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Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thoughts on my part list for my 1st gaming Build."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

sounds good!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Excellent find!! Glad the poster provided links to more official sources.

Sad though, one of my favourite brands under scrutiny :( , i have 2 Seasonic golds on the roll, fortunately for me i've got them in lesser GPU intense builds for work purposes. I guess we'll have to wait for "V2" to continue the fan-boy'ism

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

What recent issues....i'm oblivious to such finds?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

So I think it would be better to get a wifi card and not limit myself to on board wifi.

That works too! Out of preference you might appreciate on-board/integrated WIFI to keep the PCI slots below the GPU vacant. Ideally for 2 reasons, 1) if you prefer a cleaner looking build through the tempered glass 2) Keeping the GPU fans clear of obstruction (air-flow friendlier) without a WIFI card sitting below. Performance wise, 2) isn't a problem as temps see very little or zero difference either way. Potential 3) this ones more for workstation class builds, but sparing yourself PCI lanes for other upgrades.

None of the above present any concrete reasons not to go the WIFI PCIE card route - hence feel free to weigh-in your options.

I also have some misgivings about the 660p. I here mixed things. Some say its got shite read/write speed and I should just get a big HDD drive with a 1tb higher quality SSD. Others say I won't notice a difference if its only for gaming, I'm assuming you are more on this side if you changed out my other storage for it.

To put it into perspective (not the best analogy but should make sense): It's like buying the fastest car available (Bugatti Veyron @ 270mph) when restricted to road limits of 60mph. What you have is an excellent car, but it's not going to reach the full potential it's designed for (speed). Likewise, there are professional grade NVME SSDs with superior R/W speeds, which are simply inaccessible or remain under-utilised especially with workloads consisting of gaming/browsing/multi-tasking/general use and even various professional use-cases. For these types of workloads, literally - vastly under-utilised! Whereby, even a 660p is too fast, but since "value" is king, it's achievable.

There are specific workstation class "higher IOPs" workflows where superior performing NVMEs annihilate the lesser performance savvy units in terms of raw performance and longevity. These are workflows consisting of heavier virtualisation, massive bulk data-packaged read/write functions, scratch disks.......infomatics sequencing....or if you're working with tons of GB's of data packets or Media files on the regular there is the benefit of superior transfer rates, etc etc. On the other hand, for a gaming build, 660p is going to deliver the same performance as lets say a superior 970 PRO from Samsung.

Problem is, reviewers using synthetic benchmarks show these wonderful performance bars surpassing the more consumer-driven NVME SSDs without any mention of "use-case" scenarios (well some of that blame is user-driven too). Hence the general public is left with a dilemma, assuming a faster SSD is going to deliver some tangible return. It happens more commonly than one may suspect. At best, these enterprise-driven NVMEs might secure you a "1-2 seconds faster windows boot/game load time" but that's compensated already with a 2TB consumer-level SSD. The larger the SSD, the greater the number of NAND chips = more performance, lesser latency + increased endurance.

Bottom line: For your build purpose, in real-world perceivable performance, the 660p delivers at an equal footing with the best of NVMEs available.....and @ 2TB capacity it's nothing short of "excellent value & performance".

Also thoughts on 2070S and 2080S reference card? If 2070S card has temp problems and I have to spend a lot more money for a good AIB card, starts to get to the point where I might as well get a 2080S anyway. I know the EVGA 2070S XC gaming is around 620$ rn on Newegg.

The 2070 SUPER "FE" hangs below 75c - very respectable temp, well within it's safety zone.

The 2080 SUPER "FE" drops below 80c - again very respectable temp, well within it's safety zone.

For both options, if you want improved temps with beefier cooling solutions (more of an enthusiastic approach rather than "a must"), you'll be looking for an AIB solution in excess of $30-$50 (or more, depending on preference). Benefits: Not just for cooling alone, but some factory overclocked performance gains + lower acoustic range + i guess aesthetics, as FE cards usually stand out like a sore thumb in builds which are targeting specific colour schemes. If you fancy saving money with a 2080 SUPER FE, there's always the options of downvolting the card at the expense of a small fraction of lost FPS. Not a big deal - i'm currently running a 1080 TI which hits up around 78c in most games, and a couple of select titles @ 83-85c (wasn't the best 1080 ti option available at the time, but excellent value by comparison). With an under-clocked profile to keep it at 75-80c, i'm only losing 3fps, give or take. These cards are very capable of handling 83c, only my demented and manic state of mind has an odd preference to sit at 80/below (i know, the over-amplified madness of it all).

"Preferences" with temps, acoustics and aesthetics will come at a cost, but feasible within a $2K budget.

I know the EVGA 2070S XC gaming is around 620$ rn on Newegg.

  • 5% performance gain over the FE
  • 75-77c on load
  • 38dba (not the quietest, but at this performance range I wouldn't expect otherwise)

Overall, a great option

$30 more (or less, if cashing in on mail rebate) for a lightly better optimised option with some added OC push, similar temps/noise levels.....adding a little confidence with more positive user feedback: https://www.newegg.com/evga-geforce-rtx-2080-super-08g-p4-3182-kr/p/N82E16814487464?Item=N82E16814487464&nm_mc=AFC-RAN-COM&cm_mmc=AFC-RAN-COM&utm_medium=affiliates&utm_source=afc-PCPartPicker&AFFID=2558510&AFFNAME=PCPartPicker&ACRID=1&ASID=https%3a%2f%2fpcpartpicker.com%2fproduct%2fqHNgXL%2fevga-geforce-rtx-2080-super-8-gb-xc-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3182-kr&ranMID=44583&ranEAID=2558510&ranSiteID=8BacdVP0GFs-wKKh1OYJuDlAKkKQrSfb4g

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Game developing + graphic design + gaming"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Unlock the parts list, it's set on private.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I think this is it..."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Absolutely, the 3900X all the way. Simply put, simultaneous loads with the likes of gaming and streaming need as many cores as possible to avoid diminishing returns in gaming performance. Future gaming titles are more leaning towards utilising 6/8 cores + DX12 is no stranger here either, as it scales better with more cores. With a 3900X in place, all these likely shortfalls are avoided and you've got yourself a solid streamlined build with future proofing written all over it.

Another area where the 3900X advances: Most gamers are more likely to stream using basic presets @ 1080p for which an 8-core CPU is adequate. With growing bandwidths at the ISP side, higher resolution capture cards or possibilities opening up (streaming clients adopting the same principle) and the enthusiasm for higher quality encoding configurations - this is all possible with a 12-core 3900X. Hence the more versatile investment for the long run before being forced to upgrade to newer hardware.

....and the if so, would I be better looking at AMD graphics cards or is the 2080ti still solid?

This is a tough one! The RTX 2080 TI is the best available GPU at the moment and AMD RX-series GPUs are nowhere to be seen at this higher-end of the spectrum. It's certainly the best card for higher resolution gaming but with a major drawback - "it's way over-priced". GPU's today are already pretty expensive, with RX 5700XT and RTX 2070 SUPER being sufficient for 1440p gaming (90-100fps in demanding games on top settings). Graphics cards surpassing these 2 options get more pricey, and when evaluating performance to cost ratios, there is a clear distinction of "bad value". For example (based on 1440p):

  • the RTX 2080 SUPER delivers an average of 20fps more over the 2070 SUPER for a whopping $200-$250 premium on top.

  • the RTX 2080 TI delivers an average of 20fps more over the 2080 SUPER for a whopping $300-$400 premium on top ($500-$550 in your case with the beefed up AIB ASUS model)

These majestic stretched premiums ($$$s) for condensed performance advantages, is mostly NVIDIAs way of saying "we are dominant with higher-end gaming cards and shall choose to profit as much as we can"

It boils down to user preference. If you absolutely want the best card regardless of value, i guess the RTX 2080 TI will get you there. If you want to save money $500, the RTX 2080 SUPER offers excellent performance for 1440p 144hz gaming. A 20fps difference is unnoticeable in real-world perceptible comparisons. The 2080 Super easily hits 144fps in a number of gaming titles, or 120fps in some of the more graphically intense games/environments (120fps @ 1440p is excellent). A nice mix of High/ultra settings will easily saturate 144hz without compromising noticeable performance in games, hence the RTX 2080 super is more than capable of matching the 2080 TI. Personally i'd stick with the RTX 2080 SUPER and save the $500 for a quicker GPU upgrade with newer offerings down the line, where hopefully the performance advantages are far greater and worthier for the added spend.

2080 SUPER / 2080 TI - your choice!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

I am also not 100% sure on the case. I picked out a simplistic looking one that doesn’t have any RGB on it. Is the case I have okay, or do you have any recommendations?

Excellent case option. In it's price-class you can't beat the Meshify C!! It even competes with some of the more expensive models and comes out on top in various aspects (IMO).

And I might upgrade my monitors in the future to 1440p, so a PC that can still manage good framerates on a higher res monitor.

1440p easy! The 2070 Super at this RES should manage an average of 90-100fps (demanding games/ultra settings).

The cost of what my goal is seems to be around 1800-2000 range.

Nice budget!

  • You might as well as grab a board supporting WIFI 6 (or AX upgrade). Just faster, higher bandwidths + cleaner transmissions (lesser interference). At some point you'll want to upgrade your router to a AX compliant one to tap into this enhanced performance. If using ethernet (best solution), don't worry about AX and revert back to the ASUS TUF to save $50. Other minor benefits with a $260 board: Slightly better audio chip, beefier VRM solution (doesn't matter if not overclocking) + heatsinks for M.2 SSD.

  • You might as well ditch the spinning hard drive. Staying well within the budget, you can pick up a single 2TB fast SSD. The higher the capacity (more nand chips) the faster and lesser latency. Moreover, this opens the possibility of running all your games/media on the SSD in benefit of faster game load times + in-game asset management. (use the M.2_1 header to plug in the SSD. It's linked directly to the CPU hence lesser latency)

  • GPU - the EVGA aftermarket card uses a larger heatsink (across three PCI slots - yummy), factory OC'd for a higher boost clock and overclocking a little better too (purely optional)

  • Better quality PSU with a long standing approval rating at the highest degree.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $329.00 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler $48.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI MPG X570 GAMING PRO CARBON WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard $259.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $89.67 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $184.99 @ B&H
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $539.99 @ Best Buy
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $104.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.95 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1778.53
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-16 12:18 EDT-0400

Take this one lightly - if you are considering 1440p higher refresh rate gaming (144hz) and fancy higher FPS returns (around 20-30fps more) in demanding gaming on top settings, there is the option of grabbing a RTX 2080 SUPER. This is achievable within the $2000 budget. The 2070 SUPER will easily deliver plenty of performance at 1440p, but if want to go the full mile, it's possible. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/RqkgXL/nvidia-geforce-rtx-2080-super-8-gb-video-card-900-1g180-2540-000 or https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qHNgXL/evga-geforce-rtx-2080-super-8-gb-xc-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3182-kr

Comment reply on Forum Topic "GPU Discussion: To Super or not to Super"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

For $500 the Nvidia founders edition: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/3sJmP6/nvidia-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-video-card-900-1g180-2515-000

$540 - partner card: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/xxrYcf/evga-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-xc-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3172-kr

The $540 option, although has 2 axial fans, houses a huge chunky heatsink spread across 3 PCI slots. Personally I love the industrial look with HSF fins in the face :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "I think this is it..."

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Have you considered the newer 3RD GEN RYZEN 3900X?

  • If 3D rendering plays a significant role alongside viewport modelling, the Ryzen 3900X (12 cores/24 threads) makes for the better all-rounder solution (IMO, by a clear mile). 3D applications are seen to be best optimised for higher core-count deployment. If your workflow heavily relies on faster rendering, the 3900X surpasses the i9 by 50% in multi-threaded throughput (a more consistent range across the board: 40-45%'ish).

  • Same principle applies to Streaming Video practices. With an average of 45% performance gain. The added core/threaded functionality here eliminates performance hits on the gaming side. Since games are already utilising 6/8 cores, a 12 core 3900X makes a pretty strong case for future proofing. You may end up streaming higher quality content (bitrates/quality presets) or higher resolutions (shifting past 1080p). The i9 will struggle at this range or will filter through nicely but leaving the lesser desired greater performance hit on the game end of the spectrum.

  • From a gaming perspective, at 1440p (or higher resolutions), both the 3900X and 9900K deliver the same performance (FPS). Maybe a 1-2fps difference, which is nowhere near significant enough to discount the vastly superior multi-threaded performance achievable with a 3900X. Overclocking the 9900K doesn't see any significantly meaningful performance either, maybe a couple/few FPS more which in real-world refinements is nowhere near perceptible.

  • For a long time coming the argument of viewport responsiveness with AMD chips is now no longer a concern. The 3rd GEN 3900X sees a 10-15% uplift in IPC or vastly superior performance shift coming from the TR series. The i9 at stock holds too much of a negligible advantage (real-world noticeable performance) to snub the more advantageous RAW processing power of the 3900X. Granted, the i9's higher clock frequency via OC does differ here if viewport tool manipulation holds higher precedence. And more importantly, if the application employed is better optimised with the intel solution (at the code-level), the i9 would be a difficult one to avoid. Otherwise for the best balance of both worlds (tool responsiveness + rendering), the 3900X comes out ahead by a long shot.

  • Other benefits: The AMD X570 motherboard supports PCIE 4.0 which does open up additional future proofing options. The CPU socket, also supports the up-n-coming 3950X (16core/32thread) chip and may have additional support (refresh chips) beyond the 2020 scope. The upgrade path here is far more lucrative with the i9-9900K hitting a dead wall on the current intel 300-series platform. Seeing you have WIFI connectivity integrated into the motherboard, if that's a must requirement, a £250 X570 offers the newer AX band (or WIFI 6) for higher bandwidths, faster transmissions and lesser interference (if hard-wiring, you can't beat that)


Well that was a mouthful. As long as you have the options open, feel free to build your boat and sail the 7 seas. If you can afford a luxuriously expensive 2080 TI, i'm sure 32GB of RAM (2x16GB config) would be easy. A nice future proof headroom (and practical) for both gaming and streaming simultaneous loads + 3D modelling. It's always a good idea to maximise on the potential, being a dual-kit configuration receives best performance on dual controller motherboards (whether intel/AMD). Later on upgrades, can suffer from latencies, poorer consistency with sharper timing controls or overclocks.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NZXT Kraken X72 or Corsair H150i Pro"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

A 280mm CLC from EVGA outpacing a 360mm H150i isn't of surprise.

The H150i's primary objective is "noise levels" with lower rated RPM fans with a reduction of 50% in acoustics whilst maintaining similar performance to a 280mm kit with a more robust static press (2000RPM+). In other words, not so performance driven in terms of improved thermals, but should be seeing a much lesser discrepancy then 10c (which may be a result of other variables). Assuming the OP is planning on overclocking the living daylights out of the paired CPU, if the thermals are absolute key, he'd be better off with a cheaper 360mm cooler for over a $100 (something like a Fractals S36) with some robust 2000RPM PWM fans at a similar cost/price range which will overshadow any of the above 3/4 options (alternatively if the budget permits, at a similar acoustic range as the CLC280, the Noctua I-PPC-3000(RPM) would blast the charts here).

EDIT: A direct competitor for a more robust temp-resolve solution from Corsair is it's 280mm H115 model which should perform comparably with the CLC-280

Comment reply on Forum Topic "DO YOU KNOW IF INTELL AND AMD WILL RELEASE NEW CPUS THE NEXT YEAR?/2020?"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

SORRY, I DIDN'T GET THAT....COME AGAIN....HELLO....UGHH!!!....CAN YOU HEAR ME?? (hehe)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Phanteks Evolv X Dual System for Gaming, Streaming and 3D work."

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Looks good

x570 Motherboard, not sure which yet.

Preferably x2 GPU reinforced PCIE slots. 3d design workloads scale well on dual/multi-GPU arrangements. Something you might consider upgrading to later.

If using WIFI, get a board which supports WIFI "AX" (Wifi 6). Later if you choose to upgrade to an AX router, you'll receive much better bandwidth, speeds and lesser interference from the surrounding environment. Although, if accessible, for streaming you can't beat the ethernet hard-wiring connect (always BEST).

From classic reviews from respectable reviewers, the ASUS and GIGABYTE boards are showing up more favourable with improved power stages + VRM cooling. If you're targeting a 3900X/3950X, i'd fancy those enhanced features especially if overclocking to stabilise a little more performance across the board is something of interest. The following 2 are great:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/YTWBD3/gigabyte-x570-aorus-ultra-atx-am4-motherboard-x570-aorus-ultra

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/CLkgXL/asus-rog-strix-x570-e-gaming-atx-am4-motherboard-rog-strix-x570-e-gaming

These are already pretty expensive and have you covered in every respect. Anything above this point is more of an enthusiast range, unless there are specific features which you might have some use for (or aesthetics, if that matters - well these 2 look pretty enough, no Loreal make-up needed here lol).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Whenever I read up on the 5700 XT everyone was saying its almost as good as the 2070 Super but its for 400 dollars, but the blower cooler seems to be a big problem.

In your type of case arrangement, blower type cards shouldn't exist. There are a couple air-flow choked cases (older, smaller variety) which can benefit with exhausting hot air at the rear but the temps and noise levels are disturbing to say the least. What we can't argue is "value". In constrained budget builds, where one is fighting tooth and nail to secure a higher end gaming platform - a $400 dollar RX 5700 XT blower absolutely makes sense. It is what it is, excellent value for narrowly comparable performance - regardless of noise, air-exhaust form or thermals. An open-air type $450/$470 beefier partner RX 5700 XT still presents some savings and if you did opt for one, you're not losing much performance at 1080p hence it's still a solid purchase!!

What it boils down to here is whether that $50 raise for the 2070 super and it's plentiful perks (as listed in the previous post) is worth your money. For me, it's a WIN as long as it's "comfortably" within your buying capacity.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/wBjYP3 How is this motherboard and power supply?

Just a couple of queries before you finalise on the full package.

  1. What was your original budget for the build (where you are most comfortable)?

  2. Did you want RGB RAM?

  3. (A side note): If gaming is the only purpose here and you fancy saving some money - a $200 Ryzen 3600 will deliver the same game performance as a 3700X. The 2 additional cores on the 3700X is more of an enthusiastic future proof approach whilst the 6-core 12 threaded 3600, IMO, is more than enough power to carry forward. But then again, who knows where we'll be in 3-5 years with gaming demands. A good approach: if you see yourself upgrading the build anyway in 3-5 years stick with the 3600. If it's a 5yrs+ long term investment the 3700X should be worthwhile.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "GPU Discussion: To Super or not to Super"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Is that jump in price on these cards really worth the money for the higher end?

Shifting past the 2070 Super, which for most is already a pleasantly expensive GPU but in current market dynamics worth the spend, the higher-end options from this point on just take the pee pee with smaller performance gains and HUGE asking premiums. The 2080 TI takes the pee pee x2 seeing NVIDIA holds dominion at the highest level with zero competition in sight. As a result the fattened up asking price is better served for those who just want the best, regardless of performance to cost "justice".

How does a 2070 super stack up to a base 2080

2080 - 5% performance lead but for a whopping $150-$200 asking price. 2070 SUPER = exceedingly better value by a long shot! If you're looking at the 2080 range, the 2080 SUPER for $50 more delivers a more meaningful advantage of 10-15%


I'm not well versed in GPUs enough to really make an I formed decision.

Assuming you want the best and the budget is healthy:

  • 1080p 144hz gaming - 2070 Super

  • 1440p 144hz / 4K gaming - 2080 Super

It boils down to your performance targets. Assuming your display is 1080p and locked at 60hz (capable of achieving 60fps max), all of the above options will become pointless (overkill). A $200 card will will saturate that output easily (eg GTX 1660 TI)

So what display resolution and refresh rate are you targeting?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Phanteks Evolv X Dual System for Gaming, Streaming and 3D work."

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

I've heard the ryzen 9 3950x is coming out soon.

You'll want to check how well your application scales across 16 cores. Generally 3d applications are well optimised to run on as many cores possible. Most in-house manipulation tools will favour the faster single threaded performance offered via the i9-9900K, but for pure scalable rendering throughput, the 3950X opens up greater opportunities to complete projects in minimum time.

If I had that in my gaming pc ATX board along with an RTX 2080ti and then in my ITX streamer have the ryzen 9 3900? Or would that be overkill?

Yep overkill!

The streaming build generally doesn't require more than 4 cores for basic 1080p streams @ 60fps. For higher quality streams or higher resolution output (also achievable on a 4 core multi-threaded chip) a Ryzen 1600/2600 is more than enough power to fire up the desired configuration. With a limitless budget and plausible overkill the 8 core multi-threaded Ryzen 2700 presents excellent value. Anything above this range is just in plain-view "OVERKILL" and pointless IMO unless you're targeting higher bitrate 4K resolutions which is not the norm by any standard (if the idea is to stream gaming content to YT, twitch, etc).

If you're going with a 3900X/3950X, you'll want to run everything on the same system.

  • Games don't require more than 4/6 cores at the moment. That leaves you a whopping 6-10 cores to smash streaming into pieces at any desired configuration. Even if games start more comfortably applying themselves on 8 cores, that's still 4-8 additional cores with an abundantly superior processing power via 50%-100% increase in multi-threaded workloads. Even 4K streams - EASY! This type of set up will also eliminate the need for a capture card and will make your working environment far more efficient to use and "easier" accessibility (less switching up all the time)

  • It's a given, the 3D projects should also be 100% secured on the primary gaming platform as the GPU rendering performance is super fast in this type of applications.

Here's what I suggest:

  • For the enthusiasm engagement (assuming the spend has no limits), grab a second mini-ITX anyway. I have a similar setup (although 2 dedicated systems), whereby the second system is used for accounting, banking, confidential record safe-keeping and occasionally multi-tasking (browsers/etc). I'm sure you will have a number of use-case scenarios whilst gaming and streaming (or working) on the primary. For something like this, the following is more the sufficient:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor $79.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus ROG Strix B450-I Gaming Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard $149.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $229.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-15 14:19 EDT-0400
  • For a more robust (overkill) approach for the second side-runner, you'd be looking at going the intel route with CPU integrated graphics as higher-core count AMD options will demand a dedicated GPU.

  • Other benefit being, you can always upgrade the second dual-system with a beefier CPU option should nature call.

How much ram? 64gb & 32gb?

For gaming and streaming, although 16GB is more than enough....32GB would be a nice place to be for future proofing. 32GB is also more than sufficient for 3D-design unless there are workloads belonging to applications which are known to scale higher. Start with 32GB and should your workloads saturate this level of memory, you can easily upgrade by picking up a second kit to complete a 64GB package.

Would I need a switcher for peripherals?

  • Keep in mind, if streaming on the second build - a capture card will be needed!!

  • If your desk space allows, i prefer dedicated peripherals (incl. displays). Basically 2-sets of keyboards, mouse, speakers, etc. Depends on your use-case, i tend to run both machines all the time (literally) hence it's a little easier without having to switch up. If you're only occasionally applying yourself to the second build use, and want to save deskspace/money, there's plenty of options available to share peripherals across both platforms. You'll have to look into this further as I have zero experience with share-switching.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3.5mm mic not working, problem is on pc side"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks like it may have been a mish mash driver issue between the Windows and Mobo audio package.

Glad you got it sorted!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

For $10 more, you might also be interested in these newer Ryzen-optimised RGB memory kits from G.Skill: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/DwVG3C/gskill-trident-z-neo-16-gb-2-x-8-gb-ddr4-3600-memory-f4-3600c18d-16gtzn

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggested changes before ordering (Gaming)"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Some of the more beefier AIB RX 5700 XT cards (great for the cooling solution but not so much OC'd performance attained) are costing as much as $450-$470. That's up to $70 over the more lucrative $400 blower type range.

My problem with the above is, with your type of spending power, for not much more ($30-$50) you can grab a RTX 2070 SUPER with the following benefits in mind:

  • 10% increase in performance (the better card by default)

  • lesser power demand for added efficiency

  • Better overclocking margins for some added performance

  • Better optimisation at the code level as AMD cards continue to see problems with a number of gaming titles

  • Ray tracing and DLS (whether it's widely available or not - a bonus)

The only reason you might want to consider the RX-series is if your display supports FREESYNC (or if you simply prefer AMD by way of patronage). A number of freesync panels are also now supporting GSYNC with Nvidia's existing driver patches. Granted another reason to adopt the AMD option is "value" but I don't believe that's your primary goal here considering you can save money in a number of areas:

  • NVME SSD for a respectable Sabrent Rocket $109 or even a 660p for $95. For gaming and general use, in real-world applications the SX8200 isn't going to make any difference in performance (at all).

  • A 650W PSU for under $100 is more than sufficient with plenty of headroom in the tank for future upgrades.

  • If you're not targeting RAW overclocking endeavours (not necessary on 3000-series CPUs) and WIFI 6 isn't of concern, a decent X570 motherboard is achievable for under $200

  • You could even stick with the CPUs stock cooler which is pretty decent (although, granted I would also prefer a quieter aftermarket solution)

RTX 2070 SUPER OPTION: $500: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/3sJmP6/nvidia-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-video-card-900-1g180-2515-000 or a partner card for some added dosh.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thoughts on my part list for my 1st gaming Build."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

GPU

The 1080 ti is massively overpriced (retailed around $700 prior) and its a previous GEN card, surpassed by Nvidias newer 2080 SUPER for $700-$750.

If you want the best currently available, the RTX 2080 TI ($1100-$1200) dominates the 1080 ti by a 30% performance margin and will you see you comfortably shooting past 60fps @ 4K (demanding titles + top settings). If you're yet to purchase a display for gaming, for higher FPS, or a more balanced quality and performance panel, I would look for a 1440p higher refresh rate panel (144hz). Best of both worlds. Or possibly a 1440p "ultra widescreen". Here's how the ultra wide screen compares with 4K: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQ0a0eAPT7s&t=444s

Keep in mind, the RTX 2080 TI is relatively overpriced being Nvidia champions the higher end gaming market with no competition in sight.


CPU

For "strictly gaming" and higher resolution gaming displays, the i9-9900K isn't necessary at all. Hi res gaming is more GPU bound, hence even a more affordable Ryzen 3700X will deliver comparable performance. The only reason you might the K-series path is if you fancy overclocking. Won't make much difference in gaming performance but does have it's benefits in the long run. For gaming only + OC, you don't need the hyperthreaded i9 option, the i7-9700K will deliver at the an equal footing.


RAM

You definitely need 32GIGS. 16GB, and that too in a dual-kit configuration (2x8GB) for best performance.

etc etc

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The final thought"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

AMENDED OPENING POST (Just added a couple of spaces to release the links, and being a perfectionist, some breathing space :))

This is what I have come up with Seen yesterday

  1. AMD https://pcpartpicker.com/list/fyrznH

  2. Intel: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/K8cd8Y

I want votes for which one I should build.


It would help to know your purpose of use (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

Assuming its gaming, a Ryzen 3600 is your best bet. Only 4% short of the i5's performance, but throws in multi-threaded support, a decent cooler and excellent value @ $195. The 3600X sees very small performance uplift, lesser than the i5 and the $45 premium is pointless.

If overclocking is of absolute interest, the i5 paired with a beefier $45/$55 cooler delivers a more noteworthy advantage at the standard 1080p or lower resolutions.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will it fit?"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

I have the same D15 HSF and RAM kit in our workplace. It's a perfect fit (at a kissing distance). At installation it did feel as if the modules were impeding, but i managed to slip in a business card which comfortably passed through between the cooler fan and the RAM heat-spreader.

For added confidence, you can increase the clearance (height) by simply snapping in the fan a little higher. The flexibility here is great for taller RAM options (providing case clearance permits). The heatsink itself has plenty of clearance hence no concerns there.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "3.5mm mic not working, problem is on pc side"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Windows fully updated?

tried downloading audio driver from the motherboard manufacturers support page?

As long as your SOUND configurations are set correctly/enabled in Windows, this may be a problem on the Mobo code-level. Check the motherboard manufacturers support page, under BIOS updates for any notes in reference to "audio fix", etc. I've had a similar issue with an older B350 AMD board (a longggg time back) which was fixed with a BIOS update (not everyones cup of tea, but a valid last resort should all else fail)

Have you tried searching "motherboard make and model mic not working" in google or something. A hardware problem usually sees similar queries from other users and fingers crossed a fix in sight.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

excellent -with the 'i' out of pic and a '0' dropped in front of the eighty, you've got yourself a solid well-balanced 1080p gamer:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $145.64 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI B450M BAZOOKA V2 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $82.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $72.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $94.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $279.99 @ Amazon
Case Fractal Design Focus G Mini MicroATX Mini Tower Case $54.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $801.58
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-14 19:17 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "X264 vs Nvenc(New) for Streaming"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

3700X x264 offers greater flexibility and delivers the best image quality. Compromise being, some games (more-so) in the long run may more effectively utilise all 8 cores (and multi-threaded support too), hence x264 can impact FPS performance on the gaming side. Not a big issue if you ask me, 6-core game utilisation isn't going anywhere anytime soon - plenty of power in the tank!!

NVENC more efficient and doesn't scale well with higher quality configurations or resolutions. For most users, the basic profiles @ 1080p are just simply good enough by today's standards (youtube/twitch/etc) hence makes for an excellent alternative.


Personally, i'd grab a Ryzen 3900X (12 core/24 thread) and in a budget constrained environment, opt for a lesser expensive GPU unless display resolutions/quality configurations demand otherwise. You can't beat x264 encoding with a 3900X - It's a beast of a chip with a very bright future. Higher quality encoding practices or higher resolution output whilst maintaining higher FPS would be a walk in the park. Again if you're targeting basic 1080p presets, the 3700X/NVENCs got you covered.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "A Cpu For Streaming"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

A second/3rd GEN Ryzen 8-core multi-threaded CPU will do the job very nicely. There's plenty of options to choose from - Ryzen 1700/2700/2700X/3700X (the 3700X being best)

Whether we can secure the best option available depends on what else your $1250 build entails. Does the budget include:

  • Display?

  • Other peripherals? (keyboard, mouse, etc)

  • Operating system needed?

  • Wifi needed?

  • also, is that $1250 in USD currency? or CAD/AUS/etc?


If you fancy sticking with the GPU encoder (pref. RTX card) for basic streams, the 8-core CPU option becomes unnecessary.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Phanteks Evolv X Dual System for Gaming, Streaming and 3D work."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Gaming system unsure on processor. Streaming itx system also unsure on processor.

With faster 8 core CPUs today or the 12 core Ryzen 3900X monstrosity - you don't need a lesser efficient and costly dual-system solution. Although, if you are planning on gaming and streaming whilst working on 3D-design projects (unlikely), it may make sense.

If this is more of an enthusiast approach where cost/efficiency sees no limits and you simply won't have it any other way - go for it! Some build notes:

  • Get the Revolt X series dual-system PSU from Phanteks. Some wattage overkill would be nice! Maybe 1200W.

  • If you want to support a second entry level GPU on the streamer, you'll want to target a longer riser cable for the vertical mount just above the PSU shroud. Keep in mind this arrangement will conceal the RTX 2080 TI. If you want the RTX 2080 TI to enjoy full view through the tempered glass and want to keep the mini ITX ceiling system as the streamer, you'd be looking for 2 riser cables and a second custom vertical mount base.

I'd like to utilise the kraken water cooling for both CPUs.

  • Keep in mind, the front supports up to 360mm rad, the second system will be limited to a 120/140mm single fan AIO (will be enough for stock performance or moderate OC). Check case specs to confirm mounting dimensions.

Gaming system unsure on processor.

  • Ryzewn 3600 (solid performance for gaming)

  • Ryzen 3700X (8-cores future proofing for gaming, 3D modelling)

  • Ryzen 3900X (12 cores if your 3D-design/rendering workloads are optimised for these higher core counts / multi-threaded support). The 3900X would be a better suit for a build designed for streaming hence you could slot one of these in the Mini-ITX ceiling system. Problem being, you'd want to benefit from the gaming GPU's superior performance as the RTX 2080 TI is a rendering masterpiece for this type of workflow.

If overclocking is an absolute:

  • i7-9700K (gaming)

  • i9-9900K (gaming and 3D design)

Streaming itx system also unsure on processor.

  • Ryzen 1600 / 2600 (plenty of power)

  • Ryzen 2700 if you fancy pushing on higher quality output (/resolutions) and want some added juice available for the long run.


For a more hassle-free approach - single system 3900X + 2080 TI. Assuming your 3D project applications richly enjoy NVLINK dual-GPU configurations, you might be better off getting x2 2080 TIs for faster rendering opposed to a dual-system build. Depends on your workload though (or how well your workload scales across 2 cards) The 2080 TI is already a very powerful card hence for most dual-gpu configs are not necessary.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

I’m gonna build a pic but I’m on a budget of 80 bucks

pic for 80 dollars?

or pc for 800 dollars?

...lol (sorry, but you never know)


Assuming it's a PC for $800

  • Do you need any of the following: Windows (OS), display, keyboard, mouse, etc

  • Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/general use/etc)

Comment reply on status45's Completed Build: Amd Ryzen Build - The Night King

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

It'll take too long, just pick up a $4000 powerhouse industrial pressure washer, overclock it to 30L/min and blast the living daylights out of it. A drop of paste, 4 screws down and bobs your uncle (don't forget to plug in the fan)

Comment reply on status45's Completed Build: Amd Ryzen Build - The Night King

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

Cleaner and whiter than my toothbrush +1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming/Streaming Pc"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

12 quid more:

  • Faster single threaded Ryzen 2700X

  • Faster and newer RTX 2060 (includes ray tracing/DLSS)

  • Case matching white RAM - the 'Ballistic Sport' from Crucial supports higher overclocking potential.

  • Better quality PSU

  • 500GB NVME fast SSD. You can always upgrade to more storage later. SSDs are vital for the over-all system performance with modern day faster CPUs. If you can raise the budget by £35 (excellent value) grab a 1TB stick: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor £219.99 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard £106.99 @ Amazon UK
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £75.59 @ Amazon UK
Storage Sabrent Rocket 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £59.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card £326.09 @ Technextday
Case NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case £69.98 @ Box Limited
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £64.97 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £93.99 @ CCL Computers
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor £172.98 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1190.57
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-14 16:52 BST+0100

These additional options are purely optional, by no means necessary:

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What are cable mods for psu"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

2 types,

Extension kits - as the name suggests, to simply extend the existing cables (attached to the original cables).

(Modular) Full kits - to replace the original cables


Reasons you might consider Extension kits:

  • Non-modular PSU's original cables can't be replaced. Or a select number on semi-modular units. Hence extension kits make sense

  • Depending on your build form factor or routing requirements, if you end up with short cables, "extend" them. Although vast majority of cases and build arrangements are perfectly fine with the PSU supplied spaghetti.

  • Although I have a fully modular PSU, since my case glass window only showcases the CPU 8-pin, Mobo 24-pin and GPU 8-pin + 6-pin, I ended up picking up extensions for all of these 4 connects for as little as £32 (well a little more for the custom combs). Hence a cost-effective solution. If you're going for a custom colour scheme or specific sleeved pattern, it will be more costly.

Reasons you might consider FULL modular kit:

  • Self-explanatory really, out with the old and in with the new, with a full coordinated theme in place.

  • If your original cables are of the less-bendable variety, making cable management a nightmare in tighter spots, a softer approach with a full kit makes life a little easier.

  • All-round visual transparency - the aesthetics!

  • Full "ready-made" kits may present better overall value.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "£7000 budget."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

For gaming not so much. Nvidia dropped it's support packages. Some game devs may support it but it's not optimised well enough to reap best benefits from a dual config. As mentioned before, other problems at the driver level or game code can cause a number of issues.

Where dual/multi-GPU configurations continue to see consistent support is "NVLINK" for the server space/workstation class builds, basically a newer SLI bridging link with higher bandwidths. For GPU hard pressed workloads, software developers are better suited to roll out regular patches to keep multi-GPU workflows working at their peak performance - something we were also seeing from the game devs a few years ago - sadly, that's no longer the case. Also keep in mind, if you do end up buying 2 cards for select working titles on SLI, it won't work with DX12, some games continue to see some sort of support at DX11.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New Build Ideas for my old man"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

0AIO liquid cooling for these types of builds is more of a "enthusiast" approach or an aesthetically inclined one. In terms of raw performance, a $50-$90 tower air cooler with a single fan reels in pretty much the same performance. Since overclocking isn't Ryzens best selling point, neither of those options are necessary hence the $35 Cryorig H7 is a sufficient approach.

If overclocking is of interest, i'd go the intel route (preferably an 8 core i7-9700K). It sees a nice uplift in performance at 1080p gaming resolutions. But at 1440p, it's not worth it IMO, as higher resolution gaming is more GPU bound opposed to CPU.

Finding it very hard to distinguish between what I want "an excellent gaming comp with max spend 3000" and "the best you could get for 3000, but not necessarily noticeably so"

There are ways in maximising performance at the full rate of a 3K budget. Assuming you went with the 1440p option (at this point, with your budget I wouldn't look at anything lower), there is the RTX 2080 TI monstrosity. Problem being, it's just a mere 10-15% performance gain for a ridiculous £350-£400 on top asking price. At a time when the 2080 super is already pretty expensive. Ain't worth it, i'd much rather save the retained funds here for a more meaningful upgrade later (assumably a far more significant increase in performance for the expected competitive GPU war we're hoping AMD/others will enforce - well i'm always hopeful)

Before the above has you more to consider, the RTX 2080 SUPER in OPTION 2, is a superb graphics cards for 1440p gaming. Easily capable of picking off 120fps (thats just an average) in demanding games on ultra settings.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need motherboard suggestion for 3600"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

X570s are fully compatible, but a little on the expensive side.

A select number of newer B450s are also compatible out of the box (Ryzen 3000 ready). Not widely available though. Look for MSI B450 "MAX" motherboards. These are currently available in the UK, not sure about the rest of the world (we're just special :P lol)

Third option, a standard B450 MSI (non-MAX variant) which would require a BIOS update. This is achievable without a previous GEN CPU. If you have an older Ryzen chip, any B450 board will do the job.

Where are you based?

Preferred budget for the mobo?

i'm not so sure about the x570 board chip set fan

Nothing to worry about, just a more nippier robust chipset opening up some additional feature-set doors. Needs a little cooling to maintain performance. Either way, if it's just for gaming, i'd prefer some of the more affordable options as mentioned above.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Updated my system to INTEL due to lower local prices"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

8700k vs 9700k?

For just $20 more, definitely the 9700K (8 physical cores).

The 212 EVO is decent and should offer a moderate OC for the time being.

Hope this package secures a Z-series mobo as you'll want to tap into those peaking boost clock speeds + keep yourself open to OCing.

The price is negligible so it comes down to 8 cores or 6/12 with hyperthreading.

8 physical cores is just one aspect......with $60 shaved off the retail asking price, it overclocks at a respectable advantage, throws in integrated GPU support (a worthy backup) and on the outset at stock conditions manages a 7-8% performance uplift - it should be a done deal, 9700K!! One of the areas I struggle with intel options today, with AMD's excellent value proposition overshadowing the alternative, is the added cost involved in cooling solutions. Even at stock conditions, a decent $30+ cooler becomes necessary. A pricier chip with this sort of added expense just transforms bad value to worse value and being you already have a 212 evo on the go + the discounted rate = you simply can't go wrong :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New Build Ideas for my old man"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

You certainly don't need to fork out 3 grand for a solid gaming platform. Both builds below are based on higher refresh rate gaming for that butter smooth gaming experience.

OPTION 1:

1080p 144hz gaming

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £179.68 @ Amazon UK
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler £34.99 @ AWD-IT
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £109.99 @ CCL Computers
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory £91.21 @ More Computers
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £109.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card PowerColor Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB Red Devil Video Card £470.49 @ Scan.co.uk
Case NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case £69.95 @ Box Limited
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £88.98 @ AWD-IT
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £83.00 @ Amazon UK
Monitor AOC C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor £172.98 @ Amazon UK
Mouse Corsair M65 PRO RGB FPS Wired Optical Mouse £34.98 @ Scan.co.uk
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1446.24
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-13 23:39 BST+0100

OPTION 2:

1440p 144Hz larger 27" screen for some more immersive gameplay + sharper image visual quality

  • Superior performing GPU

  • 1440p 144hz Dedicated GSYNC display + IPS for natural colours and better viewing angles (i have this bad boy for my personal gaming rig, FLAWLESS STUFF!)

  • Swapped the case for something allowing improved airflow (case options are a tough one, as there are plenty to choose from. If you have anything in particular in mind, let us know.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £179.68 @ Amazon UK
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler £34.99 @ AWD-IT
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £109.99 @ CCL Computers
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory £91.21 @ More Computers
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £109.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card £739.99 @ Amazon UK
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case £79.99 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £88.98 @ AWD-IT
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £83.00 @ Amazon UK
Monitor Acer XB271HU bmiprz 27.0" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor £588.99 @ PC World Business
Mouse Corsair M65 PRO RGB FPS Wired Optical Mouse £34.98 @ Scan.co.uk
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £2141.79
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-13 23:45 BST+0100

Which ever option you go for, there's plenty of savings here for some added possibilities. Eg.

  • More storage. Maybe a 2TB nvme ssd (if needed for the long run)

  • RGB element (if desired)

  • A 3700X overkill (8 physical cores). Might be handy in the long run, although I'm pretty confident a 6-core multi-threaded 3600 is more than enough for several years to come.

  • Integrated WIFI (if needed). An ethernet connection is always best if the connect is convenient.

  • Depending on what you already have, maybe a tactile mechanical keyboard / headset / etc.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will a Asus PRIME B360M-A Micro ATX work with an i5 9400f?"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

The BIOS update would require a previous GEN CPU. It's more hassle than it's worth.

There are a handful of B365's available: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#c=136&sort=price&page=1

Or, search Amazon/Newegg (or online retailers) as some options may not be listed on PCPP.

Zerk2012's already got you covered with a micro-ATX option (assuming thats what you're after). If the case can mount a standard-ATX mobo, there's also this option: https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813157866?Item=N82E16813157866&nm_mc=AFC-RAN-COM&cm_mmc=AFC-RAN-COM&utm_medium=affiliates&utm_source=afc-PCPartPicker&AFFID=2558510&AFFNAME=PCPartPicker&ACRID=1&ASID=https%3a%2f%2fpcpartpicker.com%2fproduct%2fWQJtt6%2fasrock-b365-phantom-gaming-4-atx-lga1151-motherboard-b365-phantom-gaming-4&ranMID=44583&ranEAID=2558510&ranSiteID=8BacdVP0GFs-ty_ee5PHGlsvGs110bj2VQ

Comment reply on Forum Topic "NZXT Kraken X72 or Corsair H150i Pro"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Both are great!

The X72, subjectively speaking, has a nice ring RGB element that kinda stands out (if that's your thing)

For the more noise sensitive buyer, the H150i employs more premium fans with a lesser audible range.

I'm more leaning towards the H150i which was a later addition, prior to my Kraken purchase in the 280mm ranks. The krakens fans ramp up a little too loud for my personal liking, ended up swapping them out for some quieter ones. Hence if you prefer the ringed RGB element, you can always swap the fans later.

but now I kinda wanna downgrade a little to save some money

[OPTIONAL] For more savings, a chunky premium heatsink with a single fan for $90 does the job just as good with the benefit of longer durability and actually overall quieter (eliminating the pump noise too): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/F3gzK8/be-quiet-dark-rock-pro-4-505-cfm-cpu-cooler-bk022

Comment reply on Forum Topic "£2.5k High End PC list needed"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

PC JESUS lol .....but short on miracles. Actually more of a messenger boy with wall-text invasive fire power (i

The intel advantage is more reflective @ 1080p gaming. A tad faster single threaded cores do see some desirable performance gains at these (or lower) resolutions. Since you're targeting a 1440p sharper detailed resolution, those performance gains pretty much disappear. The performance lackey here being the GPU!

If you want to keep your options open with CPU encoding (streaming) in the mix, the 9700K pretty much eliminates itself. You'll want the i9-9900K which enables multi-threaded support. If overclocking is hand-in-hand with the build requirement, the intel i9 CPU scales very nicely with some manually tweaked overclocking. This would also make a more meaningful fit for the 360mm AIO. In my personal opinion, the 9900K isn't worth the added spend with 1440p gaming in mind, the performance advantages at higher resolutions are too small in measure of the asking price. But that doesn't discount the OC enthusiasm or a generally faster single threaded chip. The dilemma being, at a similar cost, the 12 core 3900X delivers more tangible gains for "gaming and streaming possibilities/future proofing with higher stream quality/higher resolution versatility".

I guess it's down to personal preference:

  • 9900K - Overclocking in full swing + 5-7% faster single threaded performance + integrated GPU (could come handy when troubleshooting GPUs)

  • 3700X - narrowly trailing behind the 9900K but offers excellent value + practically the same game performance @ 1440p but doesn't offer much overclocking headroom

  • 3900X - Similar game performance as the 3700X/9900K (negligible difference), but delivers up-to 45-50% greater multi-threaded compute performance for a solid streaming solution with ample headroom for the long run

It's down to user preference.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel or AMD"

  • 8 months ago
  • 4 points

From an overall performance perspective, the Ryzen 3600 stands taller here.

The only reason you might want to consider going the intel route (9600K - absent of multi-threaded support), is if you're planning on overclocking. Otherwise the 3600 is stella!

If you're targeting higher resolution gaming (1440p/etc) go with the cheapest solution (if you want to save money) as performance disparity at this range is negligible.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "£7000 budget."

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

2× 2080ti in SLI is my only must.

Thats where the problem is. SLI isn't seeing any support from NVIDIA since the 1000-series GPUs and game devs are responding equally by negating the possibility (AMD too). Only a select number of titles may run with some performance advantages but most likely you'll run into driver issues, games failing to load, lower yield from the dual config, BSODs, etc etc. There are some abstraction layers flying about to bridge the gap but these are seeing slow support or fail miserably. Unless you are familiar with specific games successfully achieving some level of gains via SLI (although long term support is not guaranteed), i'd drop it all-together.

A 3900X CPU + a single 2080 TI makes for a good combo with an earlier upgrade path should newer graphics cards (down the line) offer substantial performance advantages. I'm just curious, what type of display resolution are you targeting? For most configurations with higher refresh rate offerings (1080p/1440p/1440p ultra widescreen) a single 2080 TI will offer excellent performance at the best of gaming presets. Even at 4K, top settings, plenty of juice in the tank to comfortably shoot past 60fps.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "£2.5k High End PC list needed"

  • 8 months ago
  • 3 points
  • MEMORY - Granted, 4 sticks look nice with the RGB element but 2 sticks amounting to 32GB will run more efficiently, consistently, lesser latency and higher bandwidths. This is down to the motherboard/chipset memory configuration. Current consumer level mobos use "dual" memory controllers which are designed to get the best bandwidth possible across a 2-dimm slot arrangement. This also helps with auto/manual speeds or tighter timing overclocks to get the best performance out of your kit. Since Ryzen CPU's hinge on superior RAM performance, something like this would be highly recommended (keeping the RGB element in check): https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/NyTPxr/corsair-vengeance-rgb-pro-32gb-2-x-16gb-ddr4-3200-memory-cmw32gx4m2c3200c16

  • CPU - the 3800X isn't worth it. Offers a very tiny increase in performance (1-2%) which won't have any noticeable effect in hi-res gaming. A more deserving upgrade from the 3700X, although not necessary, is the 3900X (12 core/16 thread CPU). Keep in mind, the Ryzen 3600 competes at an equal footing with all of these higher core count options when observing only game performance (literally the same). Where the 3700X/3900X make absolute sense is the added cores/threaded support for encoding (streaming). The 3900X delivers up to 45-50% greater encoding/rendering power over the 3700X hence an absolute "BOSS" for taking streaming to the next level (higher resolution or higher quality streams or the best future proof option for multi-threaded simultaneous workloads).

  • COOLER - I'm assuming this is purely based on aesthetics. A 360mm RAD compares negligibly opposed to a $50/$80 air cooler. Since Ryzen CPU's don't offer much headroom for overclocking, and where possible, the CPU demands way more voltage-override, you're mostly better off activating the in-house automated PBO setting which will work great with either the $50/$150 cooling options. This ones entirely up to you, as some are more than happy to add to the build with some AIO eye candy (...and there's absolutely nothing wrong with that).

  • SSD - the 970 evo is a better fit for enterprise level build workstations, or more accurately specific workloads which by design are capable of utilising these faster sequential read or write speeds. A performance gaming build or a vast number of other professional workloads (and general use), sees next to zero benefit with this level of performance superiority. To simplify, in real-world noticeable speeds you're simply not going to see any performance increase. Since NVME SSDs are highly desirable, to fill this void, manufacturers threw in a bunch of consumer-level options which cost far less. Yet even these consumer branched NVMEs are too fast for most use-case scenarios with next to zero performance advantages over traditional 2.5" SATA SSDs. Unfortunately I see plenty of people viewing benchmarks to determine best performance but these benchmarks are ill-advised if the viewer is not familiar with the type of workloads being measured. You could put the £177 to much better use by adding another 15 quid and grabbing a fast 2TB NVME 660p: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/7MQG3C/intel-660p-series-2tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw020t8x1 I have several of these 660Ps (gaming, work builds, etc) as well as the higher grade enterprise level 960s and 970s for my workstation class builds (virtualisation, scratch disks and a couple of other higher IOPs demands) .....and for gaming and general use, the comparison offers ZERO DIFFERENCE IN PERFORMANCE! (don't let the buzz-lightyears tell you otherwise)

  • If you prefer a 750W PSU - for a quieter running unit: a few options. Although i'm a big fan of Seasonic (king of the hill), but the Corsair option below does offer a softer (easily bendable) approach with the cables for easier cable management. Haven't tried the BitFenix one yet, but it's seeing plenty of positive reviews from the hard-stress techie test-beds of PSU zealots.

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/64cMnQ/seasonic-focus-plus-gold-750w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-ssr-750fx

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/wmJkcf/bitfenix-whisper-m-750w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-bp-wg750umag-7fm

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/79tQzy/corsair-rmx-2018-750w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020179-na

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen 5 2600 SFF Gaming Build"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

For a mini-ATX, this aught to do it! (correction: mini-ITX)


[OPTION 2]

If you're open to a budget Micro-ATX case with tempered glass, there are some pretty nifty performance spikes for a more long term 1080p 60fps+ solution (800 quid worth). A couple of the mentioned games are GPU hungry and will lose some of that 60fps consistency with top in-game configurations. Hence if its of interest, the following does offer over-all better performance:

  • Ryzen 3600 - 15-20% faster compared to the 2600

  • GTX 1660 TI - 25-35% faster compared to the 1660

  • Seasonic is fantastic, but this older mediocre model (mediocrity at the time of release too) is best now served as an entry level unit. The Seasonic Gold series is where real magic happens, some of the best options available. Although for your type of build a Corsair TXM delivers equally valuable quality/performance/etc.

  • Ballistic Sport RAM from crucial with tighter timings (15 CL). These e-die sticks easily overclock to higher frequencies (as much as 3600Mhz). For £72 it's a steal for Ryzen higher bandwidth demands.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £179.68 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI B450M MORTAR MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £95.99 @ Box Limited
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory £72.26 @ CCL Computers
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £97.97 @ CCL Computers
Video Card MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card £270.43 @ Box Limited
Case Deepcool MATREXX 30 MicroATX Mini Tower Case £30.46 @ Scan.co.uk
Power Supply Corsair CXM (2015) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply £52.99 @ AWD-IT
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £799.78
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-13 17:07 BST+0100

I wouldn't be so concerned about the cooling situation here. Both the 3600 and 1660 TI are lower power demanding efficient parts. The 3600 CPU comes with a pretty decent stock cooler, allowing the chip to measure up to it's boost clock potential. Although it's a little louder but something you can always upgrade later with very little effort.

A second 120/140mm case fan would have been nice (again a later upgrade path), but the single rear exhaust fan will get the job done just fine with respectable thermals across the board and "well-within" the safety net.

Although a 450W PSU is more than sufficient for this build, with some added headroom for upgrades, a 550W unit may serve as the better upgrade path for more exhaustive power-hungry upgrades. This is achievable for £12 more: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/dDH48d/corsair-txm-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020133-na

EDIT: If you fancy the CUBED box for the case, there's one in the Micro-ATX form too but will cut you back by 20 quid: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/QMp323/thermaltake-case-ca1d500s1wn00

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1400 USD HTPC decent airflow build"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Perfect!

BTW, if you're supporting a FreeSync panel (which isn't GSYNC compatible) and fancy saving some money $60/$70 (for around 6-8% drop in performance), there is the RX 5700 XT. Only problem being, some of the beefier aftermarket AIB options with improved cooling solutions and factory-OC are either out of stock or yet to hit the shelves. A little more on the 5000-series AMD cards: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHvGZPb2hDY

The 2070 Super is the better card in terms of performance but not by a significant amount and for 1080p 144hz gaming, either of these options are fantastic!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New build for a friend"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

I was sooo tempted to remove that case for something a little more affordable. But I have to admit, i've never seen this one before and its the baddest-aasss thing i've come across since the year 1019 BC. I tend to stay away from ASUS merch with it's brand-driven heftier price tags but I guess sometimes aesthetics really do add value for a classy finished product.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $310.00 @ Shopping Express
Motherboard ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $249.00 @ Shopping Express
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $132.00 @ Skycomp Technology
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB GAMING X Video Card $705.00 @ Skycomp Technology
Case Asus TUF Gaming GT501 ATX Mid Tower Case $249.00
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $149.00 @ PCCaseGear
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1794.00
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-13 10:00 AEST+1000

If he's planning on a higher refresh rate 144hz panel, or higher res gaming (1440p+), the RTX 2070 Super is achievable within the budget range (i hope)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New build for a friend"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

The parts list is locked. Pop into your saved parts lists, hit "edit details" and on the left remove the tick @ "private"

Also you'll want to check with your friend whether he has an SSD (storage). For the boot drive/applications, it's a necessary function to get the best performance out of the system.

A little more info would help in defining his purpose of use. Is he gaming too? maybe streaming? or other workloads which may demand/benefit from a higher-end GPU or a higher core count CPU?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1400 USD HTPC decent airflow build"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Not the smallest of HTPCs but provides excellent airflow and runs as quiet as a baby with the right cooling solution (the GPU is another story, although this one maintains a very respectable acoustic range compared to some of the competition).

The CPU cooler does not bundle in a AM4 bracket for the mount. You can order one for free from Noctua: https://noctua.at/en/nm-am4-mounting-kit

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.79 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-U9DXi4 37.8 CFM CPU Cooler $61.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte X570 GAMING X ATX AM4 Motherboard $169.99 @ Newegg
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $79.99 @ Amazon
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $109.98 @ Amazon
Video Card NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB Video Card $499.99 @ Best Buy
Case Silverstone GD10B HTPC Case $133.58 @ Amazon
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan Noctua NF-R8 redux-1800 PWM 31.37 CFM 80 mm Fan $9.95 @ Amazon
Case Fan Noctua NF-R8 redux-1800 PWM 31.37 CFM 80 mm Fan $9.95 @ Amazon
Case Fan Noctua NF-P12 redux-1300 PWM 54.32 CFM 120 mm Fan $13.90 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1384.10
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 19:34 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC solely for photo editing with Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop $950"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

RobertL90 already presents an excellent option. If you settle with a budget case and Micro form factor, this leaves you little extra cash to throw towards a larger 1TB NVME SSD. I tend to keep all my "active workload" DSLR libraries on the faster SSD, opposed to secondary slower storage. Makes sorting images so much faster and more responsive (esp. 4K) when loading/saving bulk files.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £185.58 @ Aria PC
Motherboard MSI B450M MORTAR MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £95.99 @ Box Limited
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £75.59 @ Amazon UK
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £109.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 570 4 GB PULSE Video Card £129.89 @ Overclockers.co.uk
Case Deepcool MATREXX 30 MicroATX Mini Tower Case £30.46 @ Scan.co.uk
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £75.46 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £702.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 23:39 BST+0100

This leaves you 50 quid in the sack, maybe a secondary archive/backup 2TB Hard drive? https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/kq7v6h/toshiba-p300-2tb-35-7200rpm-internal-hard-drive-hdwd120uzsva

Or a beefier aftermarket cooler for a quieter running system: https://www.cclonline.com/product/225934/CR-H7A/CPU-Coolers/Cryorig-H7-Single-Tower-Heatsink-with-120mm-Fan/CLR1378/?siteID=8BacdVP0GFs-iVV6dWIgyoxYQ6skHwInig (AM4 bracket included)

The RX 570 is more than enough in it's performance class. Although, if you are using photoshop for hi-res "GPU-based rendering" or (other CUDA core well-optimised applications), a "used" GTX 1060 for around £100-£150, or more preferably (if affordable) a newer and faster GTX 1660 would do you better service. Does push the budget to £780.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor £185.58 @ Aria PC
Motherboard MSI B450M MORTAR MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £95.99 @ Box Limited
Memory Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory £75.59 @ Amazon UK
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £109.99 @ Amazon UK
Video Card Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card £209.99 @ Amazon UK
Case Deepcool MATREXX 30 MicroATX Mini Tower Case £30.46 @ Scan.co.uk
Power Supply SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £75.46 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £783.06
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-12 23:43 BST+0100

EDIT: You can save a tenner if you drop down to a very respectable semi-modular PSU: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/dDH48d/corsair-txm-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020133-na for either of the above options. Fully modular is not necessary.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1400 USD HTPC decent airflow build"

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

Purpose of use?

Assuming its gaming, will you be streaming too?

EDIT: Also, if gaming, what display resolution are you carrying (1080p/1440p/etc) and refresh rate (60hz/144hz/etc)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "4k gameing pc setup"

  • 8 months ago
  • 2 points

max amount of money i want to use is low $1000 to high end $10000

Crikies, i haven't seen this big of a leeway between a minimum and max spend. For a minute I thought my eyes were malfunctioning or something.

want to 2way sli in nv link 2 2080ti cards

You'd be better off with a single RTX 2080 TI. SLI/NVL/CF is just not seeing the support we should be seeing for workable dual/multi-GPU configurations. In more ways then one, it's fair to say SLI is dead (for now).

need help upgradeing my pc want to play all my games in 4k max settings

Is there a currently owned build list which requires sprucing up or are you building new?

Peripherals included? (display/keyboard/mouse/headset/etc etc)

If you're looking for higher game performance (fps) alongside higher resolutions, the balance here is better achieved via ultrawide 1440p panels. Regardless of budget, 4K will always present limitations in performance (maxed out game presets) and in my personal opinion it's a little over-rated. A quick review of the the 2 options before you pull the trigger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQ0a0eAPT7s

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