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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How to add a 2nd M.2 NVME SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

It's a simple case of plug-n-play.... no BIOS config necessary.

In bios, you'll want to check whether both M.2 slots are set to x4 PCIe for optimal performance, as previous GEN boards were defaulted to Auto/x2 (these options should be available in the Advanced tab>on-board device configurations)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "RYZEN 5 2600x OR RYZEN 7 2700?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Have you considered the 2700X?.....

Essentially, only $10 more over the 2700 (if you're based in regions which reflect these prices, +UK +US), matches the single threaded performance of a 2600X (actually the 2700X is an incy wincy bit faster) and beats the 2700 with a 10-15% lead across the board. If that's not enticing enough, the 2700X drops in a beefier liquid heat chamber stock cooler + RGB (if you're a fan).

At this rate, even if it's a little more than $10, the 2700X presents excellent value for 2 additional cores over the 2600X and impressively nippier performance over the 2700.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Correct way to clone HDD to SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Great - if everything is working fine, you're good to go! How are you finding your windows boot operations? much faster? Coming away from HD to SSD is a fresh breath of air for any system :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Multiple SSDs"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Part recommendations in terms of performance/quality is one thing. The required amount of storage is another - something which can only be best determined by the user.

For some, 500GB is all they need for the operating system, applications and media. Enough for gaming too if you're downloading only a few number of titles or many lesser storage commandeering games.

If you need more than 500GB, i'd fancy a 1TB SSD as these are achievable for under $100. If you need more storage, preferably a 500GB SSD (for the boot drive/applications/etc) and a more cost effective 2TB/+ hard drive as a secondary solution.

If you're uncertain about how much storage is required, give us some idea as to what you'll be doing on the system. If you already have a system on-the-go, you can view your current storage usage by hitting the "my computer" or "this PC" icon.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which RAM should i choose?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

3000Mhz is perfectly fine

Considering 3200Mhz 16CL / 3600Mhz 17-18CL no longer charge a heftier premium on top, these are also fantastic options (depends how cost differs in your region of the world - I wouldn't pay more than $5/$10 for a little but plausible overkill)

Check the motherboards rated memory speed. For non-Z390's don't bother with anything beyond the 2666/3000Mhz mark unless achievable for the same cost or less. For some of the entry level Z390s, these will also cap out @ 2666Mhz hence don't bother spending more for faster kits.

A handful of entry level, all mid-tier and premium boards will scale higher .

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC doesnt boot up after i got a new CPU."

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

It's possible you have an older version of BIOS installed, and not a later addition which validates the 8000-series chip.

Drop the 4100 chip back into the build and update BIOS. Or first check the BIOS version against the validated update which should be listed in the board manufacturers support page.

EDIT: had a quick look - you should have BIOS v. 1201 (or above) to get the 8350 to post up

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Correct way to clone HDD to SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If that's something you fancy - its all good :) Otherwise, it's not something that is necessary for drive recreation purposes.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Ignore the warning error. The B450 "MAX" is 100% Ryzen 3000-ready and "does not" require a BIOS update. You can view the motherboards specifications from the manufacturers website to confirm this or generally run a search online. The MAX variant motherboards were only recently added to the B450 stack with improved optimisations and a larger BIOS chip for 3000-series CPUs. PCPP is yet to correct their compatibility filter as the BIOS update was necessary on previous "non-MAX" B450 models.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Correct way to clone HDD to SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

that's not a problem....

don't use the task manager "end" function which will pull the plug on the last locked data block. The defrag window should offer a "end" / "stop" option which is perfectly safe to use.

The roadblocks are possibly due to corrupt files or actively engaged data. If you prefer defragging first (not necessary), run it in Win safe-mode. Also if you're running Windows 10, defrag runs automatically - so you may already have your HD fine-tuned.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Correct way to clone HDD to SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The delicately sensitive nature of spinner hard drives demands a more secure mounting mechanism. SSDs don't carry moving parts (unlike HDs). It's safe to mount these anywhere inside the case, in a vacant spot. Either a quick DIY job or a lazier but convenient approach with thick/padded double sided tape or something that i've been using for years - VELCRO!

edit: forgot to mention, preferably mounted in an area which is least affected by the systems heat culprits (CPU/GPU/etc). The last thing you want is adhesion-fail due to long-term heat-distress. For me it's never been a problem, even the cheap velcro stuff (ebay/amazon) delivers some pretty tough adhesion.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Correct way to clone HDD to SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

This isn't necessary. Fragmented allocations carried forward on a SSD have zero impact on SSD/system performance. Flash based SSDs access data by pin-pointing cell allocations (like a camera snapshot) whereby HD data is accessed using a spinning disk platter. The platter and spinner combo are latency driven and largely dependent on disk speed (limited at 7200RPM for the consumer market) whereas SSDs eliminate such latencies with FLASH MEMORY - whereby disintegrated data can comfortably co-exist with zero performance penalties.

Oddly enough, one theory is, split data (fragmented) across a number of NAND chips implies faster overall performance. Essentially, a simultaneously versatile I/O data-bank approach with a ton of conversions made possible at any given time. Whether someone has tested this theory or not, is unknown, but now with PCI 4.0 possibilities it would be interesting to see how that pans out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Usually these founder edition blower type cards are expected to perform terribly in terms of noise levels and temps. Only this time round Nvidia employed a dual-fan arrangement which does the job nicely. It's a decent option if available for less otherwise the aftermarket solutions with the added perks deliver a more satisfying over-all experience

If you prefer a different NVIDIA partner card based on design elements/aesthetics, theres a bunch of options available from reputable companies with the likes of MSI, ASUS, GIGABYTE, ZOTAC, etc. A list of these can be found here: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#c=436&sort=price

Keep in mind $350 is already a little pricey (which is expected with mid-ranged/higher-end RTX cards). Personally I wouldn't pay much more for a 2060 card, as the 2060 "SUPER" variant grabs a 15% faster performance gain can be achieved for bang-on $400.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The Nvidia card is a founders edition unit. The aftermarket branded cards (or partner AIB cards) are refined units using the same nvidia card but with some improved cooling solutions, faster factory overclocked speeds, quieter operations, etc. In other words, the above selected MSI card is an NVIDIA card - supplemented with further optimisations.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

glad it helps... double glad the budget has wings @ $700 which allows you to push for a better balanced upgrade.

If the RTX card is of priority for ray tracing / added performance ceiling, this is also possible with a $700 budget. Keeping the faster RAM in check, this comes to $710, eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage TCSunBow X3 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $0.00
Storage Seagate BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $0.00
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $349.99 @ Newegg
Case Cougar MX330 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $0.00
Monitor Asus VG245H 24.0" 1920x1080 75 Hz Monitor $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $709.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-24 14:30 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3600 or 2700X"

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

adequately optimised to "a degree". With a barebone heatsink absent of liquid heatpipes or a wider heat dissipation facility, hitting up on 85c+ is familiar territory. The efficient 7nm process node easily bypasses power state arrangements hence power plan limitations being absent will run the chip too hot. This leads to performance degradation in the long run. On top, noise levels smashing through the roof is highly undesirable. A favourably optimised cooler is usually an affirmation of a number of key factors comprising of performance, noise levels and long-term durability - hence the the barebone HSF even with a lower TDP rated 3600 is "passable" but not adequately optimised for a chip capable of hitting 4.2Ghz whilst entertaining a volatile voltage over-ride. A lot of buyers who have achieved 4.2Ghz have overlooked one aspect....the chip boosts on the primary 1st/2nd core only. A better heat dissipating cooler unlocks greater consistency with all-core utilisation without clock cycle throttling across the board.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

What you have there is a 75hz panel which is capable hitting 75fps max. At this resolution and capped refresh rate, the display will bottleneck the 2070 SUPER quire considerably hence you'll end up with a "whole lot of GPU" and with not enough "utilisation" to justify the $500-$550 spend.

A more befitting approach:

  • GTX 1660 SUPER which easily grabs 75fps via demanding games on top settings (best fit in terms of performance and value)

  • RTX 2060 - plenty of performance headroom + ray tracing (more of the enthusiast approach)

  • RTX 2060 SUPER - if you fancy some overkill (a neat option if you're considering upgrading to a 144hz panel in the long run).


[OPTIONAL]

If that was my build here in 2019 and if I had a budget of $500-$550, I'd raise a little extra cash (saving/loan/etc) to achieve the following:

  • Ryzen 3600X CPU. 1080p gaming responds very nicely with faster single threaded cores

  • Faster RAM - preferably 16GB

  • Newer compatible motherboard to unlock all of the CPU/chipset features

  • A GTX 1660 SUPER graphics card.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor $199.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage TCSunBow X3 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $0.00
Storage Seagate BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $0.00
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $239.99 @ Best Buy
Case Cougar MX330 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $0.00
Monitor Asus VG245H 24.0" 1920x1080 75 Hz Monitor $0.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $624.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-24 12:17 EST-0500

Once achieved, sell the swapped parts and you should see a nice return on your spending spree. The 1600 CPU is still pretty solid and holds decent re-sale value - something worth taking advantage of.

Alternatively, if you're looking to land ray tracing - grab a RTX 2060 (or RTX 2060 SUPER overkill) and save up for a future upgrade with the likes of a Ryzen 4000 CPU which is expected in Mid/late-2020.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Correct way to clone HDD to SSD?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm getting an 860 evo soon

If your mobo supports one, you might be interested in a similarly priced faster M.2 NVME SSD.

1) power off pc and plug in ssd 2) turn it back on and use samsung data migration to clone my hdd to ssd 3) turn it back off, configure boot prio in bios and boot back up done?

That's about it....job DONE

During the cloning process let the system be. I tend to turn off the internet too as you don't want file s and data actively engaged with web services.

some side questions I have would be: do I have to unplug my hdd before I configure the SSD as boot priority drive in my bios? do I have to do anything on my HDD once I have everything cloned over? (such as delete windows somehow)

You don't need to do anything. Although I have a tendency to unplug the HD before booting up from the newer boot drive (for no apparent reason - old habits die hard)

if you intend on formatting the HD with immediate effect, I would look to back up the original source first. Whether formatting or not, a backup is always a good idea.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC for gaming and general use"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

570's carry a larger VRM/mosfet package and a brawnier power phase plan which is more befitting for Ryzen 3900X/3950X 12/16 core CPU options. For the 3600/3600X/3700X and surprisingly the 3900X at stock, the 450 tomahawk MAX delivers all the power you need + sufficient cooling which allows the 3700X to comfortably hit the rated boost clock. What makes the Toma MAX most appealing is the reasonable asking price and abundant features, which for most is AMPLE! .... Not all 450's, but a bunch of the premium mid-range models (Toma MAX being the best of the them). The MAX variants are later revisions with larger BIOS chips aimed at Ryzen 3rd GEN - purportedly unlocking 3rd GEN full-features and forward-optimisations. Hence the X570 leaning is no longer a requirement.

Now, if you see yourself shifting over to a "higher core count" 3000/looming-4000-series CPU as a potential upgrade, the X570 takes precedence. Other reasons to adopt the X570 path is PCIE 4.0 (greater bandwidths) and added I/O functionality.... but for a gaming and general use build I don't believe these types of workstation class perks will add favour (eg. 12 core+ chip, running multiple GPUs for rendering, a NAS like storage fest, x3+ NVME x4 pcie SSDs, 10gig Gigabit ports, etc etc). Most likely for a gaming build the 3700X is already a beast with several years secured under the belt - by the time you'll consider upgrading, you will have succeeded way past the X570's upgrade potential for more superior and newer DDR5 consumer platforms.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First build-case fan help"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Was thinking 3 intake 3 exhaust.

This achieves a nice balance

What would be most efficient cooling? What would look the best with decent cooling?

Personally I'd prefer mounting 3 intake fans at the base and 3 on top for exhaust (with a magnetic dust filter - can be purchased separately for around $10)

From an aesthetics point of view, I guess the side mount utilisation makes sense too. I'm sure either mounting position won't make much difference in thermals, although direct cooler air towards the GPU from the base seems favourable.

You can't do much with fan orientation as intake fans will pull a moony with the backside. As crazy as this might sound, there are a handful of aesthetically driven enthusiasts (one of them I know personally) who have committed to an "all-fan-intake" fest with the same case (purely for aesthetics, as his NZXT fans are single RGB sided). It works fine as the base and rear vents offer sufficient passively driven air for a large variety of build arrangements at stock performance (he's running a 8700K with I believe a GTX 1080/1080 TI with zero performance throttling and reasonably decent temps in realistic game/CPU max load workloads). Although this type of "high-tide" negative air pressure is not recommended and behaves like a dust-magnet but it is something workable if aesthetics hold precedence. Absolutely ZERO harm in trying out both orientations and see how they compare. If performance is key, the balanced intake/exhaust arrangement is unmatched.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC for gaming and general use"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Only $6/$7 more for 3600Mhz modules. 3200Mhz 16CL and 3600Mhz 18CL are practically the same speed, only Ryzen prefers higher bandwidths. 3600Mhz with manually adjusted tighter timing controls makes this kit a absolute treat: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/XWGnTW/corsair-vengeance-rgb-pro-16-gb-2-x-8-gb-ddr4-3600-memory-cmw16gx4m2d3600c18

A whopping 10-15% performance gains if you grab the RTX 2070 "SUPER". Similar price if you apply the $20 discount offered on the site, otherwise for this type of performance uplift, i'd be prepared to pay a little more (plenty of 2070 supers to choose from): https://www.newegg.com/evga-geforce-rtx-2070-super-08g-p4-3071-kr/p/N82E16814487456?Item=N82E16814487456&nm_mc=AFC-RAN-COM&cm_mmc=AFC-RAN-COM&utm_medium=affiliates&utm_source=afc-PCPartPicker&AFFID=2558510&AFFNAME=PCPartPicker&ACRID=1&ASID=https%3a%2f%2fpcpartpicker.com%2fproduct%2f88drxr%2fevga-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-black-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3071-kr&ranMID=44583&ranEAID=2558510&ranSiteID=8BacdVP0GFs-nqEGdYTPqu4Pmn1u48ftSw

Other SUPER options: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/video-card/#c=447&sort=price&page=1

Mobo is great!

The rest looks fine.... pricey peripherals but then again i'm a boring old joe with poorer taste for bland and just passable performing externals.

EDIT: almost forgot, possibly this case: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/T2RgXL/nzxt-h710-atx-mid-tower-case-ca-h710b-b1 unless you don't mind getting locked into NZXTs CAM software for RGB fan/led strips functionality (via the integrated smart hub). CAM hasn't been the most honourable of candidates for a bug-free experience but I guess only recently I've spoken to 2 newer NZXT CAM subscribers who are suggesting "problem-free" experiences with the newer software patch. I'm still a sceptic (i've had too much trouble with CAM and it's weird update/fix vehicle which at times does iron out a couple of issues here and there but then relapses with newer problems - a pain in the a$$ - but a clear winner for case design aesthetics for which I'm a BIG FAN).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU upgrading"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Just keep in mind, the 2070 super is aimed at higher resolution gaming or higher refresh rate (144hz) gaming on 1080p. For example, if you're carrying a 60hz locked panel @ 1080p, you'd be better off sticking with the GTX 1060 and upgrading the CPU to a Ryzen 3600 to secure 60fps. If limited by GPU design, for this type of display output, a GTX 1660 SUPER / TI is more than sufficient.

So what is your displays resolution and refresh rate?

Another thing to consider - if the current GPU's getting the job done at a respectable rate, you might fancy waiting a little longer (3 months or so) for NVIDIA's next GEN AMPERE GPUs. "Hopefully" better performance at more competitive cost. AMD is also set to officially announce up-n-coming 7nm process node GPUs (possibly during the Jan 2020 @ CES).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "MSI Tomahawk B450 Replacement"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The Mortar Max was the original board I wanted

Best of the bunch, if you're able to locate one.

MORTAR TITANIUM @ $190.00 The B450M GAMING PLUS was my alternate choice.

The mortar titanium is the better feature-rich board with 4 dimm slots (64GB MAX), addition GEN 2 USB ports, marginally improved audio codec, decent VRM solution, etc. The gaming plus is more affordable with 2 dimm slots (32GB MAX) and delivers plenty of functionality for most + an added perk with a beefier VRM cooling solution (something I would have expected on the over-priced titanium). The Gaming Plus @ $100 is a stella deal but i totally get it, the reds are a pain in the butt (i prefer all black too).

Both are excellent options providing these meet your requirements per spec.

I've also looked at the MSI B450 Bazooka Plus and Bazooka V2 but I'm just confused with the difference in these two boards.

If you're not planning on overclocking, these 2 models are equally fantastic

The Bazooka Plus adds a little more functionality but again the V2's features are simply more than sufficient for the vast number of people. What sets them apart is the Bazooka Plus's greater consistency with lesser thermal throttling concerns with overclocking/higher core count CPU boost clocks. Basically a newer and better performing beefier VRM heatsink with performance not far off from the MSI Gaming Plus. The V2 is an upgrade from the original MSI Bazooka which is a decent mid-ranged motherboard (not entirely sure what the difference is between the original/V2, possibly a light-weight revision or an improved perk at the feature-level - worth googling if you want to know more).

Your best options (keeping higher core count upgrade options in mind):

  • Bazooka Plus

  • Gaming Plus

  • or, if available, the Mortar Max

Keep in mind, "best" does not imply "necessary" and the 3 options provided are just better in their class of MSI mATX boards.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I upgrade my 980 Ti?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Is it worth it to go up to a 2070 super?

$650-$750 CAD is a boat load of cash....

In 3 months (ETA: March 2020), Nvidia is set to launch their next GEN AMPERE graphics cards. If you can hold on for a little longer, your cash could be put to more lucrative returns with lower TDPs, increased clock-speeds, improved frame buffering, efficiently faster raytracing cores, possibly more VRAM, etc.

If the 980 TI holds up, assuming you can comfortably engage 60fps via a mix of med/high quality in-game presets, it's definitely worth the wait. Furthermore, if the rumours come to light, AMD is expected to announce RTX competitors on a 7nm+ process node during CES 2020 (a month away) which is most likely in the "mid/high performance" range opposed to the cream of the crop which NVIDIA has a firm footing on. With a 1440p 60hz locked panel, you could potentially pick up a 2070 SUPER performance equivalent (next GEN) for far less, or even a 2060/2060-SUPER equivalent for cheaper which is more then sufficient for 60hz 1440p gaming - SAVINGS better worthy of a CPU upgrade

Speaking of CPU upgrade - higher resolution gaming is more GPU-bound hence this is a secondary upgrade possibility. Lets face it, the locked 4 core single threaded 6600 has it's days numbered - especially if you're targeting newer and more demanding titles. Already a handful of games are beginning to struggle (lag, artifacts, etc) and no doubt lesser CPU resources/clockspeed exploits will impact FPS potential (being the CPU is the FPS hard-limit) with beefier graphics rendering engines (bottleneck). In other words, a Ryzen 3600 + 2060 is likely to deliver the same performance as an i5-6600 paired up with a 2070 SUPER.

It doesn't get any easier, from 6 months from now (or longer), AMD is set to launch 4000-series Ryzen CPUs. To simplify, with the assumption the 980 TI will suffice for the time being, the desired upgrade-plan: An Ampere 3000 card (hopefully in the $400-$550 range) at the end of the 1st quarter of 2020 and then mid/end of 2020, a 4000-series CPU/mobo/faster RAM upgrade (or a more affordable 3000-series CPU build as it'll be more than adequate for 1440p gaming). Any additional premium charged above the current spend should be largely compensated with the sale of the replaced parts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "High end PC list. Opinion wanted"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry I edited my previous post with a para focused on the GPU (if it helps).

Build notes:

  • The 3950X would be a blast for 4K rendering - unfortunately out of stock and where available the asking price is rampantly extortionate (I wouldn't pay more than $800 for this chip). Hence the 3900X added. In fact i'd prefer the 3900X at this point in time and by next year (mid/late 2020) the AM4 platform (X570) will be compatible with the then released 4000-series CPUs which should see further optimisations across the board.

  • 2 sets of RAM kits are perfectly fine for these dual memory controller boards. Higher bandwidth modules added with G. Skills newer NEO Trident RGB banding (better optimised for Ryzen).

  • X570 + wifi integrated motherboard.

  • I believe the preference is AIO - hence opted for a quieter premium fan CORSAIR unit. Feel free to switch back if you were intending on swapping out the fans on the EVGA CLC (no doubt, the CLC performs marginally better)

  • Avoid those 3TB consumer-level hard drives. These are known to have a higher fail rate - in fact most 3TB basic tier units are deemed lesser-durable esp. with higher operational use-cases. Enterprise level HD's are the way to go for robust read/write functions, offering greater durability, reliability and longer warranties (5/6 years).

  • For the primary boot drive / regularly accessed secondary solution, grab a similarly priced faster NVME SSD. Essentially x2/x3 faster. 2 of these may be overkill but considering your initial requirement falls in the same potential overhead, these NVME units fill that gap with greater performance bearings for only a fraction of the cost.

  • An aftermarket 3-pci slot chunky heatsink-savvy 2080 TI (if this is the route you're taking). Better performance with factory OC + improved thermals + runs quieter. Some additional perks with some added sensory reporting.

  • 12 hours of use per day! Grab a platinum rated (more efficient) PSU and of the highest quality. Only a few bob more. Without getting into too much detail, the selected PSU drops the poorer performing EVGA G5 in it's tracks.

  • Other: Network and Wifi card not required. These are supported by the motherboard. Sound card is optional - also supported by the board. Today's audio on-board capabilities are fantastic and for the vast majority perfectly in-line with expectations. This is something you can always upgrade on if initial impressions beg for fine-tuned and crisp audio output. Back to the network options - there are additional pricey ($230+) motherboard options available with the inclusion of integrated Gigabit LAN + WIFI 6 (newer and faster AX standard). Whether these are beneficial for your particular workloads is down to user discretion.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $493.84 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Corsair H115i PRO 55.4 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $136.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $184.99 @ Best Buy
Memory G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $144.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $144.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX950 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $229.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP EX950 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $229.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital Red Pro 6 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $189.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital Red Pro 6 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $189.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $1149.99 @ Newegg
Case Thermaltake View 71 TG RGB ATX Full Tower Case $184.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Platinum 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $134.99 @ B&H
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ Other World Computing
Case Fan Cougar Dual-X 73.18 CFM 140 mm Fan $9.90 @ Amazon
Case Fan Cougar Dual-X 73.18 CFM 140 mm Fan $9.90 @ Amazon
Case Fan Cougar Dual-X 73.18 CFM 140 mm Fan $9.90 @ Amazon
Case Fan Cougar Dual-X 73.18 CFM 140 mm Fan $9.90 @ Amazon
Case Fan Cougar Dual-X 73.18 CFM 140 mm Fan $9.90 @ Amazon
Case Fan Cougar Dual-X 73.18 CFM 140 mm Fan $9.90 @ Amazon
Speakers Logitech Z200 0 nW 2.0 Channel Speakers $20.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3636.11
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-22 20:15 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "High end PC list. Opinion wanted"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If there is a part that does the same thing for less, change it, but otherwise, I'm sticking with the 9900K intel core

As with a vast majority of video editing applications, the greater the number of cores the faster the rendering completion time. The Ryzen 3900X/3950X for 4K rendering is unmatched in this regard (consumer platforms).

If this is for 4K-gaming, the 3900X/3950X delivers parallel performance compared to a 9900K.

If you intend on streaming, the higher core count AMD Ryzen again takes precedence.

With your particular use-case, the i9 makes little sense unless overclocking "enthusiasm" suggests otherwise.

I want to know if all of my selected parts will not only function but function optimally.

Did you have a parts list which you were intending on sharing with us?

And while I'm wanted specifically a 2080ti

Yummy! Very expensive cards but it does make sense for 4K gaming. [OPTIONAL] If you're targeting 4K higher refresh rate gaming, You could grab a RTX 2080 SUPER for base-line but credible performance (4K 60FPS+) and then upgrade to a beefier RTX 3000 series card when released in (hopefully) mid-2020. The performance gains achieved with the 2080 TI over the SUPER variant is not substantial enough to warrant a massive $400/$500 premium. 6-8 months from now, assuming these cards will honour their over-rated but relative pricing tiers, in the least the higher spend will see some justification for added performance gains, faster/higher capacity VRAM, etc. This ones purely down to user preference.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "MSI Tomahawk B450 Replacement"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

mATX as in micro ATX form factor? or were you meaning to pick up a "small" Mini-ITX board. I've had someone mistake mATX for mini-ITX boards in the past hence just double checking.

(assuming mATX is the path forward) - the above options provided by 2Tek_ and mark5916 are nicely paired up with the 2200G. If you're looking to upgrade CPUs later down the line to 3rd Gen or opt for higher core count options, preferably a more robust option with the likes of the 3000-series optimised MAX board (if priced reasonably): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/h7WBD3/msi-b450m-mortar-max-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-mortar-max Currently out of stock but have a look around online to locate one.....otherwise a non-MAX variant: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9C97YJ/msi-b450m-gaming-plus-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-gaming-plus Both of these options deliver added functionality, esp. "VRM cooling" to engage higher core count power munching upgrades with lesser throttling blemishes.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3600 or 2700X"

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

Generally if 6 cores are sufficient i'd fancy the nippier per core runner (3600) for gaming. For higher resolution gaming it doesn't matter. For best performance an aftermarket $30+ cooler is well-suited.

The dilemma being, the 2700X is now available for around $159 (amazon.com) and on top carries a pretty decent heatpipe driven boxed cooler. For the RGB fanatics - it delivers that aspect too. In other words "fantastic" value.

If it helps, a 3600 + a decent aftermarket cooler sits up around $220. A 2700X + stock cooler is achievable for $60 less. The question is, is $60 saved worth a few frame drops and lesser-efficiency? For some/most, YES. Performance-wise, not all is of lesser value - the 8c/16t 2700X achieves greater performance in multi-threaded tasks hence a sweet counterbalance with a $60 richer wallet (or spent elsewhere - esp. if you're restricted by budget to lesser performing/quality driven parts).

How about sharing your parts list and total budget for the build? This will add some perspective if the budget cap is tight.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AMD vs Intel"

  • 2 months ago
  • 4 points

Simplified:

INTEL

  • Marginally better single threaded performance

  • Overclocking headroom

AMD

  • Faster multi-threaded performance (or more cores)

  • Excellent value

  • Higher core count options on these consumer platforms (12core/24thread 3900X, 16c/32t 3950X). For gaming + streaming / rendering / transcoding / compression / virtualisation / etc etc - AMD pulls up way ahead

  • Upgrade possibilities on the same platform (4000 SERIES IN 2020)


why do people prefer Intel over AMD?

For the practical minds (leaving fan-boyism on the side-lines), unlike previous generation AMD CPUs, the launch of Ryzen 3rd GEN closes the gap with single threaded performance disparities. Essentially, this changes the dynamic quite significantly whereby AMD now covers all basis (narrowly trailed on par ST performance, higher core count + multithreaded support, better value and enjoys another upgrade path with 4000-series CPUs on the same platform, which are expected to launch in mid-2020)

Some may still appreciate intel for it's overclocking potential but this sort of enthusiasm compels the buyer to grab a $50-$80 CPU cooler. $80+ to achieve more reasonable performance gains. Put it this way, if you're going to run a fancy large 280/360mm AIO (or a premium air cooler) or a custom liquid loop configuration, you're most likely to adopt the intel path to put that cooling power to use > OVERCLOCKING. Otherwise the stock ST advantage is too small IMO to warrant the intel path.

I couldn’t find a good source to tell me which one is better

This time around, AMD simply wins regardless of "preference/brand leanings/accustomed life-long intimacies/etc".

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CAN I GET YOUR OPINION FOR THIS BUILD."

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

For around $600 whilst keeping the 2600X + 1650 super combo intact, a couple of trimmed perks but over-all a system which will run simply just as good:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $129.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.99 @ Amazon
Memory GeIL EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX900 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $56.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER 4 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $173.98 @ Newegg
Case Cougar MX330-X ATX Mid Tower Case $39.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $53.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $609.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-20 10:13 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "AIO pump cable"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Either header will do, they're practically the same. The only difference being, the CPU_PUMP runs at full speed by default. The CPU_FAN header can be adjusted in BIOS/UEFI to "full speed". Some prefer the CPU_FAN header for the added protection layers/notifications in relation to fan/pump failure (or more simply put, if the device associated with the header isn't working, the system fails to boot - which ultimately protects your CPU from over-heating).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CAN I GET YOUR OPINION FOR THIS BUILD."

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

For $700,

  • 4-7% faster Ryzen 2600X. Comes bundled-in with a decent stock cooler too.

  • faster NVME SSD (will come handy in OS mass code dev)

  • 3600Mhz RAM. 3200Mhz is sufficient and you're only paying around $3-$8 more for some sizeable performance to carry forward on a memory bandwidth hungry platform.

  • Better over-all performing GPU (demands way less power, achieves better performance, runs quieter - efficiency at it's best)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $129.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $62.99 @ Newegg
Storage ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $69.98 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER 4 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $173.98 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $77.79 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $699.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-19 19:21 EST-0500

The above build is fantastic for the task. But if you can push the budget a little more, you can either:

GPU promo code: $10 off available on the product listing page

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Who much wattage do i need?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

A 550W PSU will be sufficient with additional headroom for future upgrades.

Not sure how the budget measures up, but if possible the following:

  • B450 "MAX" Ryzen 3000-ready motherboard (essentially a larger BIOS chip for future upgrade possibilities)

  • A faster 1TB NVME SSD. You can always add additional storage later when needed.

  • A much more efficient and 15%+ better performing GPU. Alternatively, you have the very efficient "1650 SUPER" for around $160-$170 which delivers similar performance as the RX 590

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $129.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $62.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $89.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $239.99 @ Best Buy
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $77.79 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $715.74
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-19 10:51 EST-0500

Again depending on budget, for $30 more you have the years best VALUE cracker with 2 additional cores + a beefier heatpipe stock cooler option with the Ryzen 2700X (currently available for $159.99 on Amazon).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best value video editing pc under £1,500 - Late 2019"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi Mystigan,

A little more info needed:

  • OS required?

  • Display required?

  • Other Peripherals? (keyboard, mouse, speakers, etc)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel CPU questions for future build"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

For marginal performance gains for a heftier cost = i9. If overclocking is part-n-parcel with the build enthusiasm, the 9900K does offer some additional headroom.

Otherwise, a value packed Ryzen 3700X or a superior 12-core multi-threaded 3900X. Or, a monstrous 16 core 3950X if you fancy nippier HI-RES rendering performance for video editing. AMD path sees greater versatility for the long run with an open AM4 socket for Ryzen 4000 series CPUs (expected in mid/late 2020).

I'm planning to start a custom build sometime in the next year

If this is at the turn of 2020, the above options are valid. If later down the year, your options widen up with newer generational processors.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Curious CPU Temp Questions"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

That's a respectable outcome for this sort of double the thread CPU. The AIO is doing it's job :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC Part List Recommendation_New Zealand Based"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Not taking anything away from the above build (although i'd give the A320 mobo a miss), but a second option:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $228.50 @ 1stWave Technologies
Motherboard MSI B450M PRO-VDH Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $145.00 @ 1stWave Technologies
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN TUF Gaming Allian 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $126.72 @ Paradigm PCs
Storage Crucial P1 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $113.85 @ PB Technologies
Video Card MSI Radeon RX 570 4 GB ARMOR OC Video Card $249.00 @ 1stWave Technologies
Case Deepcool MATREXX 30 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $59.00 @ Mighty Ape
Power Supply Corsair CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $98.00 @ 1stWave Technologies
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1020.07
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-19 13:05 NZDT+1300

Considering Diablo isn't a hard-pressed graphics intense title, the RX 570 as an entry level GPU does save some money to cut loose some of the forced compromises.

This is down to user requirement/preference but here's what the above build offers:

  • A B450 motherboard: Out of the box compatibility without having to resort to BIOS updates using a previous GEN CPU (not all A320s are compatible/some lack feature support), more current chipset, greater optimisation for memory consistency, supports improved on-board cooling mechanisms to tap into the CPU's peak performance, supports overclocking, etc. The B450 chipset further supports 3rd GEN (and hopefully 4th GEN CPUs) which adds excellent value for a future upgrade path.

  • A faster + double the capacity 500GB NVME SSD. Granted, a SATA driven 500GB unit would suffice too for $10-$20 less but being NVME units are much more affordable nowadays, personally for me it's a tough one to pass. In a vast number of workloads, whether you opt for SATA or NVME x2/x3 superior speeds the performance goes unnoticed and where applicable the in specific heavier read/write conditions, or transfer speeds, the performance is vastly significant.

  • RX 570 GPU. As mentioned earlier, for the game you mentioned (presumably for 1080p 60fps performance targets), the RX 570 easily achieves this type of performance (.... and better). In some more graphically intense demanding games the RX 570 begins to narrowly show its age but "carries plenty of mileage" under the clock with down-tuned in-game quality configurations. You'd be surprised my nephews 570 plays some of the tougher AAA-titles with a mix of a medium/high settings whilst securing some real eye-candy for visual quality @ 60fps. For lesser graphically challenging titles the RX 570 straps plenty of juice for excellent gaming performance. If you can raise the budget - the GTX 1650 SUPER does push ahead with a 15% performance gain and enjoys excellent efficiency (lesser power draw).

  • PSU: 450W is adequate for this sort of build. 550W for only $9 more opens up additional headroom for greater future upgrade possibilities.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Curious CPU Temp Questions"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Unigine Heaven is a GPU-tasked stress test and not-so imposing on CPU resources.

For CPU load intensity, some of the best roughneck stress tests can be achieved with Prime95/Aida64 and a couple of others. Where overclocking isn't a concern, i prefer RealBench benchmarking to keep things a little more "realistic" opposed to the heavier synthetic test crunch approach (not realistic, but closer to lifelike representations for the vast majority of workloads)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Where to downgrade and how to solve the issues?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The list is set on private - uncheck the private setting.

Post images? ....are you referring to the parts list snapshot? If yes, select the icon highlighted in this link (eg) https://imgur.com/K0xHqIF, copy the code and paste into your post and thats it.

And I noticed this setup has some issues with the sata ports, thoughts?

I'm assuming you're referring to NVME SSD disabling SATA ports? If yes, this is normal. The NVME and SATA port share the same lane/s hence with the M.2 port utilised, one or two of the corresponding SATA port/s will be disabled. You don't need to do anything other than check the mobo manual to see which one/s are disabled and avoid them when adding additional storage devices.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3600 vs 3600x"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Not worth it.

The 3600X sees negligible performance gains to warrant the hassle for an exchange. At the time of purchase, for $10 more the marginally better performing bundled cooler which comes with the 3600X would have been nice but compares miserably with much better aftermarket cooler options. Save the $10, save the return/exchange postal costs, add a little more and you've got enough for a decent $30/$35 cooler.

If it helps "a 3600 + decent aftermarket cooler" is overall a much better investment opposed to a "3600X + stock cooler".

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2080 Ti "Budget" Build"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

if sticking with an 8-core 2nd GEN Ryzen CPU, for a measly 10 bucks more upgrade to a 2700X. A staggering increase in performance for this sort of upgrade value + the addition of the liquid heatpipe Wraith Prism stock cooler (which outshines the Wraith Spire by a long-shot). Have you considered Ryzen 3rd GEN?

Preferably a faster NVME SSD as these are similarly priced for around $100-$115

PSU: The "Essential" line-up from Silverstone is a wedge between entry-level but efficient and higher-tier power supply units. It's a decent unit but for around $100-$120 there are better and more robust options available for powerhouse performance.

The rest looks good. The 2080 TI begs the question, is this for 4K gaming?

Comment reply on Forum Topic ".....someone told me me that the 'b450 tomahawk' is a regular size and not a small size, i dont how it could've been possible for this site to recommend this 'b450 tomahawk' when it doesnt even fit the requirements that were listed:"

  • 2 months ago
  • 4 points

This is the second thread initiated by you, which shows great emphasis on undermining the PCPP community (i'm sure there's probably more...)

Statements like:

-"i dont know how other ppl on the web are able to read but that isnt the case for this site"

-"in all other cases im gonna the recommendation elsewhere and not from this site"

-"i cannot believe that the users on other sites knows the basics of how to read"

-"how incredibly unknowledgeable the vast majority of ppl are"*

....are bad-mannered and out-right disrespectful. If someone has made an error in recommending an incompatible part, there's no need to point fingers at everyone. People make mistakes. Even someone like myself with 15 years+ experience in PC building makes mistakes and I'm also an active participant on 2 other popular hardware websites where "incompatible user input" is not fail-proof (as seen time and again).

I'm seeing a ton of complaints but hardly any substance in your approach. In fact, in one of your previous "complaint-full" threads I actually attempted to assist by providing a more practical method in achieving whatever it is that you're trying to achieve. To-date you failed to even provide the most basic details pertaining to the intended use and budget. In my opinion, you're just taking the piss with a boorish attitude.

Which brings me to..... (not on behalf of PCPP and it's moderators or it's member)..... either apologise for the insolence or follow your own advice: "...... im gonna the recommendation elsewhere and not from this site....."

(btw, "i'm gonna the recommendation" doesn't make sense - see you're a living example of the fallible and forgivable man. Only no one is scolding you with taking the piss out of the English language - Why? Because we respect one another, which ultimately constructs a healthy online community)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is AMD Ryzen 3900x my best choice?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

3900X - definitely a worthy candidate for these types of multi-threaded orientated workflows (esp. streaming/encoding and video rendering)

If this is something you require with immediate effect go for it - excellent CPU. If it's something you're considering a little later down the line, Ryzen 4000-series is expected to launch sometime mid/late 2020 with newer X670 chipsets. The initial reports indicated 2020 1st quarter releases for 4000-series but it seems these will be mobile platform based CPUs with desktop chips expected a little later on.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "choosing a CPU"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Generally speaking, the person who made that comment seems "BONKERS". In it's price-category the 2600 is a champion. Even though AMDs moved onto 3rd GEN CPU offerings with the likes of the 3600/3600X/3700Xc (which compete with the best of intel CPUs),the 2600/2600X/2700X remain fantastic options considering "value" + future-proof expatiating "multi-threaded" support which is lacking on the intel side.

For a more practical solution:

  • what is the intended purpose of use? (gaming, streaming, editing, rendering, etc)

  • BUDGET? Also if you're focused on building something from scratch it would be a good idea to provide the full budget with all parts/peripherals included. This will help us to determine where the money is best utilised for a more balanced approach.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building first pc"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Just looking for a little advice.

Not sure what type of advice you're looking for.

  1. Compatibility?

  2. Improvements?

  3. Whether the same performance can be achieved by spending less?

Help us help you:

  1. Purpose of use (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

  2. Are you planning on overclocking to get a little more juice out of the 9900K? If yes, the Gigabyte Aorus Master or Asrock Taichi/ultimate stand taller for 5.0Ghz+ OC. Or, if you prefer MSI, the MSI Godlike (if reasonably priced). A couple of ASUS options equally match up but terribly in terms of value (over-priced, IMO).

  3. If gaming, what display resolution and refresh rate are you targeting? (eg. 1080p 144hz/1440p/4K/etc)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this upgradeable and or build new?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The 3700X comes with a bundled cooler which is great for a stock unit. The only downer being it can get a little loud when ramped up (for some perfectly fine and bearable acoustics). This is an area where you can try out the boxed cooler and if it's not to your satisfaction you can always upgrade later.

If you opt for the Ryzen 3600 which bundles in a crappy cooler, you'll want something like this: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/HyTPxr/cooler-master-hyper-212-black-edition-420-cfm-cpu-cooler-rr-212s-20pk-r1 or if you don't mind spending a little more for a beefier unit: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/8GBrxr/scythe-mugen-5-rev-b-512-cfm-cpu-cooler-scmg-5100


PSU - If you prefer something newer for the brand-spanking new build (personally I would), preferably something like this (fully modular + excellent efficiency rating): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qxcMnQ/fsp-group-power-supply-hg750 or if you're happy with semi-modular units with good enough efficiency ratings and fancy saving a little cash: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/CVkD4D/corsair-power-supply-cx750m


The above will set the bar higher, above the $1500 initial budget plan. If you want to stay within this cap, take the Ryzen 3600 CPU + aftermarket cooler. Whether it's a 3600/3700X you have zero concerns with performance drops as both deliver parallel performance. The 3700X would be nice for future-proofing but I'd prefer the 3600 with an earlier upgrade path (4/5 years) for more meaningful gains.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "b450 - let's talk about the b450 mobo conclusively"

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

seems any of the important info is inaccesible by ppl

Fully accessible if you understand the basics. Product listings generally provide all the relevant information. Manufacturer product listings on their respective websites will provide a more detailed spec.

All you need to do is identify which CPU you require for your workload and then compare compatible motherboard options only. You don't need to look at various types of motherboards/chipsets. For example, if you're looking to grab a Ryzen 3700X CPU, you only need to look at B450/X570 motherboards. If it's an intel i7-9700K/9900K CPU, you only need to compare Z390 motherboards. I guess I can understand things may appear rather complex at first but once you get to grips with some basics, it gets so much simpler.

seems like the best thing to do is to just buy an apple

or a banana lol

In fact, legend has it, once you go apple you go bananas

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New build opinions please"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Huh didn't see that it wasn't NVME, but tbh you're not the only person who says I won't notice the difference.

You'd be surprised, fast SATA-interface SSDs are just as quick. NVMEs are more "enterprise-class" storage solutions where higher sequential read/write speeds allows users to complete "specific" higher IOPs workloads quicker. For the vast majority of consumers, the employed workloads are incapable of saturating even SATA-driven storage solutions hence you're not losing any performance whether on paper or real world noticeable speeds.

If you've got specific ideas about alternative cases, I'm all ears;

One of these options being - what you had originally selected: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/CbqhP6/cooler-master-masterbox-nr600-wo-odd-atx-mid-tower-case-mcb-nr600-kgnn-s00

Other option:

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/3RJmP6/phanteks-eclipse-p400a-atx-mid-tower-case-ph-ec400atg_bk

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this upgradeable and or build new?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

$1500 is plenty. Hence 3 options:

OPTION 1

  • Including a higher refresh rate (144hz) GSYNC/VA panel display

  • RTX 2060 SUPER graphics card for smoother 100-120fps gaming (demanding titles on top settings)

  • Ryzen 3600 CPU is more than sufficient with 6 cores + multi-threaded support

  • PSU carried forward as it's more than adequate. These 10 year warranty HX models are a blast.

  • CPU cooler carried forward, its a decent entry level aftermarket cooler and with a newer airflow friendlier case you can expect some improvements in thermals/noise-levels

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $0.00
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.98 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $94.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $419.99 @ Best Buy
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair Professional 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Case Fan be quiet! Pure Wings 2 140 PWM 61.2 CFM 140 mm Fan $12.89 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fan be quiet! Pure Wings 2 140 PWM 61.2 CFM 140 mm Fan $12.89 @ SuperBiiz
Monitor MSI Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $189.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1175.69
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-15 20:42 EST-0500

OPTION 2

  • Including a higher refresh rate (144hz) GSYNC/VA panel display (no change)

  • RTX 2070 SUPER graphics card. For the FPS enthusiast who fancies 10-15% performance gains. Personally I'd stick with a 2060 super and look for an earlier upgrade in 3-5 years.

  • Ryzen 3700X CPU = 8 cores + multi-threaded support. More cores = future proofing. Personally (again), i'd prefer the 3600 as 6 cores are plenty and look for an earlier upgrade in a few years. If your other workloads are higher core count savvy or if you fancy streaming alongside gaming, the 8-core provision becomes highly desirable.

  • PSU carried forward as it's more than adequate. These 10 year warranty HX models are a blast. (no change)

  • CPU cooler carried forward, its a decent entry level aftermarket cooler and with a newer airflow friendlier case you can expect some improvements in thermals/noise-levels (no change, id give it a go first and see how things pan out as swapping out later is super easy - should it come to that)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $0.00
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.98 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $94.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB BLACK GAMING Video Card $519.99 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair Professional 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Case Fan be quiet! Pure Wings 2 140 PWM 61.2 CFM 140 mm Fan $12.89 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fan be quiet! Pure Wings 2 140 PWM 61.2 CFM 140 mm Fan $12.89 @ SuperBiiz
Monitor MSI Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $189.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1395.69
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-15 20:50 EST-0500

OPTION 3

Same as OPTION 2 but a higher resolution 1440p 144hz gaming display. I don't know how to sell this one other than suggesting "i absolutely can't for the life of me switch back to 1080p gaming since purchasing a sharper detailed 1440p screen, which is significantly larger in size and adds real value for immersive gameplay". With a 2070 super graphics card in the mix you're potentially looking at 90-110fps in demanding games with ultra quality game profiles. A very respectable performance achievement with this sort of hardware.

If you prefer 1440p gaming but fancy spending a little less.....drop the 3700X to a RYZEN 3600. Performance-wise you won't notice any difference at all.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $0.00
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.98 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $94.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB BLACK GAMING Video Card $519.99 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair Professional 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Case Fan be quiet! Pure Wings 2 140 PWM 61.2 CFM 140 mm Fan $12.89 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fan be quiet! Pure Wings 2 140 PWM 61.2 CFM 140 mm Fan $12.89 @ SuperBiiz
Monitor MSI Optix MAG27CQ 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $299.99 @ Walmart
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1505.69
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-15 20:57 EST-0500

Sorry dude i'm off to bed....feel free to drop your thoughts or questions and i'll respond tomorrow.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this upgradeable and or build new?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

That's enough to secure a "killer" performance build. Well depends on the following:

  1. Is that US dollars? GBP/CAD/AUS/ETC?

  2. I'm assuming you already have the peripherals and operating system (Windows)

  3. Speaking of peripherals, if you have a display already and plan on sticking with it.... whats the display resolution and refresh rate? (for eg. 1080p 60hz). This will help to determine which graphics card is best without over-spending.

  4. If you have any particular preferences, have those listed (eg, case type/form factor, colour arrangements, RGB, desire for quiet acoustics, storage capacity, or anything else that comes to mind)

Comment reply on Dacmyth's Completed Build: 7MM Red Water Mini

  • 2 months ago
  • 3 points

People are impressed with 7nm SC manufacturing processes, wait until they see what the human hands are capable of. This has Yoda patience written all over it and that inch-perfect compactness redefines "all good things come in small packages" +1

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