a license you get to keep). OEM variants are non-transferable

  • some decent 140mm PWM case fans to shift more air volumes for cooler conditions

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $199.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - X470 Master SLI/AC ATX AM4 Motherboard $124.99 @ Newegg Business
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $94.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Samsung - 860 QVO 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $107.99 @ B&H
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $279.99 @ Amazon
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $75.99 @ B&H
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ SuperBiiz
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1101.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-02 21:43 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "Any advice??"

LIVE_AMMO 3 points 20 days ago

What type of work?

The 6 core 2600X is a great option for gaming as 6-core game utilisation (as well as threaded support) is becoming a common trend with demanding titles.

Both the RTX 2060/2070 are excellent gaming cards @ 1080p. It's down to preference as the 2070 only scrapes around 10-15fps over the 2060 for a slightly steeper price range.

Alternatively, if your display is locked at 60hz, the GTX 1660/1660 TI would be the better suit.

The only thing missing is an SSD - absolutely necessary for a modern day system. Or do you have one already?

To draw up an alternative spec, the following will help:

  1. Budget? what are you comfortable with and how much can you spend on top, if necessary?

  2. Display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 60hz)

  3. Besides gaming, type of workflow?

Forum Topic "Entry-level build check"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 20 days ago

Assuming it's a pre-built with Windows included, it's good enough for a modern day 1080p gaming build.

It entirely depends on your local prices and whether there is flexibility to accommodate 16GB RAM and possibly a RX 580 GPU (preferably).

Forum Topic "First time building."

LIVE_AMMO 3 points 22 days ago

Looks great!

Maybe an M.2 SSD to eliminate excess cables? Faster, cheaper, great performance: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

Full version of Windows? OEM is non-transferable https://pcpartpicker.com/product/wskwrH/microsoft-os-kw900016

Unless you're sold on the Kraken RGB aesthetics, this one uses premium fans + way lower noise levels: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/W6RzK8/corsair-h115i-pro-554-cfm-liquid-cpu-cooler-cw-9060032-ww

Side note: RAM 3000Mhz/3200Mhz = zero noticeable difference. Save $20 https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qjM323/gskill-trident-z-rgb-16gb-2-x-8gb-ddr3-3000-memory-f4-3000c16d-16gtzr

Forum Topic "$1100 gaming and schoolwork build for a friend"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 22 days ago

Faster core clock rate 2600X + RTX 2060 gaming card

A newer quality-driven PSU

Fast 1TB SSD (if more storage is required with immediate effect, switch over to a 500GB SSD and 2TB HD)

A more airflow-driven case. You might want to look at the H500 from NZXT if design aesthetics are pointing more towards the compact-minimalist-feel (surprisingly decent airflow)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $184.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus - ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard $138.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $115.98 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg Business
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING AMP Video Card $367.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply BitFenix - Whisper M 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.00 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1084.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 12:02 EDT-0400

How much is your friend willing to secure for the display?

Forum Topic "My First Build! I need opinions!"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 22 days ago

You're not going to get much performance from an OC'd Ryzen chip above the turbo boost clock to justify a $100 AIO cooler. If it's a preference for swagged up aesthetics appeal go for it

More importantly, for gaming and streaming, I would aim to secure an 8 core CPU with the likes of the Ryzen 2700X (there are cheaper solutions with some trimmed core frequency and marginally higher multi-core latency going with the Ryzen 1700/1700X). The 2700X comes with a pretty decent stock cooler for both stock/boost adequacy hence a third-party/aftermarket cooler is not necessary.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $289.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - X470 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard $134.99 @ Amazon
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $84.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Black Video Card $489.99 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1292.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 11:16 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "1000 Euro build (mostly for AAA gaming and some school work)"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 23 days ago

If you're going for a black and white theme, how about this card in white: https://de.pcpartpicker.com/product/vFQG3C/gigabyte-geforce-rtx-2060-6-gb-gaming-oc-pro-white-video-card-gv-n2060gamingoc-pro-white-6gd

either way, the build looks great!

For some small reduction in cables under those tightly spotted PSU shrouds, you could opt for an M.2 SSD. If you don't mind spending a little more (7 EUROS), the faster MX500: https://de.pcpartpicker.com/product/fgZFf7/crucial-mx500-500gb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ct500mx500ssd4 OR stick with the WD blue m.2 which also comes in at 63 euros : https://de.pcpartpicker.com/product/6j448d/western-digital-blue-500gb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-wds500g2b0b

Forum Topic "Can someone explain this capability note please?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 23 days ago

M.2 utilisation simply borrows the lanes from the SATA port/s. Hence if you take a M.2 SSD, and plug it into one of the M.2 headers on the mobo, one of the SATA ports will be disabled. This is normal!

You don't need to do anything other than check the motherboards manual which will point out the disabled one and simply avoid it when installing additional SATA devices. You have 5 additional SATA ports available with the selected motherboard.

Forum Topic "1st Build - Gaming PC"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 23 days ago

Plenty of P600S GPU clearance for the selected 2080 TI card

If you're focusing on gaming alone and not live streaming game-content, consider the following:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor £236.99 @ Aria PC
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler £34.99 @ AWD-IT
Motherboard MSI - MPG Z390 GAMING EDGE AC ATX LGA1151 Motherboard £139.98 @ Box Limited
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory £109.98 @ Aria PC
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £108.83 @ CCL Computers
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £70.88 @ Amazon UK
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB GAMING X TRIO Video Card Purchased For £1199.99
Case Phanteks - ECLIPSE P600S ATX Mid Tower Case £129.49 @ More Computers
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA P2 850 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply Purchased For £125.47
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £83.99 @ Amazon UK
Monitor AOC - 2436V 24.0" 1920x1080 Monitor Purchased For £70.00
Monitor Acer - XB281HK bmiprz 28.0" 3840x2160 60 Hz Monitor Purchased For £550.00
Mouse Logitech - G703 (Black) Wireless Optical Mouse Purchased For £99.99
Other Logitech G PowerPlay Wireless Charging System Purchased For £109.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £3070.57
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-30 20:08 GMT+0000

or for a little extra, take a full version of Windows:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor £236.99 @ Aria PC
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler £34.99 @ AWD-IT
Motherboard MSI - MPG Z390 GAMING EDGE AC ATX LGA1151 Motherboard £139.98 @ Box Limited
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory £109.98 @ Aria PC
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £108.83 @ CCL Computers
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £70.88 @ Amazon UK
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB GAMING X TRIO Video Card Purchased For £1199.99
Case Phanteks - ECLIPSE P600S ATX Mid Tower Case £129.49 @ More Computers
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA P2 850 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply Purchased For £125.47
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit £107.36 @ More Computers
Monitor AOC - 2436V 24.0" 1920x1080 Monitor Purchased For £70.00
Monitor Acer - XB281HK bmiprz 28.0" 3840x2160 60 Hz Monitor Purchased For £550.00
Mouse Logitech - G703 (Black) Wireless Optical Mouse Purchased For £99.99
Other Logitech G PowerPlay Wireless Charging System Purchased For £109.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £3093.94
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-30 20:09 GMT+0000

If overclocking is of interest the H7 cooler does allow for some decent moderate headroom and there are more premium options available if you fancy hitting the 5.0Ghz mark.

Forum Topic "made 2 builds one amd, one intel"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 23 days ago

Your CPU choice is better determined by purpose of use.

For gaming: i5-9600K/2600X (favouring the i5)

Core count savvy workloads (streaming, video render, etc): 2700X does the job

Forum Topic "1st Build - Gaming PC"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 23 days ago

With the i9/2700X selection process, are you targeting this level of compute performance for anything other than gaming? (streaming/rendering/editing/etc)

If not, i'd look to secure a higher clocked single-threaded i5-9600K (or the HT-enabled i7-8600K/ST 8-core 9700K if the budget has flex). With 4K gaming, as time goes on (with newer demanding titles always demanding a little more), you'll want something a little more scalable with in-game settings to keep 60fps in check. Intel does make the better future-proofer, although, the 2600X/2700X are excellent alternatives for current higher res performance.

Also, have you considered the Phanteks newer P600S case? https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/search/?q=p600s+ATX Superior airflow

Forum Topic "20k$ Overkill Dream Setup. (Any Opinions or Changes to make?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 24 days ago

I stopped dreaming when i discovered the TAX MAN

Forum Topic "Cheap PC with re-purposed parts + some new"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 24 days ago

looks good!

Forum Topic "What do you guys think(new to this first PC Build, will build this summer.)"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 26 days ago

In your expert opinion, running the Ryzen 2600 on STOCK with a board with "ZERO" heatsinks (as you feverishly highlighted), would you be kind enough to share your in-depth findings as to how the board differentiates in terms of performance or thermal inconsistencies?

No hypothetical inversions please (manual overclocking). You can keep PB/XFR on the list. I hope your findings are distinctively reliable with raw data as I can't seem to rule out either of my "ZERO" heatsink B450s performance (same board) against my fully suited chunked up B450 Auros elite.

Also kindly provide a link where I can pick up a B450 for $50 - i do like a nice deal.

P.S. A light 50/100mhz trim does not justify "its just unacceptable" - thats waveringly acceptable in the modern fold of hardware multifaceted variables

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 26 days ago

I honestly wouldn't know. Since the release of RTX series of cards, there have been several artifact complaints, lines running along the display as well as cards failing just after a few weeks of use. The positive side being, you can always expect a vast number of complaints surfacing opposed to the positive ones, hence I would give the card a shot and see how well it performs.

To my personal knowledge, MSI and Zotac cards see better overall reviews compared to ASUS and Gigabyte.

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 27 days ago

A second alternative for 1080p 144hz gaming + streaming, if you can manage $1540 (no need for overclocking)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $525.00 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Thermalright - Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - Z390 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $154.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair - Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $119.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING AMP Video Card $367.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $75.99 @ B&H
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan Phanteks - PH-F140SP_BK_WLED 82.1 CFM 140mm Fan $14.39 @ Newegg
Case Fan Phanteks - PH-F140SP_BK_WLED 82.1 CFM 140mm Fan $14.39 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1542.41
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-26 23:48 EDT-0400

Where you lose 10-15fps in games with a 2060, you make up around 10fps taking the i9-9900K. The 5fps difference is negligible considering its practically non-existent by visual measure and you have a far more superior CPU going forward.

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 27 days ago

This one is more than sufficient and well-equipped to handle the 2700X: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4D7v6h/msi-x470-gaming-plus-atx-am4-motherboard-x470-gaming-plus

For a more premium offering or if you fancy some OC, any of these ladies under the $200 mark will do you justice: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#c=132&sort=price&X=15307,20260&f=2

If you want integrated wifi, either opt for the Asrock Taichi / Gigabyte Gaming 5


BTW - if you're running the chip at stock (not overclocking), the 2700X comes with a very decent boxed air cooler and is capable of pushing on the manufacturers listed turbo clockspeed (its an RGB cooler too).

I should also mention, the 2070 on 1080p panels offers only a 10-15% advantage over the 2060 (in FPS performance) with an asking price of around $150-$180 more. Just a heads-up as the 2060 is extremely capable of shifting past 60fps with averages pf 80-110fps in demanding games.

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 27 days ago

The MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK doesn't cut it with an i9-9900K processor especially with the safe temperatures features that this board offers. It throttles the i9-9900K down.

At stock and turbo clock frequencies, in real-time game and streaming workloads, the Tomahawk very easily handles the i9. Most likely demands a CPU power package of 120-140w in real-time user operable conditions. Plastering synthetic tests running AVX instruction sets/P-95 at full load (100% threaded 8-core compute utilisation) is extremely unrealistic and only worthy of note for overclocking purposes. Since we already agree the board does present limitations with i9 Ocing and the OP isn't considering the i9 and is citing an i7-8600K, the rest is irrelevant.

It may be good with an i7-9700K, it's just that the i7-9700K has 8 logical cores and the i7-8700K 12.

No limitations here! Unlike the 9900K's heftier draw with it's optimised multi-threaded parallelism and higher power demanded lower latency fabrication, the 8 core 9700K takes a lighter take on total power draw (almost directly resembling the 8600K). Both the 9700K and 8600K are overclock-able on the Tomahawk, although limitations apply for core clock rate ceilings (avg. 4.8Ghz)

The problem is, that i don't like to suggest a board with the argument of...yes it's a good board as long as you don't use an i9 processor, so just select something with less cores and a moderate OC.

I still hold that opinion (even though the i9 was not mentioned, but a 8700K). If you revert back to the initial reply above - a clear distinction was made with 3 individual "OC" focused motherboards with an option to a 4th Tomahawk which remains OC-compatible for the inquired i7 CPU. The purpose behind the alternating 2 tiers offered (a good quality board capable of OC + 3 more OC inclined premium offers) was to allow the OP to make a practical decision based on their budget

Yes the other boards does cost a bit more, but that money is well spend. :)

I totally agree, if the OP is willing

Review in question: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/mag-z390-tomahawk-core-i9-9900k-msi-atx-motherboard,5914.html

These are tremendously hostile synthetic stress tests pushing the chips power drive and logical cores to their absolute max (artificial max core utilisation). If you double check - it's an i9, not the user cited i7. Since the OP hasn't declared interest in the i9 nor "extreme overclocking", the linked review more-over represents a potential "what if". Although I completely agree, if the OP had desired an upgrade path to an i9 at a later date with overclocking in mind - the Tomahawk wouldn't have seen the light of day (in mention).

Anyway -doesn't matter, the OPs declared an additional use-case scenario with streaming in the mix and sees the 2700x as the better value and performance alternative.

Forum Topic "Noob PC builder, appreciate all opinions"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 28 days ago

I am already exceeding the original budget

  1. What was the preferred original budget?

  2. ...and with all parts selected above, what is your current total cost?

  3. You've selected all parts from newegg alone - are you open to competitive prices from other sellers or planning on sticking with newegg only?

Edit: 4. Whats your displays resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 60hz)

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 28 days ago

For the cooler recommendation, it would be nice to see where you are with your budget. Even better can you share your parts list here? It would help to determine whether the i9 holds potential. If budget stricken, I would much rather secure the i9 to run at stock with a semi-decent $50 beefier air cooler, opposed to a 2700X with a beefier and aesthetically swelled $100-$150 AIO.

Budget?

Current parts list?

....also are you keen on overclocking?

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 28 days ago

If you've purchased the 8700K already, you should be OK but with lightly configured stream presets (esp bitrate) if targeting 1080p 60fps streams. 720p streams will work a breeze with very little performance hits (noticeably anyway)!

If you haven't purchased the 8700K already, I would drop it for the more compute savvy Ryzen 2700X as it yields greater multi-core/threaded compute performance. More cores, more threads = lesser performance hits whilst gaming and streaming simultaneously.

If the budget has flex, a great alternative being intels i9-9900K paired up with an Asrock Taichi Z390 motherboard. To simply, the i9 marginally outperforms the 8700K in single threaded workloads + adding 2 additional cores (8c/16t). Depending on your budget and purpose of use, your best options are the 2700X or the superior i9-9900K which does ask for a hefty premium.

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 28 days ago

I should have been a little more clearer - "good" as in it does allow for some decently moderate overclocking. It's an entry level 150W/160ish throttler at best but a very nice suit for the 8700K and capable of achieving a stagnant 4.7/4.8Ghz OC (1.28/1.32v max - no delidding) - thats achievable with not the 'very best' cooling solution at hand but a beefy single fan thermalright silver arrow. I was meaning to push on 4.9 with my kraken X64/Cry-R1-ulti while it lasted but artificially stressed AVX instruction loads with the silver arrow @4.9 were hitting early BSODs or GTA 5's memory hog crash assaults kinda dropped the optimism in the trash can. A 4.8Ghz OC and very comfortable temp lodgings in games and general productivity opposed to P-95's unconventional surge in temps (88/89c - 30mins), gets the Tomahawk a vote-in from me. Well an entry-level OC mobo at best for the OC budget buff.

The only real drawback being, should an upgrade in the coming years spell out an 8-core i9 compatible addition, the boards 160W CPU packaged power draw acts as a primary limiter with proven CPU throttling (the stressed i9 hankers on around 180W+). A capable board but manufacturer intended tiered/confined boundaries are evident in extolling higher-tier offerings for the enthusiast variety.

Forum Topic "What are the z370 motherboards thats compatible with the rtx 2070 Armor 8G OC?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 28 days ago

Take the newer Z390 motherboard:

This one offers excellent value, features and very decent quality. Good for overclocking too: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/3yrmP6/msi-mag-z390-tomahawk-atx-lga1151-motherboard-mag-z390-tomahawk

If overclocking is a priority and you want something a little more premium (beefier or more effective VRM cooling and additional power phases), any of the following will do the job:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/N6gzK8/gigabyte-z390-aorus-pro-wifi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-aorus-pro-wifi

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/TnhKHx/asrock-z390-taichi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-taichi

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/p2GxFT/msi-mpg-z390-gaming-pro-carbon-atx-lga1151-motherboard-mpg-z390-gaming-pro-carbon


BTW - feel free to share your parts list if you require further recommendations. Is it for gaming?

Forum Topic "Ryzen 7 2700X/RTX 2060/1080p 60fps Build"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 29 days ago

I was meaning to suggest earlier - with the total cost brought down around $70, it would be a good opportunity to put some of those proceeds towards additional case fans. It's not entirely necessary considering the case already comes with 2 pre-installed fans but judging by your case choice I'm assuming you're all about "airflow" efficiency (me too).

Maybe x2 of these PWM 140mm ones: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/byjJ7P/arctic-p14-pwm-728-cfm-140mm-fan-acfan00124a

there are more premium units available but these do the job just fine at a minimal cost. I have the same case and mounted the 2 pre-installed fans on the rear and top for exhaust and purchased 2 additional 140mm ones for intake at the front. Makes for a solid air volume shift with the front mesh!

Forum Topic "Ryzen 7 2700X/RTX 2060/1080p 60fps Build"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 29 days ago

For streaming and gaming simultaneously, definitely stick with Ryzen 2700X as the i5s/i7s will trade blows.

Graphics encoding (nvenc) will affect games from maxing out with preferred visual quality presets (affecting FPS too, although limiters can be applied). CPU encoding (x264) with an 8-core multi-threaded 2700X offers plenty of processing power with lesser CPU-bound performance hits, making for the better and faster bitrate render solution.

Bottom line, if you want high-quality streams, x264 is the way to go and the 2700X delivers with little compromise.

By comparison, when analysing gaming performance, both the 2700X and i5-9600K are not that much different from a real-world observable perspective. The i5 at stock will possibly allow for an average of 5-10fps more in games, something the naked eye is oblivious to. Hence not much is lost in terms of gaming performance as your setup with a 2700X and an RTX 2060 is easily capable of playing demanding games above the 90fps mark (scalable to 120fps depending on game/settings). Where the 2700X outperforms the i5 (very noticeably) is those extraordinary 8 physical cores with 30% additional SMT performance for a fraction of the cost when compared to a similar structured alternative from intel (i9-9900K). At this point nvenc is pointless, unless OBS dedicated specifics can partially/less-collectively make use of GPU encoding practices at a minimum whilst maintaining the CPU X264 encode principle as the primary.

The 2700X back in action:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $289.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - X470 Master SLI/AC ATX AM4 Motherboard $134.99 @ Newegg Business
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $120.98 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $114.99 @ B&H
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case $94.99 @ Walmart
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ SuperBiiz
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $224.99 @ Walmart
Keyboard Corsair - K70 RGB MK.2 Wired Gaming Keyboard $99.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1509.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-24 22:20 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "Racing Sim: 49 inch monitor or VR?"

LIVE_AMMO 3 points 29 days ago

For general productivity, Web dev workloads and lesser strain on the eyes for long hour gaming - I would look to secure a large display. Depending on your budget and graphics power, preferably a 1440p ultra widescreen curved panel (3440 x 1440) = https://pcpartpicker.com/products/monitor/#D=100000,240000&sort=price&r=344001440

The above display resolution does demand a superior performing GPU - what do you have?

Forum Topic "Ryzen 7 2700X/RTX 2060/1080p 60fps Build"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 29 days ago

M.2/SATA-disabling: You've got 6 SATA ports available, 2 will disable with the M.2 SSD (this is normal) and you still have 4 available for a ton of more storage in the long run. Just check the mobo manual to see which SATA ports are disabled are avoid them when installing additional storage devices.

You can do way better than 60fps with your parts list or the below setup. With a 144hz refresh rate panel in the bag, the RTX 2060 is capable of hitting 144fps or averaging around 90-120fps in demanding games on top quality settings. Speaking of displays, swapped this out for a VA-144hz MSI panel. This ones GSYNC compatible for butter smooth frames + elimination of screen tearing/judder/etc.

If gaming is the only purpose at hand (not streaming or running other multi-core/multi-threaded workloads), consider a faster single threaded i5-9600K. The faster the cores the better the gaming performance + greater sustainability and performance increase with in-game down-scalability.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $264.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $31.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $156.00 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $120.98 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $114.99 @ B&H
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case $94.99 @ Walmart
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ SuperBiiz
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $224.99 @ Walmart
Keyboard Corsair - K70 RGB MK.2 Wired Gaming Keyboard $99.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1536.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-24 18:38 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "Noob PC builder, appreciate all opinions"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 29 days ago

Looks good!

  • You can pick up some performance-savvy 500GB SSDs for the same price

  • You're not too far off from securing a RTX 2060. Something worth looking into if pairing it up with a higher refresh rate panel panel (144hz). As for staying above 60fps, the 1660 TI is very capable at top settings on 1080p, as well as the 1660 non-TI

  • Superb quality PSU's are achievable for around the $60-$90 mark (depending on semi/full modularity)

  • CPU will require a $25-$35 cooler to get the best out of the chip at stock/boost configurations. Or something beefier for $50+ for overclocking.

Whats the max budget?

Just gaming? (not streaming, right?)

Need more storage?

Forum Topic "New Build Opinions Wanted"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 29 days ago

M.2 utilisation simply borrows the lanes from the SATA port/s. Hence if you take a M.2 SSD, and plug it into one of the M.2 headers on the mobo, one/two of the SATA ports will be disabled. This is normal!

You don't need to do anything other than check the motherboards manual which will point out the disabled one/s and simply avoid it when installing additional SATA devices. You have 4 additional SATA ports available with the selected motherboard.

Forum Topic "First Build! Streaming and future gaming"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 29 days ago

1.38v can manage a higher single core performance ceiling but faces discrepancies on all core sustainability (unless you've got a golden ticket). There are other variables not being factored in, for example, lack of XFR2 support, poorer optimal memory conformity in non-X variant Ryzen amalgamated ramped up conditions, temp spikes with pushing a 65W rated CPU to a more 'scalable' and 'accordant' 1.4v override, etc. More importantly you will need a beefier aftermarket cooler which ends up costing the same/more than the 2700X.

The point being, the 2700X maintains excellent performance on clock frequencies and stability as an overall factor, outperforming the 2700 without overclocking. There's no argument here, you can't compare these chips at this point as the cost difference is only £50 and the 2700X doesn't require an aftermarket cooler to cap-up on it's performance ceiling. It would have been a different story had these been priced 100 pounds apart (where the Ryzen 1700/1700X makes for a nice cost-effective alternative with a little down-tuned performance)

Forum Topic "New Build Opinions Wanted"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 1 month ago

and I really wanted some rgb for this build since my last one didn't have any. I'm a simple man.

Once you go RGB you lose that "simple man" privilege. I lost my non-RGB virginity in 2017 after years of eagerly poised antagonism. I haven't been the same since lol. It always starts with mild accents here and there and sooner then you can call it, you've got yourself a full blown circus show in your home.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $379.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $69.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $156.00 @ Amazon
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $104.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.85 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Black Video Card $489.99 @ Amazon
Case Thermaltake - V200 Tempered Glass RGB Edition ATX Mid Tower Case $74.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan Deepcool - RF 120 56.5 CFM 120mm Fan -
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1495.78
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-23 23:37 EDT-0400

Only $35 more for:

  • a faster clock cycling k-series CPU (excellent auto-turbo boost ceiling for a scalable 5-7% performance advantage) + overclocking potential (something you might fancy a couple of years down the line)

  • RGB RAM

  • A compatible Z390 mobo with some added optimised functionality both at the memory/CPU level + beefier VRM cooling/power phases for streamlined power draw (lesser CPU throttling).

  • MX500 SSD from Crucial doesn't require any cables and delivers the same performance and quality as Samsung's offering

EDIT: If you don't mind me asking, what are you targeting for in terms of gaming resolution? (1080p/1440p/4k)

Forum Topic "First Build! Streaming and future gaming"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 1 month ago

I wouldn't recommend overclocking any of the Ryzen 2000-series CPUs which demand too much of a voltage override for a meaningful advantage and the non X-modifiers equally beg for a more premium cooler which will cut you back $50-$80. The 2700 fares poorly with fine-tuned voltage off-sets and AMDs memory controllers are binned or pre-configured to cap out (throttle) past 4.0/4.1Ghz (which is never a positive achievement when having to dial in 1.4v+ and keeping performance degradation in mind).

For raw performance, the on-board PB2.0/XFR auto-enabling is capable of achieving a 4.1-4.3Ghz turbo ceiling with the 2700X whilst maintaining memory latency which is pertinent to Ryzens architectural fabrication and finer stability at peak cycles. With a beefier and adequate cooler included, the 2700X for 50 quid more is a steal!

If an undesired overclocking solution is the way forward - an overclocked 2700X maintains it's superiority with 10-20% excess in core frequency differentiation.

Forum Topic "First Build! Streaming and future gaming"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 1 month ago

With his budget possibilities you can't skimp on the 2700's weaker single core clock cycles (10-20% on the weaker side). The 2700X's single-thread core clock rate is significantly superior which does have a profound effect on gaming performance or more-so on in-game scalability and includes a beefier $30-$40 stock cooler.

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