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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "newbie help"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Anywhere between 2933-3200Mhz and you're good to go! I would go with the cheapest respectable option available, as long as cas latency is set around 15-16CL. In terms of value, 3000Mhz would be the best way to go about it.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking to build my first gaming PC | ~$2000 Budget"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $259.99 @ Walmart
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $31.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - Z390 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $158.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $77.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB VENTUS Video Card $694.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.17 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $84.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Monitor VIOTEK - GN27D 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $329.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1937.87
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-03 09:43 EDT-0400

There are many case options to choose from. The H500 is a nice placeholder for a compact minimalist build with sufficient airflow, a premium feel and a clean finish with a PSU shroud and excellent cable management.

Comment reply on atomicdeathray's Completed Build: Duster - My 10 year old build with a makeover and "RGB"

  • 6 months ago
  • 3 points

love the attitude! A right RGB mash-up!

Comment reply on sourcekappie's Completed Build: i3 8100 E-Sports PC

  • 6 months ago
  • 3 points

CS:GO x2

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$2200 Gaming PC"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Not sure why the above posters are focusing on the i9-9900K. It would make sense if you are planning on streaming alongside gaming. If not, the i7-9700K is simply "more than enough" with 8 physical cores and single threaded clock frequencies which sit at an equal footing with the i9.

Like the others, I too would recommend ditching the smaller capacity NVME. The 970 from Samsung is a better fit for an enterprise-level workstation, where superior sequential speeds offered can be put into practice for specific read/write workflows. For a gaming or general-compute rig, those supreme read/write speeds will have next to zero impact on performance. You'd be better off taking something like this with plenty of capacity to store games on (which benefit games with faster load times): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

Or you could ditch the secondary hard drive storage solution and opt for single a 2TB SSD for only $40-$50 more: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/7MQG3C/intel-660p-series-2tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw020t8x1

I'm just curious - are you pairing up a higher res display with the RTX 2080? This beast of a card works really well with 1440p resolutions, and is a little overkill if sticking with 1080p

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best upgrade for each part based on my current build"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

If your purpose of use is based around gaming or other 6-core+HT plenty tasks, you already have a top-notch system! Whether you can do better depends on your workflow. A little more info would help.

Was thinking about upgrading coolers and buffing up my storage and ram.

  • Coolers: If overclocking, there are some premium offerings available or even sizing up to some flashy AIOs if that tickles your fancy. If not overclocking, the H7 is "more than sufficient" and anything better at this point won't offer any additional performance on top. The H7 is also great for some light/moderate overclocking.

  • STORAGE: (EDIT) I see the SSD. If you need more storage, get more storage.

  • RAM: 16GB is generally more than enough for all the day-to-day, gaming, streaming, etc. Anything more would only benefit if your specific use-case can utilise past 16 gigs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "BIG PC Build"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $489.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Thermalright - Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - Z390 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $158.98 @ Newegg Business
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $184.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP - EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $144.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Newegg Business
Video Card Asus - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card $789.99 @ Amazon
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case $94.99 @ Walmart
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $99.00 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Monitor Acer - XB271HU bmiprz 27.0" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor $599.99 @ B&H
Monitor HP - VH240a 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $109.99 @ Amazon
Monitor HP - VH240a 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $109.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3007.78
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-29 14:04 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First gaming pc build - ITX doubts"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

You should be absolutely fine going with the mini H200.

"Safe Limits" on load - ideally 70-75c would be sweet. Around 80c is what I would regard as "safe". If you end up hitting above 88/90c, the GPU will downclock to aid and assist those preferably thermal markings.

A couple of recommendations:

  • to push hot air out of the case, a 2x2 case fan configuration is recommended. 2 fans on the front to pull in cooler air (intakes), 2 on the rear and top (as exhaust).

  • If you can fit one in, try picking up a 3-fan cooled lengthier heatsink GPU. Lesser noise levels and better cooling. Although this is not always true as HSF (heatsink-&-fan) quality/performance varies.

If you have put together a list, do you mind sharing it here? Also whats your budget?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Great Editing/Gaming/Developer Build?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

For a gaming and video editing build, the i9-9900K speaks volumes for both gaming and editing/rendering performance. The i9's vastly superior single core clock speeds and lower latency multi-core up-keeps, outperforms the 1920X's delivery accomplishments. The elephant in the room being: the asking price!

Speaking of cost. Any particular reason why you are opting for a x2 GPU setup? For gaming it's meaningless at the moment or are you targeting more GPU-savvy specific workloads where video render sees greater benefit (esp. memory pooling)?

For a gaming setup, with an RTX 2080, depending on your budget - maybe a 1440p higher refresh rate display? 1080p 60hz doesn't even come close to utilising the GPU's max performance offerings. The 2080 is capable of far greater quality-driven gaming opportunities with a sharper image 1440p screen, 144hz panel (capable of hitting way above 60fps for smoother detailing/gameplay, etc). If you need 2 displays, maybe target one higher resolution panel for gaming and the other a standard 1080p 60hz, to get the best out of your hardware.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First gaming pc build - ITX doubts"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

I assume that heat issues is something I will have to think about. But if cooling is done right what does heat issues mean? Is it just a temperature higher than what is expected in an ATX build or are we talking something that can affect gaming sessions or even damage hardware?

As long as you have moderately decent airflow, a suitable CPU cooler and respectable parts delivering safe-worthy cooling solutions (i.e. GPU, mobo VRMs and adequate power phased motherboards depending on CPU-type/overclocking) you've got nothing to worry about. Most if not all lesser quality driven parts from respectable manufacturers will already have pre-configured limitations to avoid reaching the thermal red-zone so again not of concern.

"heat issues" - this is more of a concern with users aiming to overclock their CPUs/GPUs for some added performance. If you are planning on OCing, most likely you'll be wanting to opt for a more premium CPU cooler, a higher-tier motherboard (or a very decent mid-tier platform) and preferably employing a more airflow aggressive hardware configuration for best results and long-term durability.

And speaking of heat issues and cooling. What differences can I expect with this build in the AIO vs. air cooling debate?

Most common $100+ 240/280mm AIO rads are at an equal footing with $70-$90 premium air coolers, concerning performance/thermals. Air coolers are simply far more durable, reliable and present the lesser "concern" factor going forward. AIOs performance is known to degrade over time until it's simply not effective enough and warrants a change but regardless, some are willing to pay the added premium for the "aesthetics".

Note: If not overclocking, a $30-$40 aftermarket air cooler will suffice! The above is more OC-focused / or an overkill enthusiast must-have (i.e. AIOs).

Is the unlocked cpu unnecissary since my ITX-decission will propably keep me from experimenting too much (or maybe at all) with overclocking. And if so, what cpu would keep cool and deliver high performance?

Unlocked CPUs, whether overclocking or not, deliver higher baseclocks and far greater turbo clockspeeds at default - hence, if the budget allows, stick with an i5-9600K, or alternatively consider the Ryzen 2600X (not much difference with higher resolution gaming).

Is there something else I am missing?

Mini-ITX towers can be a little constrained for GPU breathing space. With a higher-end RTX 2080, have you considered a Micro-ATX case (maybe the H400 from NZXT)? Or are the allocated dimensions for a mini an absolute requirement? Don't get me wrong, the mini-config with the H200i will work fine but most likely with a marginally increased thermal reading on the GPU (within safe limits).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Preview the upcoming responsive layout at Cycling Builder"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Thought i'd allow 24-48 hours before commenting. First impressions weren't great as the previous version was AWESOME! Or not, maybe just a dose of matured familiarity. As with most things new it takes a little warm-up time for some comfy - i'm getting there! I don't see much issue with object/text enlargement on my 1440p res daily driver but I can see what others are referring to when running the same on 1080p.

  • font size in comment/reply fields could be a tad smaller

  • not a fan of the grid lines in threads which envelope follow-up comments/replies.

  • exported part lists in threads could be more kinder to the eye, maybe some greater resemblance to the previous colour scheme. The funny thing is, i can't even recall the comparison but just like higher refresh rate GSYNC, perceptive disparity manifests.

Kudos for mobile responsiveness. Although i'm a desktop jock, it's nice to see a more reassuring portable version of the site - something that will definitely see better use from me. Tried it out on both my 10" tablet + mobile - looks great!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this good?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

No SSD? Or have one already for the boot drive?

Whats the build for? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

Personally i'd drop the aftermarket AIO cooler and grab myself a Ryzen 2600X which comes with a pretty decent stock cooler, some added core-2-core performance, higher turbo clock ceiling + i'd secure a better power-draw driven motherboard. A good quality motherboard capable of more aggressive power resilience also opens up doors for AMD's next generation of CPUs which will be compatible with the same AM4 platform.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Video Editing Build - i7-9700k. Will this GPU work well with this build?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

You're $80 away from securing an i9-9900K with hyperthreading enabled. HT = 2/2.5 additional core performance (virtual), in other words 30%+ more processing power for nippier rendering. It's definitely achievable within the current budget with a little play on mobo+storage selection.

GPU looks good! Whether something like a GTX 1660 or even an older variant 1060 (for hopefully less) will suffice depends on your GPU workload requirements. If gaming too, for 1080p resolutions, the GTX 1660/1660 ti is a real treat and capable of handling any modern day beefed up title.

eg.

(note: a newer PSU is highly recommended as B3 is past it's play-time. Greater power efficiency, improved protection features, longer lasting durability + new capacitors. The i9 demands it...hence added! Cheaper options are available around the $50 mark with non-modularity but since you've already had a taste of going modular, had to include Full-Mod)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $489.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - MasterLiquid ML240L RGB 66.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler Purchased For $0.00
Motherboard MSI - MPG Z390 GAMING PRO CARBON ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $188.91 @ OutletPC
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $174.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $134.99 @ Newegg
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $279.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master - MasterCase H500P Mesh White ATX Mid Tower Case Purchased For $0.00
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $84.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.49 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1453.35
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-26 14:29 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Beginner looking for advice and opinions"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

For a more hands-on review of the parts selection, what is your purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

CASE:

I believe you're referring to this case: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/JwVBD3/corsair-case-cc9011075ww Are you open to other case suggestions with a more attractive aesthetics front? The plastic window and somewhat lower standards in build quality on this one is surpassed with alternative newer offerings for possibly $10 on top. Other reasons to avoid this one: No PSU shroud if you prefer a clean finish and those internal walled up drive bays are a hindrance to maximising airflow throughout the case.

There are several newer case options to choose from, although the following 2 within a similar price band take my personal preference:

With expand-ability in mind: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/w766Mp/phanteks-eclipse-p350x-atx-mid-tower-case-ph-ec350ptg_dbk

Or a minimalist compact endeavour: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/p8x2FT/nzxt-h500-black-atx-mid-tower-case-ca-h500b-b1

GPU:

Besides general suggestions, we would like to know what exactly are the difference between different variants of the rtx 2070?

I hope you're planning on securing a higher resolution panel or a 1080p higher refresh rate monitor (144hz) as this is where the RTX 2070 delivers best - unless it's a work-orientated GPU acceleration prerequisite.

For cycling through 2070 variants, to make things easier - your best course of action would be to check user-feedback! At launch it's anyones guess as to how well a card measures up, how well the thermals stack up, noise-levels, factory OC resilience, etc. As most of these cards deliver very similar/same specifications on paper, there are noteworthy factors here for either some added OC'd performance, quality-based cooling solutions (HSF) and longer warranties. The good news is, these cards have been readily available for some time hence plenty of user-feedback available to give us a more constructive analysis. If you're lucky, you may find some dedicated reviews for some of these options which are run through adverse/stressed conditions to see how well the card stacks up in terms of raw performance and thermals.

Before making recommendations, again your purpose of use and if gaming, your display resolution and refresh rate (e.g. 1080p 60hz) would help!

I can also see several other noteworthy discussion points in reference to PSU choice, storage make-up, CPU cooler and possibly OS and mobo. For the time being, mobo and cooler, are you planning on manually overclocking for some added performance?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is this a good upgrade"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Is this a good upgrade

Depends on what you're upgrading from and purpose of use (gaming, streaming, editing, rendering, etc). A little more info would help. For example for gaming only, an i5-9600K / i7-9700K

I agree with the above guys, the display selection seems a little odd. Assuming gaming is priority here, maybe a single ultra widescreen panel? Have you considered a sharper image 1440p display which makes for a nice fit with the RTX 2080 - unless 1080p super-high 240Hz is a competitive requirement which your eyes are more than capable of benefiting from (meaningless for most).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need a little help about CPU"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

If you're targeting a higher resolution gaming platform, the following presents a more lucrative endurance plan (balance) for the 5 year approval. 1440p resolutions are not so much CPU-intense but more GPU-render bound. Hence a little more push on GPU performance at this point puts future-proof versatility back on the map.

  • CPU: Ryzen 2600X

  • GPU: RTX 2060

Since you're content with 60fps or a mix of decent in-game settings, the RTX 2060 would do you great justice. Moreso in current titles as it's capable of maxing out in-game configurations.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor €185.90 @ Mindfactory
Motherboard MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard €94.90 @ Amazon Deutschland
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory €79.99 @ Amazon Deutschland
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive €69.90 @ Amazon Deutschland
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING AMP Video Card €366.61 @ Mindfactory
Case Corsair - 200R ATX Mid Tower Case €54.90 @ Amazon Deutschland
Power Supply Corsair - CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply €66.54 @ Amazon Deutschland
Optical Drive Asus - DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer €17.86 @ Amazon Deutschland
Monitor Dell - P2418D 24.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor €217.00 @ Amazon Deutschland
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €1153.60
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-26 01:51 CEST+0200

My main goal is to have a gaming computer that can run any game now,

Just to clarify - the 2600X at this range fits the above requirement flawlessly!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "advice on a gpu less expensive that na rtx2060"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

You'd be surprised there's not much size difference once you open up a 2.5" sata-interface SSD. The PCB make-up and size is pretty much the same.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "advice on a gpu less expensive that na rtx2060"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

With VR in the equation, although the 1660 TI is more than capable, i would look to secure a more future-proof and faster rendering RTX 2060. Not necessary at the mo but with VR demands being higher, the stronger the card the better!!

BTW - i didn't realise you had already purchased the CPU and Mobo. Is that correct?

If you're tight on the budget maybe a consider a non-modular 550W PSU for around 50 bucks: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FdRFf7/corsair-cx-2017-550w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020121-na

For under 10 bucks more, i'd also consider a faster SSD: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/6YtQzy/intel-660p-series-512gb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw512g8xt

H18 case is unavailable, a quick replacement added with excellent airflow.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor Purchased For $219.00
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard Purchased For $59.99
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $78.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $61.37 @ Newegg
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design - Focus G Mini (Black) MicroATX Mini Tower Case $46.23 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $54.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.49 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $969.05
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-25 17:13 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New to PC building, looking for advices on part selection"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're happy around the 800 euro mark:

My personal preference (far more superior graphics card if future proofing matters and a solid performing CPU for any modern day gaming title)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor €189.99 @ Amazon France
Motherboard MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard €109.90 @ Amazon France
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory €96.99 @ Amazon France
Storage Corsair - Force LS 120 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For €0.00
Storage Seagate - Momentus 1 TB 2.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For €0.00
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive €45.98 @ Cdiscount
Video Card Zotac - GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card €246.90 @ LDLC
Case Cooler Master - K380 ATX Mid Tower Case €52.50 @ Amazon France
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply €76.91 @ Amazon France
Keyboard Logitech - Keyboard K120 for Business Wired Standard Keyboard Purchased For €0.00
Headphones Plantronics - Gamecom 380 Headset Purchased For €0.00
Other Spirit of Gamer Elite-M5 Purchased
Other Packard Be​ll Viseo 2​30WS Purchased
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €819.17
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-25 22:37 CEST+0200

Or,

If you prefer going the intel route:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor €175.66 @ Amazon France
Motherboard ASRock - B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard €117.90 @ LDLC
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory €96.99 @ Amazon France
Storage Corsair - Force LS 120 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive Purchased For €0.00
Storage Seagate - Momentus 1 TB 2.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For €0.00
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive €45.98 @ Cdiscount
Video Card Zotac - GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card €246.90 @ LDLC
Case Cooler Master - K380 ATX Mid Tower Case €52.50 @ Amazon France
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply €76.91 @ Amazon France
Keyboard Logitech - Keyboard K120 for Business Wired Standard Keyboard Purchased For €0.00
Headphones Plantronics - Gamecom 380 Headset Purchased For €0.00
Other Spirit of Gamer Elite-M5 Purchased
Other Packard Be​ll Viseo 2​30WS Purchased
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €812.84
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-25 22:38 CEST+0200

The intel option deserves a better CPU cooler to avoid performance throttling but not necessary with immediate effect. The stock cooler is ok but you could do better with an aftermarket solution for around 30 euros (quieter, a little more performance).

I would also check the case limitations for adding aftermarket coolers (height clearance)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New to PC building, looking for advices on part selection"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

The RX 570 surpasses the 1050 TI quite significantly

If going intel consider the newer i5-9400F paired with a 100 euro newer ATX B365 motherboard (z-series mobos are a better fit for k-modifier chips)

Or, consider going AMD with a Ryzen 2600X and B450/X470 motherboard (practically the same performance as the above with the added inclusion of multi-threaded support + a more than adequate cooler included + an open upgrade path with next GEN AMD CPUs)

With a more fastidious mobo selection in the bag, I'm sure you can target a slightly better gaming card too (RX 580 or hitting higher with the GTX 1660).

Gaming build? Any other workhorse type of workloads? Streaming maybe?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "advice on a gpu less expensive that na rtx2060"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

As peanut suggests GTX 1660/1660 TI are your best options dropping from a 2060

Is this build just for gaming and the general day-to-day? If yes, i'd look to secure the more game savvy Ryzen 2600X and save yourself 50 bucks! In fact, for a more balanced RIG for your performance targets, help us with the following:

  1. Preferred budget?

  2. Besides gaming, purpose of use? (streaming/rendering/etc)

  3. Display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 60hz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "feedback for my first build?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Yep!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st PC Build - Am I Good to Go???"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Same price!

Since I don't have these cards at hand to form a comparison - can you share your findings as to how both of these units measure up?

One carries a smaller length but chunky heatsink with a single fan and a marginally higher OC (EVGA) and the other a slightly larger heatsink (length-wise) whilst maintaining your typical HS height with 2 more finer static-press fans (MSI). Without being unfavourable of the 2, although keener on the 2-fan quieter RPM solution, i'd be interested to hear your thoughts on how these compare in real-time noteworthy comparisons?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st PC Build - Am I Good to Go???"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

I believe you're missing the point. Opposed to hefty workstation-class 'write' workloads, it's meaningless to stack performance metrics against superior sustainable write speeds or consistent higher volume transfer rates when the end-user is purchasing a build primarily for gaming. The performance disparity here becomes non-existent. The idea here is to achieve relevant superior performance advantages per use-case validation. At the consumer-level, when stacked up against superior performing SATA-interface alternatives, the 660p stands tall like a sore thumb and more importantly intel's target audience is clear from error and respectively very reasonably priced.

The benched review is better allied to enterprise-level use-case scenarios where the end users workload can benefit from nippier write speeds and higher load transfer consistencies. For example, for my write-orientated builds I wouldn't aim anything below a 970 Evo & Co (unless the budget insisted).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st PC Build - Am I Good to Go???"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

...and??

For a 1500+ cuda core driver with power consumption rated @150W, what were you expecting? It's a fantastic gaming card with a large heatsink and deeper chinned fan blades - at this range I wouldn't expect anything better!

As for the SSDs, a more in-depth reasoning would help, considering I own several of these units and they check out flawlessly - both per rated performance and thermals (so-far, consistency too). Please don't compare these parts to premium NVME offerings as it's a gaming rig hence sequential superiority here is meaningless.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can this do 1440p 144hz in Overwatch"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Crikees! I wouldn't be surprised if you can hit 144fps on 4K with the RTX 2080 TI. You certainly don't need that "hugely" overpriced card for 1440p. The RTX 2070/2080 is more than sufficient.

If you are planning to play more demanding games down the road, pick up the RTX 2080.

If you have $3000 to burn, maybe consider an IPS/VA gaming panel with GSYNC

Is it just gaming or are you planning on streaming too?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st PC Build - Am I Good to Go???"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

This puts the 5-year versatility plan at better odds:

Primarily a stronger GPU + faster RAM, which is necessary for AMD Ryzen's optimal performance

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $179.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.68 @ Amazon
Memory ADATA - XPG GAMMIX D10 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $77.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $279.99 @ Newegg
Case Corsair - Carbide Series 275R (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $53.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $871.52
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-23 16:52 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "feedback for my first build?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points
  • 30% greater performance at the GPU-level (basically added mileage for the long run). The GTX 1060 has been surpassed with newer and better Nvidia mid-range gaming cards for LE$$ (EG. GTX 1660/1660 TI or the little pricey RTX 2060 for the higher FPS enthusiast)

  • You don't need an aftermarket cooler, the 2600X is equipped with a pretty decent stock HSF

  • 1TB faster SSD. Since these are remarkably cheaper compared to recent times, the 2-drive solution is no longer necessary. Saving games to SSD = faster game load times or nippier in-game asset management

  • A higher refresh rate VA gaming panel (these are great if you fancy more smoother visual detailing with 60fps+)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $179.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus - ROG STRIX B450-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard $129.99 @ Newegg
Memory Corsair - Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $112.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $279.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG241C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $179.99 @ Newegg
Keyboard Corsair - K55 RGB Wired Gaming Keyboard $49.88 @ Amazon
Mouse Razer - DeathAdder Elite Wired Optical Mouse $44.99 @ Amazon
Headphones Logitech - G430 7.1 Channel Headset $39.97 @ Amazon
Other SteelSeries QcK mass Gaming Mouse Pad - Black $9.88 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1277.54
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-23 16:05 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "my 2060 runs hot"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Things you could try:

Take the glass panel off, or open it if it's hinged up. Run your usual load and see how the temps measure up. If you're seeing a vast improvement, most likely:

  • your case fan orientation for intake/exhaust configuration can do with a swap-over. Basically, air intake from the front and exhaust on top. Every case I have purchased in the last 10 yrs+ (personal gaming rigs only), i tend to try both orientations to see how the thermals measure up. With a front intake, the GPU always ends up benefiting to some degree (at times 1/2c difference which is negligible and other times 3-7c which for me is larger than life)

  • Try mounting the GPU horizontally to avoid confined breathing space when closing in on a flat surface (glass).

  • or, if you fancy things as they are from an aesthetics perspective, you can always download Afterburner and push on those RPM speeds to force some added cooling. This will obviously come at a compromise depending on your audible comfort range.

  • or, simply downvolt (lower power consumption) the GPU's factory OC which will also downclock the clock-frequency (little slower). You can play with the power slider to see where you are with your thermal preference and then compare how much performance was sliced to achieve that target.

Or don't bother doing anything as your current thermal rankings are respectfully "well-within" the safe zone and any improvements at this point are more user-preference based opposed to relieving cause for concern.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC will not turn on at all. No signs of life except from the PSU."

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

(Check your wall socket with a high-watt appliance to see if it’s drawing enough power. Something like a hoover or an electric heater. When troubleshooting, to narrow down the culprit, always avoid extension leads (or surge protection in-betweeners)

  1. Remove all external peripherals and only keep the keyboard, mouse and display connected. Make sure the keyboard and mouse are connected to the standard 2.0 USB ports (black) on the mobo back I/O panel (avoid case front panel ports). Unplug the PSU. Remove the CMOS battery (for 10 mins to be certain). This will clear (reset) BIOS with default system configurations. Put the battery back in and plug in the PSU and try booting.

  2. It's possible the PSUs 5v+ signal isn't being read by the CPUs timer reset controller. Unplug the PSU from the back. Hold down the case power button for a few seconds (10 secs to be certain – not to be exact). This should discharge the power supply units capacitors for a cleanly regulated current flow throughout the mobo. Plug the PSU back in. Make sure the PSU switch is on the "on" position (if available on the PSU unit). Fire up the case power button and see if it boots.

  3. Remove the GPU (for easy accessibility) and Jump-start your mobo without the front panel power connectors connected. It's possible one of the wires connecting to the power button on the case has come loose. Checking this in detail is usually a pain in the backside unless the button installation is easily accessible. Hence it's easier to simply remove both connectors from the mobo front panel (JFP1 marking on the mobo) and shorting the pins using a screw driver or some other conductive metal object. Check mobo manual to identify which two -/+ pwr pins to short. Eg. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ioh3DYLTp4

  4. One/more of your dimm slots may be damaged. Remove your RAM, and only try one stick on each dimm slot at a time. If it doesn’t help, do the same with the second RAM stick (as the first one may be faulty). I know it’s a pain having to shut down, connect and reboot each time but it does help to isolate issues pertaining to memory.

  5. Remove the CPU cooler fan connector and try one of your case fans on the CPU_FAN header. An unlikely fix but worth a shot. Try booting up.

  6. You may at this point consider purchasing a new CMOS battery. Just your standard CR2032 lithium battery available at any local tech store. Replace the previous and give that a shot. (remember to unplug the PSU first)

  7. At this point, if you’re not having any luck with the above – I believe it’s time to disband the build. There’s a chance you might have a grounding issue with the mobo. Remove the mobo from the case and place it on a non-conductive surface. Connect the necessary connections again and give it a shot. If that doesn’t work I would look to remount the CPU and look for any bent pins or other hindrances. Sometimes a simple re-assembly does the trick without identifying the culprit – hence worth a shot before “the faulty mobo” equation arises.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC will not turn on at all. No signs of life except from the PSU."

  • 6 months ago
  • 3 points

Double check all your power connections (esp. CPU 4/8-pin ATX + MOBO 24-pin ATX). It would be a good idea to remove these connectors from the mobo and re-attach them to isolate any bad connects. Check on the PSU side too.

If you're hitting the case power button with zero activity on the mobo, you want to check your front panel power connectors too. These may have slipped off or come loose. Refer to the mobo manual to make sure all front panel connectors are in their correct positions.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2070RTX for 1440p 144Hz?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 3 points

The RTX 2060 is very capable at 1440p even if it's a 6GB VRAM card. Most demanding games, set on higher in-game configurations won't exceed 6GB and those which do won't lose much on-screen visual quality with some fine-tuned in-game configurations. As for the struggles, this is more user performance specific - for example, if you are targeting a higher refresh rate panel (144hz) and absolutely crave hitting those higher fps notes, either a down-tune of in-game settings will suffice or a faster RTX 2070 becomes desirable.

Why you should stick with the RTX 2070:

First of all your budget is fantastic and you're spending quite a bit on "aesthetics", if anything, if it were me I'd secure the best performance available for my budget and then see how much is left over for some flash!

The RTX 2070 is just under 20% faster (more cuda cores) which allows around 15%-18% higher FPS performance. Regardless of FPS, a more powerful card will carry your gaming platform for longer (future-proofing).

The RTX 2070 is equipped with lower latency (faster) VRAM @ 8GB. Although 6GB is sufficient for current games, at 1440p that will quickly change with up and coming demanding games. Hence to maintain visual quality at 1440p in the long run, the RTX 2060 does fall short of favour.


Apologies for over-stepping - but if you fancy a performance driven alternative (a bump in fps) with future-proofing being key to the package, here's an option you might want to consider. I know, the AIO compromise might be a difficult one but i'd opt for an RTX 2080 @ 1440p over aesthetics/RGB any day for the week.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $339.00 @ Mike's Computer Shop
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler $52.26 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $184.00 @ Canada Computers
Memory Corsair - Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $149.99 @ Amazon Canada
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $144.99 @ Canada Computers
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING OC WHITE Video Card $979.99 @ Memory Express
Case NZXT - H500 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $99.99 @ Canada Computers
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $96.80 @ Vuugo
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $128.00 @ Vuugo
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $13.99 @ Amazon Canada
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $13.99 @ Amazon Canada
Monitor Acer - XG270HU 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $449.99 @ Memory Express
Mouse Redragon - COBRA M711 Wired Optical Mouse $29.99 @ Amazon Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2682.98
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-21 14:40 EDT-0400

If it's gaming only, the Ryzen 2600X/AMD platform for higher resolution output pretty much delivers the same for less. Intels nippier core advantages are more reflective on lower resolution gaming platforms hence AMD maintains an excellent value-2-performance alternative + with an upgrade path for next GEN AMD CPU compatibility.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming pc 1300-1400 euro"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

+1 nice build!

OPTIONAL: for 10 euros more - a fully modular PSU with newer capacitors: https://nl.pcpartpicker.com/product/bkp323/seasonic-focus-plus-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-ssr-550fx

Comment reply on Forum Topic "new to pc building need help 800-900$ gaming/editing rig"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Very capable build for those games!!

With the OS included, just a little over budget @ $928. Alternatively you could take a 500GB SSD now and look to add additional storage later if you prefer keeping the cost below $900 or swap the PSU out for a non-modular unit.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $179.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - B450 Gaming Plus ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.68 @ Amazon
Memory GeIL - EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $229.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $64.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.49 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $928.02
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-20 20:15 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "new to pc building need help 800-900$ gaming/editing rig"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

operating system?

Here's a quick placeholder if one isn't needed:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $179.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory GeIL - EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card $279.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $899.83
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-20 19:05 EDT-0400

If your editing demands are more render-orientated, you might fancy an 8-core Ryzen 1700/1700X. For gaming, the 6-core 2600X's nippier clock rate adds a better gaming advantage (marginally)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help with CPU Cooler"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

AMD packs a pretty decent road-warrior cooler with the 2600X, hence no need for an aftermarket solution

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Home Build"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Great just some options if the budget is keen:

A 1TB SSD only costs $30/$40 more. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

If you prefer you can spend an additional $20/$30 for a semi/fully modular PSU. Not necessary, just helps with easier cable management.

With your workload, the 6-core (SMT) Ryzen 2600X is more than adequate faster single threaded speeds (not a huge difference in performance but something to consider). If you're regularly streaming on the constant (home-network) whilst gaming, the 8-core Ryzen 1700 makes sense and adding a decent aftermarket cooler later allows you some very rewarding overclock headroom to match the 2600/2600X.

Totally depending on your budget and game performance targets, there are better cards available in the mid-tier segment for future-proofing (higher visual quality and 60fps performance) - this one would require a push on cost by a 100 bucks with something like the GTX 1660

Regardless of these options, for 700 bucks the above parts list is already very fit-for-purpose with no regrets!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes FreeSync is AMD's adaptive sync protocol. To make use of FreeSync you need an AMD GPU whereas the CPU doesn't matter (intel/AMD)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Going wide screen is definitely worth it if you can afford it, providing you account for the size of the panel against the pixel density to maintain best resolution (or sharper image).

The downer is, a higher pixel-count display means the GPU has to work harder to render the frames hence this can have an effect on FPS performance. Assuming you're going for the RTX 2080 - with a standard 1440p panel you can easily hit up around 120fps in demanding games. With a widescreen 1440p panel you may see a reduction of 30% GPU render performance, hence 80-90fps (average).

As i'm more than happy with gaming performance hanging around 90fps (which is fantastic for higher resolution gaming), i'm actually looking to purchase a curved widescreen 1440p screen sometime this year.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I upgrade the motherboard and/or CPU?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

If I wamt to add more fans, will I need a new MB? I will upgrade the CPU if I need a new MB.

i've never heard that one before. A multiple case fan endeavour, even if it means having to upgrade the mobo and CPU lol

Sorry, just made me smile. I'm sure you're looking for superior performance too :)

TBH, I wouldn't bother with a $180 case unless the internal make-up of the rig speaks volumes in performance. I guess this is a user-specific quest hence it's down to your preference. A decent spacious mid-tier case for around $60 delivers very nicely too! eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/w766Mp/phanteks-eclipse-p350x-atx-mid-tower-case-ph-ec350ptg_dbk (absent of optical drive support, not sure if you're using discs in 2019). Don't get me wrong, the Phanteks Luxe is a premium offering, with superior build quality - nothing wrong with it!

The B250M remains a fantastic platform to upgrade on if you're looking to secure more performance. I would look to the used market for an 4 core 4 thread i5 or a 4c/8t i7. Or if you have the $$$ muscle, there are wider options available. If you are gaming, your current 2-core chip is limiting your performance unless you're playing lesser demanding titles. For general day-to-day use, you're looking goood

As for the initial question: You have 2 case fan headers on the mobo for 2 fans. Using splitters/internal USB hubs, you can increase that number to several. No issues there!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming/Streaming High End"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Octa-Core 3.7GHz c/ Turbo 4.35GHz 20MB SktAM4 < 289,90€

For gaming and streaming the 8-core multi-threaded Ryzen 2700X is fantastic for 290 euros! Even better, if purchasing towards the end of the year, AMD is set to launch their next gen 3000-series CPU's (Zen 2), expected within a couple/few months. The year-end plan sounds favourable!

This are the graphic cards and respective price: Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX Vega 64 8GB HDMI / DUAL DP (UEFI) Full < 399,90€ MSI Radeon RX Vega 64 Air Boost 8GB OC HBM2 < 399,90€

For 399 euros, the VEGA 64 card sounds good and a beast of a companion for 1080p 144hz gaming (a bit larger than life, but a plausible overkill for 1080p gaming at that price point). Also a very nice fit for higher resolution gaming should plans avail to upgrade to a 1440p panel (a lot later - as it's not necessary). If your current display is FreeSync enabled - the AMD route becomes a more lucrative selection point. In fact, if freesync is the primary reason why you're targeting an AMD card, you might want to check whether your display is Gsync compatible - as the newer Nvidia patch supports Gsync on FreeSync registered panels.

THE ALTERNATIVE:

Depending on your local/regional pricing, check to see how the "marginally faster" performing RTX 2070 stacks up. The Vega cards aren't the most power efficient options available with 30-40% increased power draws for optimal performance. These can get a little loud too as those fans really do kick in to keep the temps down. The RTX 2070 is faster, runs cooler, quieter and throws in a couple of added features for added visual quality/performance (DLSS/ray tracing). Purchasing at the end of the year is a long-time if you ask me - hence I wouldn't form an concrete comparisons at the moment, other than some familiarisation of cost/performance disparity.

More importantly, you don't need either the Vega 64 or the RTX 2070. For 1080p 144hz gaming, the RTX-2060 is more than capable in crushing any game you throw at it. At your displays current resolution the RTX 2060 offers an abundance of performance for demanding games on ultra settings and very capable of hitting up on 90-120fps averages (easily maxing out 144fps in lesser demanding AAA titles or in-game mid-2-high mixed configurations)

Once again, since you're purchasing towards the end of the year - same applies for the GPU - AMD is set to launch their next gen NAVI cards hopefully in the coming months or in the least towards the end of the year (if the long awaited rumours hold weight). What is expected in 2019 is unclear, as the equivalence of GPU performance for your type of configuration and performance requirements may not see the retail shelves until after 2019 (TBC)


i dont have a budget so help me out with how much should i spend and save untill the end of the year

This is just a rough idea based on your neighbours Euro currency (Spain) as it may correspond with your local pricing structure.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor €326.76 @ Electronicamente
Motherboard MSI - B450 GAMING PRO CARBON AC ATX AM4 Motherboard €139.90 @ Amazon Espana
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory €96.00 @ Amazon Espana
Storage Crucial - MX500 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive €121.91 @ Amazon Espana
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card €339.99 @ Amazon Espana
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case €79.76 @ LIFE Informatica
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply €84.90 @ Amazon Espana
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €1189.22
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-20 04:07 CEST+0200

This above is "ideal" - not absolutely necessary! Cheaper alternatives are possible for streaming and gaming (eg. Ryzen 1700/1700X/2700 paired with a lesser pricey B450 mobo, cheaper storage solution, some euro trimming on PSU (non-modular, 550W), a cheaper but feasible case and great 1080p gaming card options RX 580/590/1660/1660 ti gaming cards which will keep you above 60fps)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How good is this 1000 pound pc"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

What type of tasks is this build prioritised for? (eg. gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

For an unlocked CPU, a cheaper B360/B365 motherboard is more than adequate. Z-series mobos are a better fit for K-modifier processors.

You're not too far from securing a GTX 1660 card (£20/£30 on top). TBH, i wouldn't bother with the GTX 1060 as the RX 580 performs equally for LE$$ (unless your specific workloads demand CUDA core acceleration)

SSD: Cheaper, great quality and faster 1TB storage solution + in the newer M.2 form factor to eliminate use of SATA/POWER cable connections: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

This PSU: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/dDH48d/corsair-txm-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020133-na

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Same speed drives. No need to worry about drive performance, these are fantastic for the purpose of use.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

From a higher resolution gaming perspective the performance difference is very small which in real-time performance comparisons is negligble! Hence the same!

Where the i9 has the advantage is speedier clock speeds which does help wit faster encoding/rendering. Slightly nippier tool responsiveness too with working on video projects. But for less than $300, the 2700X is certainly not too far behind and remains a top-notch alternative for any heavy-lift projects, streaming/encoding and stands neck-to-neck in gaming quality with top end demanding titles at ultra settings.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Rather than taking a 4tb enterprise level hard drive costing around $200, 2 consumer-level 2TB HD's costs far less. If you don't need so much storage, I would stick with a 2TB single drive as my secondary storage as the 1TB primary device is more than sufficient for the OS, applications and games (unless your game library is huge which is more fitting for a HD)

With WIFI included:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $294.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte - X470 AORUS GAMING 5 WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard $174.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $78.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.78 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.78 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB VENTUS Video Card $699.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT - H700 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $125.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $83.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit $110.59 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1797.89
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-19 18:34 EDT-0400

A second rig? You're buying 2 machines?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First time building a PC, going for cost effectiveness. What do you guys think?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

https://pcpartpicker.com/user/joey101937/saved/3cNGcf

Looks good! Thats a decent budget case too with plenty of airflow.

You don't need thermal paste, it's pre-applied on the stock cooler

My only concern is that trimmed off ASUS GPU which comes with a small heatsink. It would be more than sufficient for these power efficient GPU's but you can do so much better taking the cheaper MSI card as recommended earlier. It also comprises of a higher factory OC for some added performance and is accompanied with a full-size HSF for solid-cooling and long-term thermal resilience!! ASUS makes some fantastic top-end GPUs (although over-priced) but on the lower spectrum of mid-tier performance cards, the competition with these newer RTX cards is simply way better with MSI (some nice overclockable advantages too). ASUS continues to mark up costs adding to brand value hence not worth a dime more in my personal and strong opinion.

oh also I removed the windows10 because im gonna try to use my old harddrive that i think is still good from my laptop with windows alreay on it. That does work right?

Won't work!! Plus, you want to install Windows on the SSD to benefit from the drives nippier performance. Windows on HDs are more-or-less a bottleneck for modern day CPUs. The workaround here being, if you have a license for your Windows OS (assuming it's Win 10), a fresh install would be highly recommended for best performance. If you don't have Windows installation media, you can create one using "Windows creation media tool" to a USB stick.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

You can definitely save a bunch of money! For your purpose of use the i9 is not necessary but a nice luxury. I actually prefer AMD for this type of workload, much better value to performance ratio + the AMD board is compatible with the next generation of AMD Zen 2 CPUs which makes for an excellent upgrade path.

To save money you don't need an AIO cooler too, the 2700X comes with a fantastic RGB cooler which simply gets the job done. I would much rather take a 1440p display with a top-notch RTX 2080 gaming card first and then see what I have left in the spending pot to secure other aesthetically pleasing additions.

Something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $294.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus - Prime X470-Pro ATX AM4 Motherboard $149.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $78.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.78 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.78 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB VENTUS Video Card $699.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT - H700 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $125.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $83.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit $110.59 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1772.89
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-19 17:56 EDT-0400

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First time building a PC, going for cost effectiveness. What do you guys think?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm familiar with the MS ID transfers but those pertain to full licences when switching mobos. MS ID's maintain the same principle at the root-core with digital hardware ID recognition, whereas OEMs maintain digital-entitlements per fixed hard coded system recognition (server-side).

I'd be more than pleased if MS shifted these restrictions hence if you have any official statements from MS, clearly informing of OEM hardware-ID transfer allowances, i would be keen to examine them. Myself and our partner firms have a ton of machines with OEM markings hence it would be a life saver for future upgrades (the sucker being, signing up with a multitude of MS accounts)

Or even better, if you have successfully achieved this result i'm all ears :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Desktop Build Please Check It Out!"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry i don't share my personal contact details in online platforms/privately. Feel free to message me privately via PCPP. On my profile page hit "send a message" located at the bottom left (i think)

Can you send me your updated PCPP parts list in order i can see where you are with your current selections. Use the permalink URL which is located above your parts list.

BTW - FreeSync is not limited to AMD CPUs but AMD GPU's. Problem here is, Nvidia is dominating the higher end GPU market and going over to AMD at this point would mean lesser power efficiency, similar cost and a little drop in performance if you're targeting the AMD Radeon VII (RTX 2080 equivalent)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First time building a PC, going for cost effectiveness. What do you guys think?"

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Can you provide the official source? From my understanding OEMs are a one-time transfer possibility for windows upgrade allowances only (eg. win 7 to 10). Even those are circumstantial past the original deadline date and require MS tech support assistance.

Where OEMs are transferable are between storage devices (switch) with the motherboard hardware ID being the limiter on MS servers. If these rules have changed i'd be very interested to see some official statements.

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