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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Ideally the higher tier boards are more of the enthusiast range unless specific features or additional I/O functionality is an absolute requirement. A build targeting "gaming" and "office work" can easily prolong pure satisfaction with a mid-tiered series board as it's simply got you covered with all the "must-haves".

Unless you can point out specific requirements, both the ACE + AORUS Ultra are more edging towards "extreme overclocking". A decent mid-tier board can achieve similar performance, excellent thermal packages and more than sufficient power delivery arrangements. With a 9600K, a lesser demanding CPU opposed to it's 8-core hyperthreaded bigger brother (9900k series) would very comfortably support a mid-tier platform (likewise the 9700K).

Mid-tier options:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZwJtt6/asrock-z390-extreme4-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-extreme4

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/GPdxFT/gigabyte-z390-aorus-elite-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-aorus-elite

Or a more affordable higher tier board if you desire one:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/TnhKHx/asrock-z390-taichi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-taichi


Personally I wouldn't bother with a 9600K and push for a 9700K for more discernible future proofing. Hence saving a little on the mobo side of things for a 8 core CHIP makes sense. In fact here in 2019, unless "overclocking" is an absolute MUST, i'd be more leaning on 3rd GEN Ryzen CPUs. More-so if the idea is to game on higher resolution displays with the likes of 1440p/4K. At 1080p, intels single threaded performance does stand marginally taller hence worth the effort for some.

Seeing that some boards have M2 slots that 'share' and or disable SATA ports. Preferably I don't want to deal with any such boards.

Honestly this should be the least of your concerns as these boards consist either of 6/8 SATA ports. Unless you're intending on populating the build with an equal number of SATA devices, this shouldn't be a problem. You don't need to do anything different other than check the mobo manual to see which port is disabled and just avoid that one when adding SATA devices. BTW, all consumer boards carry the same compromise so no secondary option here.

For a more concise recommendation, create a parts list on PCPP and share it and confirm the following:

  1. Budget?

  2. Display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 144hz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16GB for 3700X - B450 Tomahawk Max"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

This baby: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB DDR4-3600

3600Mhz 16CL holds true on the Tomahawk MAX. I've had the pleasure on working on a similar build but with a Ryzen 3600. The XMP presets enabled the rated spec with immediate effect. Problem being, after a BIOS update to get a taste of faster OS load times, the modules capped out around 3200Mhz. This was easily resolved via manual tweaks (DRAM voltage over-ride + 3600Mhz adjustment)

Keep in mind, the heatsink height on these sticks can hinder CPU installations depending on what you're targeting. Some beefier cooler options may not offer sufficient clearance for taller sticks. If you're sticking with the stock Wraith Prism cooler - no problem, otherwise double check clearance compatibility.

Comment reply on Djbenxnyc's Completed Build: Captain Phasma

  • 6 days ago
  • 2 points

nah the mirror shine wouldn't have done it for me (yep i'm making it all about me lol and i don't like too much bling bling) IMO, the finish achieved is astoundingly, exquisitely, elegantly picturesque.....and not to forget with a pinch of a classically "vintage" FINISH!

6 hours of work paid-off nicely +1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Blue-sky / dream machine: Evga "Dark" Build / 2080Ti XC2 (Sub $4500ish)"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

What do you think of the CPU on that mobo?

I want to run 1440. I have this monitor: https://www.amazon.com/Dell-Alienware-Monitor-Resolution-Overclocked/dp/B0777RY75V/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=alienware+34%22&qid=1575420103&sr=8-4

I was wandering whether the 2080 TI made sense for this build. With that (1440p ultra) demanding display resolution it absolutely makes sense (although these are pricey cards).

Your display is sublime - the envy of my eye :) I was actually thinking of upgrading to something similar but as usual always holding back considering cost.

You're basically in the "higher resolution" gaming category with thicker pixel densities stemming from a 3440x1440 pixel count. For gaming this somewhat changes things in the CPU/mobo department unless single threaded supremacy enthusiasm suggests otherwise. Essentially, with higher resolution gaming you're going to achieve the same game performance with a cut-throat Ryzen 3700X which is going for only only $300. At best the 9900KS may draw in a few extra FPS pointers but for non-perceivable performance gains and an added premium of $225, for me personally the 9900KS is simply not justified. Where the 9900KS will see more deserving advantage is single threaded tool manipulations in audio production workloads but nothing too extravagant to beg a $225 asking price. You'd be better off grabbing a 12 core Ryzen 3900X to boost audio rendering speeds as these types of workloads are higher core count savvy. Also fantastic for heavier multi-tasking whilst gaming or running simultaneous productions projects on the go.

Dropping some of the "Overkill", without compromising performance but adding valuable gains in specific workloads, here's where I'd be: (keeping the EVGA theme in check, ALTHOUGH mobo possibilities suggests otherwise)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $499.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler EVGA CLC 360 74.82 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $150.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI MEG X570 ACE ATX AM4 Motherboard $319.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $273.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.97 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $204.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $1149.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT Phantom 530 (Black) ATX Full Tower Case -
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA P2 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $159.99 @ Best Buy
Optical Drive Pioneer BDR-209DBK Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer $74.99 @ B&H
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3089.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-04 19:25 EST-0500
  • $1200 savings and an equally robust build

  • For Storage i've thrown in a fast 1TB NVME for the operating system and applications. For audio production workloads you'll want to run all active projects on this drive and archive/backup completed projects to the secondary drive. For the secondary drive, also thrown in a 2TB NVME as these are very reasonably priced and you're spending power is adequate to drop spinning/louder hard-drives all-together. If you need 4TB, personally I'd opt for a more affordable HD but performance enthusiasm may fancy a 4TB SSDs which are achievable for around $400.

  • In my opinion titanium PSU's are way-over-rated even for long-haul tasks with only a 2% increase in efficiency. I rather pay a little extra on the electricity bill on an annual basis opposed to spending half a grand on a PSU. Platinum units are also a little overkill for gaming and the "possible" audio production workloads (assuming you're not going to be running long-haul job-lots 24/7)....but.... far more reasonable in terms of cost. Hence added the EVGA PT series @ 750W (more than enough wattage power for this sort of build - more as in overkill already).

  • I admit the corsair dominator RGB RAM modules look nice. But are you willing to pay around $200 more for RAM aesthetics? Performance wise, the G-Skill 3600Mhz 17CL is on par and in my opinion if you fancy some RGB, these are the best looking sticks on the planet.

  • As for the motherboard - the EVGA is way is way over-priced and is more edging towards custom liquid cooling arrangements. Not sure whether they've sharpened up on the BIOS config, but a couple of years back the limitations were poor, updates were lacking relevant optimisations and the user-experience with some of the OC technicalities were awful. I'm sure at this price range some of those hindrances have been set aside but I'd be more leaning on the more renowned brands with the likes of MSI, ASUS, GIGABYTE and ASrock where product maturity scales very nicely with excellent performance, more convenient user experience + easier UI in BIOS with a ton of configurability. If you end up sticking with the 9900KS, judging from the reviews online (just checked today), the "EVGA Z390 DARK" does pass with flying colours hence nothing of note to be concerned about (although i'd recommend looking further into user feedback before pulling the trigger).

  • Last but not least - the case! I'm not sure about this one (left it as it is). With powerful components in a build with the likes of a 2080 TI + 9900KS/3900X, i'd be more leaning towards a more "airflow friendlier" case. Essentially something that doesn't hinder the extraction of air with the likes of either well-perforated vents/openings (eg. NZXT H700/H710) or a full meshed out frontage (Eg. Fractal Design Meshify C), amongst other options. The phantom 530's stack of drive cages and lack of intake is a hindrance to airflow. Furthermore, the acrylic glass side panel robs the "premium" appeal whereby Tempered glass is desirable. You might even fancy a PSU shroud for a cleaner finish. It's definitely not a bad case and will run fine with this sort of arrangement as it does tick several other boxes but IMO there are better options available. Since case selection is a subjective dept i'll leave this one to your discretion.


Of if you absolutely desire going the 9900KS route with the initially selected EVGA DARK Z390, you can still save plenty of money:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i9-9900KS 4 GHz 8-Core Processor $524.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler EVGA CLC 360 74.82 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $150.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard EVGA Z390 DARK EATX LGA1151 Motherboard $499.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $273.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.97 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $204.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $1149.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT Phantom 530 (Black) ATX Full Tower Case -
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA P2 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $159.99 @ Best Buy
Optical Drive Pioneer BDR-209DBK Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer $74.99 @ B&H
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3294.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-04 19:52 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Memory won't run higher than 2133mhz?"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm less than psyched about the idea of transferring everything over to a new mobo. Still, if there's no other way, that sounds like the way I'm going to have to go eventually

What you could try is "manually" configuring DRAM voltages and raise the frequency - providing you're comfortable with overclocking. Raising DRAM voltages may also force down-volting or setting an off-set on CPU voltages (on these particular older board models) for stability. The trick is to down-volt to a reasonable rate without either losing performance or only trimming a narrow drop in CPU speeds (which won't have any/much noticeable impact in gaming performance). It make take several tries to get things in balance or it may not work altogether.

2133 vs. 3200 sounds like it will have a pretty dramatic performance increase.

Yep - keep in mind, although the modules are capable, several external factors may hold you back @ 2666-3000Mhz - which is equally beneficial as Ryzen demands faster speeds.

Is the board you recommend likely to last me a good 3-5yrs?

In terms of reliability/durability, way more than 5 years unless unexpected hindrances occur (same applies to all mobos)

In terms of upgrade-path, no, all current compatible AM4 sockets will see their last upgrade in 2020 with Ryzen 4000-series CPUs.

My case should support a standard ATX

You'll want to double check..... lol A couple of years ago I accidentally purchased a Micro-ATX Fractal Meshify C case when the intention was a reg ATX. I'm still recovering in 2019.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrade from ryzen3 2200g to ryzen7 3700x"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Compatible via BIOS update. Keep in mind, it is an entry level board and may run a little hot and may compromise boost clocks from reaching rated speeds. Then again the 3700X is rated at 65W hence no major concerns other than pre-applied voltage overrides which can get a little on the heavy side (something manual tweaks can easily address).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Blue-sky / dream machine: Evga "Dark" Build / 2080Ti XC2 (Sub $4500ish)"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

You might fancy an EVGA 360mm RAD: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/s3FKHx/evga-clc-360-7482-cfm-liquid-cpu-cooler-400-hy-cl36-v1 Although you may need to switch the case to accommodate one. The 9900KS boosts up on 5GHz on all cores and as expected runs hot. A 360 RAD will lessen fan cycles for a little quieter ops.

I know Im wasting money on a couple things here.

PSU, RAM, SSD are overpriced.

For the SSD, you might be interested in NVME M.2 drives. 3/4x faster performance. Whether your workload can benefit or not, these are more reasonably priced. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/88bwrH/hp-ex920-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-2yy47aaabc or you could even double up to 2TB and still save money, eg: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/LxXnTW/sabrent-2-tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-sb-rocket-2tb

Practically the same performing RAM @ 3600Mhz 16CL are achievable for as little as $150-$200 - with the added bonus of tighter timing controls for superior performance. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/w3FKHx/gskill-trident-z-neo-32-gb-2-x-16-gb-ddr4-3600-memory-f4-3600c16d-32gtznc Obviously, the design/aesthetic element may vary by preference but having a hard time to digest the cost of the Corsair Dominator Platinum

PSU - the build as it is will barely touch on 400/450W. 650W/750W already being a plausible overkill. Even 850W is more than sufficient if you were to drop in a second GPU. 1600W is out of this world! The added premium for the Titanium efficiency banding is pointless too unless you're running the build 24/7 non-stop for some electric bill relief.


If you don't mind me asking, whats the build for?

If gaming, what are you pairing up with the GPU in terms of display resolution and refresh rate? Eg. 1080p 144hz

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What would be a good Ryzen alternative?"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

Ignore the compatibility error. It's a mistake on the PCPP's part. The newer MAX motherboards are fully compatible with 2nd and 3rd GEN Ryzen CPUs.

Manufacturers official spec/compatibility sheet: https://asset.msi.com/pdf/main/global/presale_v2/B450-TOMAHAWK-MAX?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build in a While - Intel Gaming/Audio Editting"

  • 7 days ago
  • 2 points

For an already purchased build - stick with it.

Specs-wise, it's a solid performer for gaming. All the parts perfectly compliment one another and nothing is short of quality/performance. With a K-modifier CPU, the AIO cooler may be a little overkill at stock but easily lends hand to overclocking possibilities.

As for the display, this ones down to user preference. Some competitive gamers will prefer 1080p with display refresh rates exceeding the 144fps limit. Hence your current model will suffice as it's capable of hitting 144-240fps. 1080p panels are still fantastic for gaming and place lesser demand on GPU resources opposed to 1440p higher resolution panels. These greater rendering demands are in excess of 35/40% hence 1440p, although does offer better visual quality, reduces FPS performance.

As for the Display model itself, i'm not familiar with this unit nor do I have any long-standing experience with any 240hz panels.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Recommendations for new Mobo/Cpu/Ram"

  • 7 days ago
  • 2 points

I just use the PC for word processing, internet surfing, and occasionally playing Tiger Woods 2008 :)

Ideally, A $70-$90 4-core CPU is sufficient for this sort of task. But agreeably, a 6 core multi-threaded 2600/2600X with cut-throat prices is a difficult one to pass. Especially if you're open to more demanding gaming content later or just fancy something which is open to long term possibilities.

It essentially boils down to your budget (?)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is this CPU compatible with my mother board"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

With a 9600 K-modifier CPU, the following compatible options are worthy of consideration:


BTW - if you don't already own the 9600K and aren't looking to overclock, have you considered going the Ryzen 3600/3600X route? Essentially very similar single threaded performance but adds 6 additional threads for faster multi-threaded compute performance (the better future proofer).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build in a While - Intel Gaming/Audio Editting"

  • 7 days ago
  • 2 points

The parts are shown as already "purchased". I'm assuming this is incorrect?

If none are purchased, whats the budget (incl. display)?

Is 240hz gaming an absolute must or are you open to the sharper image (higher resolution) 1440p 144hz displays?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is this CPU compatible with my mother board"

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

Not compatible.

The best available CPU for these 200-series boards is the i7-7700K. The downer being a new 7700K is simply not worth the asking price unless achievable for considerably less (via the used market).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What would be a good Ryzen alternative?"

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

For faster software encoding - Ryzen's value plan with multiple cores and multi-thread compute performance takes the win. This type of arrangement would require a discrete graphics card as higher core count Ryzen processors do not support integrated graphics. This is where the "value" turns a little ugly as you'll be forced to spend more for a graphics card.

If you're supporting single 1080p 60fps encoded streams (or lesser demanding performance targets), the intel i5 path with integrated graphics is simply more than adequate with plenty of juice in the tank. Either of the following 2 options will suffice: i5-9400 ($130) or for 12-14% faster single threaded performance, the i9-9600K.


THE ALTERNATIVE SOLUTION (incl. discrete graphics card)

Seeing you're willing to fork out around $700 for the build, a faster multi-threaded CPU with discrete graphics is achievable "for" less:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $119.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston A2000 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $54.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GT 710 2 GB Video Card $53.00 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case $61.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Corsair
Case Fan ARCTIC ACFAN00119A 56.3 CFM 120 mm Fan $8.27 @ Amazon
Monitor BenQ GW2480 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $99.00 @ Adorama
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $637.20
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-02 21:10 EST-0500

Or, if your software based encoding fancies something a little more robust with 8 cores + multi-threading for the long run (encoding process flexibility to higher quality output or higher resolution streams) - The Ryzen 2700X is achievable for only $160 and comes bundled with a pretty decent stock cooler. Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $159.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston A2000 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $54.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GT 710 2 GB Video Card $53.00 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case $61.00
Power Supply Corsair CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Corsair
Case Fan ARCTIC ACFAN00119A 56.3 CFM 120 mm Fan $8.27 @ Amazon
Monitor BenQ GW2480 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $99.00 @ Adorama
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $675.23
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-02 21:14 EST-0500

Keep in mind, a dedicated GPU also opens up doors for multi-display arrangements (if that's something you might fancy in the long run).

BOTTOM LINE: For a $700 encoding/streaming build - the 2700X + GPU is a blast!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need opinions with this build"

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

So you think this aftermarket gpu is better than the founder?

Absolutely!!

It is always likely to achieve better performance with respectable aftermarket solutions as the primary purpose behind partner cards is "improvements". What the EVGA card does immensely better is that chunky 3 pcie slot towered heatsink which does a wonderful job with heat dissipation. A cooler card resorts to lesser ramped fan cycles, ultimately lowering acoustic levels for quieter ops.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need opinions with this build"

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

A better upgrade possibility would be the X570 mobo but this is only specific to a certain user-group who may employ a higher core count CPU with the likes of a 16 core 3950X or a 4000-series 12/16 core pacier equivalent. If your workload requirements has zero influence with higher core-count options, the Tomahawk MAX is ample.

what do you think of this case

Excellent case option if you're looking for a minimalist bold compact approach. Surprisingly decent airflow too considering it's a single sided vent for air intake.

Also have a look at the H510 - a revised model hosting a Type-C port on the front panel. This could come handy as type-c standardisation is in full force.


If you haven't purchased the GPU already, i'd add $20 and grab this aftermarket solution from EVGA: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/xxrYcf/evga-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-xc-gaming-video-card-08g-p4-3172-kr (better thermals, less noisier + some marginal factory OC applied). If purchased already - no problem! You're not missing out on much.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrade GTX 1060"

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

$1000 opens up greater possibilities which are more inclined to higher resolution gaming with the likes of a RTX 2080 SUPER ($700-$750) or a RTX 2080 TI ($1000-$1050).

For 1080p 144hz I wouldn't look past the RTX 2070 SUPER which is achievable for around $500. The higher end cards at 1080p will deliver a small performance gain for a vastly fattened up asking price. For eg:

  • 2070 SUPER averages around 130-140fps in demanding games on top settings. Much higher FPS counts with lesser demanding titles with the likes of fortnite, overwatch, etc.

  • For a fat $200 more the RTX 2080 SUPER only delivers 10-20fps more (or 10-15% greater performance). Bad value

  • For a vastly fattened up $500-$600 more, the RTX 2080 TI only secures around 20-30fps more (or 20-25% greater perf). Terrible value!!

If you don't mind spending more and just want something superior for the budget prospect, I guess the RTX 2080 SUPER is doable. Personally I'd stick with a 2070 SUPER and look for an earlier upgrade path with greater performance gains in the near future (few years in the least).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrade GTX 1060"

  • 9 days ago
  • 2 points

Double checking....$1000 max ceiling including the above linked build? or just the GPU?

What display resolution and refresh rate are you running? (eg. 1080p 144hz/etc)

If the linked build is included in the budget:

  • is this for gaming only?

  • maybe link up your old build as some parts may be relevant for the newer one.

  • can you share the parts belonging to the older build

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Memory won't run higher than 2133mhz?"

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

A320's are not officially supported for 3rd GEN Ryzen. Yes, board manufacturers may deploy BIOS updates for a functional 3000 tiered chip but locked features/performance limitations will apply (in your case - RAM bandwidth + restricted CPU boost clocks).

Rather than purchasing RAM, you'd be better off picking up a B450 "MAX" series motherboard. The Crucial BS LT memory sticks are fantastic and you should be able to push these up around 3200Mhz via manual OC. The higher the bandwidth the closer the boost clock performance ceiling with 3rd GEN Ryzen!

Something like: (MAX = revised with a larger BIOS chip for 3rd GEN full compatibility)

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/BHBhP6/msi-b450-gaming-plus-max-atx-am4-motherboard-b450-gaming-plus-max

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/jcYQzy/msi-b450-tomahawk-max-atx-am4-motherboard-b450-tomahawk-max

Only consider the above if your case accepts a standard ATX sized motherboard. Your current mobo is Micro-ATX and if the same principle applies to the case, try locating this board (currently unavailable): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/h7WBD3/msi-b450m-mortar-max-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-b450m-mortar-max

Comment reply on Forum Topic "HELP URGENT QUESTION"

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

Stick with the bundled paste, it's top quality stuff!!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My computer won't boot up after everything plugged in, did I miss anything?"

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

If the linked image is a snapshot of the assembled build, you haven't connected the "front panel connectors". These are connectors which stem from the Case's front I/O panel (power switch, reset switch, HD led, etc). This would be the reason why the case power button is failing to juice up.

The "system panel header" (located at the bottom right of the motherboard - a group of 9 pins) is where the "Front Panel connectors" hook up to. Refer to the mobo manual to have these correctly attached. You won't be using all 9 pins, only the ones the case front panel connectors require.


If the Panel Connectors are already in place - some other likely possibilities:

  • Make sure the power button on the PSU is on the "ON" position.

  • Double check all power connections from and to the PSU. Especially the 8-pin CPU connector (top left) and 24-pin ATX (on the right). These may require a little force to snap in. From the linked image I can't clearly make out whether the top 8-pin is connected or not.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need some advice with my first build - Black Friday 2019"

  • 10 days ago
  • 1 point

Unless i'm missing something, for a pre-built this is a solid build with solid part selections. My only concern is the PSU. Maybe ask the seller what they're using to juice the rig - a power-frenzy build of this sort needs an equally performance savvy PSU.

The comparison here would be a little unfair as you could have easily grabbed a RTX-2080 SUPER build had you opted for more affordable parts without compromising performance. For eg:

  1. A more affordable, non-RGB NVME SSD for around $90

  2. $130 saving with a B450 MAX Ryzen 3000 ready motherboard

Or, for $1500 > a better optimised non-reference 2080 super + quality driven PSU + faster RAM

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $299.99 @ Walmart
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $89.99 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $82.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $719.99 @ B&H
Case Cooler Master MasterCase H500 ATX Mid Tower Case $99.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1507.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-30 20:59 EST-0500

To look on the brighter side of things, for $1399 it's a damn good good build and I wouldn't frett over it.

  • The higher end X570 motherboard is open to extreme overclocking (although not much headroom available with 3rd gen) or higher core count compatibility. Plus, a better candidate to drive 4000-series CPU upgrades if it comes to that.

  • The RTX 2080 SUPER demands almost $200 on top for only a 8-10% performance gain. Or 10-12% perf gain via higher resolution gaming (1440p/4K). You're definitely not missing out on much and this can be easily compensated with a soft tweaks in game settings without losing noticeable visual quality. I'd fancy a 2070 super anyway with an earlier upgrade path in mind (2-3 years). Past the 2070 super (which is already an expensive card), GPU prices are "day light robbery" and i'd be more excited with the earlier upgrade adoption opposed to dropping a chunk of my hard earned cash on flirtatiously trifling performance advantages.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which way do the fans blow?"

  • 10 days ago
  • 1 point

"Blowing in" or "push" makes sense. This type of configuration applies a stiffer static press of air against the fins and is favourable for improved temps. These types of thermal benefits are largely seen in arrangements where the RAD is directly receiving cooler air through a meshed panel or wider side vents. For example, in my S340 elite (non-mesh) both orientations (push/pull) see very little difference in temps (in my test, none)....whereas my Meshify C case (as the name suggests "full meshed frontage") sees a 1-2c drop in temps. These tests were conducted using a lesser strenuous stress test (realbench) and i'm certain heftier synthetic stress tests with the likes of Prime95 would deliver more favourable results in the 2-3c (or 4c) category or lesser in the summer.

In real-world workloads / gaming, the performance difference is negligible hence if you want to maintain the aesthetic appeal with a pull configuration - that works perfectly fine too! I eventually stuck with a pull-config on the Mesh C as our actual workloads saw zero benefit (or at best a pointless 0.5c drop which wasn't worth the aesthetics compromise)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Suggestion upgrade gaming build, ssd or NVMe woth ?"

  • 10 days ago
  • 2 points

Whether its a SATA/NVME driven SSD or a typical hard drive, this doesn't have any impact on gaming performance. SSDs are great for faster game load times (about 35-40% faster) which might save you around 10-20 seconds in load times (depending on game type) but other than the initial load-up there's not much benefit.

If you absolutely want a faster SSD regardless of the performance proposition, i'd grab a consumer entry-level NVME @ 1TB (simple reason: it's only $82). Something like: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

Or the more cost effective solution: Stick with the Sammy evo and place your most played games on the SSD and all other titles on the hard drive. TBH, i don't mind waiting 10 seconds or so more for game load ups - think of it as free meditation!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2nd pc build"

  • 10 days ago
  • 1 point

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/m6WB3C

A couple of parts you'll want to carry forward:

  1. The higher performance tier Cryorig H7 cooler performs way better than the Hyper 212 evo. I recall picking one up for around £35 a few years back and it performed way above expectations.

  2. The PSU is 100% more than adequate for a performance savvy gaming rig. Carry it forward!

  3. (OPTIONAL) The S340 is an excellent case with sufficient airflow. This ones optional per user preference as I can see the minimalist appeal with the H500. If you're opting for a new case anyway, you might be interested in the newer H510 model. It's more reasonably priced + includes a front panel type-C connect.


2) 1500 ballpark figure.

3) Gaming and i might end up streaming games.

So $1500 for gaming and streaming

If your streaming ambitions hold weight you'll definitely want to target one of the following options:

  1. RTX 2060 SUPER / RTX 2070 SUPER graphics card. For streaming the dedicated hardware encoder does wonders with lesser compromise on gaming performance (FPS)

  2. An 8-core CPU for software encoding. For best value, either the Ryzen 2700X or for 10-14% performance gains in single threaded speeds, the 3rd Gen 3700X

Assuming you might fancy both options (RTX card + 8-core CPU), this is easily achievable within the $1500 budget. Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $299.99 @ Walmart
CPU Cooler CRYORIG H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler $0.00
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $82.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $519.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT S340 ATX Mid Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA GS 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $0.00
Wireless Network Adapter Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I PCIe x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter $34.99 @ Amazon
Monitor MSI Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $169.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1292.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-30 18:16 EST-0500

Notes:

  • $200 short of the $1500 mark. I carried all 3 of the suggested parts forward to the newer build. So you've got plenty of dosh to splash on a newer case (if desired).

  • The RTX 2070 SUPER graphics card sees a 5-8% performance gain over the the 5700 XT. Runs more efficiently and quieter. On top, it's what should be targeted for streaming purposes (or the more affordable RTX 2060 SUPER). Other benefits: Ray tracing + overall better optimisations for game compatibility.

  • The 8 core 3700X CPU delivers pretty much the same "game performance" as the 3600. Difference, the added compute performance is a better fit for accommodating simultaneously strenuous workloads with the likes of streaming. Keep in mind, even if you're not streaming, games are more leaning towards higher core count gaming hence 8 cores is the finer investment for future proofing.

  • Dropped the 970 evo NVME SSD for a more consumer-based affordable NVME unit. These units are only effective in enterprise/workstation class rigs where specific workloads can benefit from the faster sequential read/write speeds. For a gaming and streaming build (and general productivity) the 970 evo will not deliver any benefit. In other words, for your type of use the 970 evo and intel 660p will deliver the same performance and where disparities may emerge in real-world environments it will go unnoticed.

  • Added faster RAM. Unlike intel, Ryzen prefers faster bandwidths to unlock the CPU's full potential.

  • Added a revised and affordable B450 MAX motherboard. These were launched recently for Ryzen 3000 CPU readiness. Essentially, no BIOS update required. Only consider going the X570 path if you feel you're open to higher core count upgrade options in the long run (3900X/3950X). The suggested B450 is very capable of handling a 3900X at stock!

  • I own both your selected and my proposed WIFI card. Performance-wise the Gigabyte unit is flawless. Since first purchase I ended up picking up 2 more, one for the office and one my sisters place. A couple of years on - "zero problems". The ASUS model is great too but i've had a couple of issues on the software side of things (buggy) and the usual on/off disconnects. Maybe newer patches have optimised code which eliminated earlier problems on win 10 - something you can probably look into from more current user feedback.

  • Last but not least....a VA panel higher refresh rate display. I can see your current panel is IPS hence avoided TN panels. This ones The MAG24C is also GSYNC compatible. A sharper image 1440p 144hz IPS/VA panel is possible within the budget. Granted, 1440p will trim around 30% performance (fps) as denser pixels place greater demands on the GPUs processing power. Nevertheless, the RTX 2070 SUPER is capable of hitting around 100-130fps in demanding games on top settings. I'll leave this one to you!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "They don't answer ,help"

  • 10 days ago
  • 1 point

EVGA, ASUS, MSI and GIGABYTE are usually the popular options but more-so for the higher-end factory overclocked aftermarket solutions. At the entry/moderate level, occasionally Zotac, Galax, KFA2, etc deliver at an equal footing, if not better. Actually Zotac at times easily challenges the 4 big dogs with custom PCB designs whilst maintaining reasonable pricing. Keep in mind - all brands use the same graphics chips (and usually PCB) and where the partner cards usually differ is cooling elements + OC potential and a bunch of other features (RGB, exterior design, memory tweaks, etc). So there's not a whole lot of a difference to be found between them other than suiting one's preference in terms of marginally improved performance or cooling (or aesthetics). The higher end over-priced models are usually custom PCB designs pushing up a little more to squeeze in some added performance. These types of cards are pointless in my opinion as they beg a huge premium on top for a narrow performance gain - which is more leaning on the enthusiast variety.

There's no clear winner as sometimes even the best of the cards on paper end up performing poorly per user feedback. To make sure you're getting the best performance (quality, thermals, rendering power, premium heatsinks, not-so-noisy fan quality/profiles, etc) you'd want to look at GPU benched reviews (if available) and check customer feedback.

For $500 the following 3 cards look to fit the bill:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/tTCFf7/gigabyte-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-windforce-oc-3x-video-card-gv-n207swf3oc-8gd

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/NxrYcf/msi-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-ventus-oc-video-card-rtx-2070-super-ventus-oc

https://www.newegg.com/msi-geforce-rtx-2070-super-rtx-2070-super-armor-oc/p/N82E16814137446?Item=N82E16814137446&nm_mc=AFC-RAN-COM&cm_mmc=AFC-RAN-COM&utm_medium=affiliates&utm_source=afc-PCPartPicker&AFFID=2558510&AFFNAME=PCPartPicker&ACRID=1&ASID=https%3a%2f%2fpcpartpicker.com%2fproduct%2fmYgQzy%2fmsi-geforce-rtx-2070-super-8-gb-armor-oc-video-card-rtx-2070-super-armor-oc&ranMID=44583&ranEAID=2558510&ranSiteID=8BacdVP0GFs-sReSy9S1fabZuZvPNMA2dQ

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Amd vs intel"

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

From the outset, "at stock" the 3600X delivers at par with the 9600K and shoots ahead with multi-threaded support (10-15%ish better performance in multi-threaded workflows). The 3600X takes the vote here.

Where the 8600K holds it's own is "OC" elasticity. Unfortunately not much can be attained with the 3600X in the overclocking department. Although 6-core single threaded, if overclocking with a 360mm rad is a given, the 9600K easily grabs the vote.

If you're looking for a spot-on long term solution and can muster up the funds - i'd fancy an 8-core single threaded 9700K/9700KF.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2nd pc build"

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

The CPU cooler potentially needing a separate adapter. Was cycling through a few different MB's and they all had the same issue. How likely is there going to be a problem?

If this is a cooler you already own (assuming you're coming from an intel platform) you'll need to purchase an AM4 bracket for $5-$10.

If purchasing a new cooler - drop the 212 evo. It's old school. Newer and better performing options are more likely to include both an intel and AMD bracket.

I highly prefer Windows 7, what kind of complications could happen if i use it?

Security is the biggest concern as Windows 7 updates/patches will discontinue towards the end of the year or early 2020. Although functional but without the big brother in the sky Win 7 is likely to be a hack-safe-haven.

picked an X570 board for the easy compatibility with the CPU. Not confident in tinkering with the BIOS so is it worth the money to avoid that hassle?

There are affordable B450 solutions which were revised for 3000-series compatibility out of the box. In other words no BIOS update required. These boards were modified with newer BIOS chips by MSI and are currently available as "MAX" variants. The best of them: MSI B450 Tomahawk MAX for $115 https://pcpartpicker.com/product/jcYQzy/msi-b450-tomahawk-max-atx-am4-motherboard-b450-tomahawk-max


If you fancy a more informed recommendation:

  1. A quick view of your currently owned build list would help to see if we can transfer parts over without compromising performance

  2. Max budget? (including build + 1080p 144hz display)

  3. Purpose of use? Or is it just gaming?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "They don't answer ,help"

  • 11 days ago
  • 2 points

So basically 2 panels consisting of 1080p 144hz + 1440p 144hz. Why not just stick with one upgrade for the primary gaming panel @ 1440p 144hz and use the current 1080p 60hz as a side kick.

If sticking with 1080p 144hz, within a $500 budget (assuming that is your regional currency) the RTX 2070 SUPER is achievable. Keep in mind narrowly lesser performing cards with the likes of RX 5700, RX 5700 XT, RTX 2060 SUPER, RTX 2070 are equally fantastic and hold true to a 100-120fps performance target (demanding games on top settings). The performance with either of these cards for lesser demanding titles easily saturates the 144hz refresh (in other words 144fps smack down!). What the 2070 SUPER does different is a 5-15% performance gain. Not a whole lot for $50-$150 asking price unless FPS enthusiasm suggests otherwise. In other words don't feel compelled to go the RTX 2070 SUPER route unless you fancy the best card the budget can buy.

If opting for 1440p 144hz - you'll want to target the best available GPU your budget can secure >>>>> RX 5700 XT or RTX 2070 SUPER

Plan on using Adobe premiere, Photoshop and other like it ,still gotta look into more

For hardware rendering across adobe packages, Nvidia is usually the front runner! Although AMD cards are seeing excellent performance in various workflows, Nvidia somewhat shoots ahead - esp in GPU accelerated rendering of special effects in premiere. If you're gearing up in this direction, both the RTX 2060 SUPER and the RTX 2070 SUPER perform masterfully with a 10% perf cavity between them.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "They don't answer ,help"

  • 11 days ago
  • 3 points

There's a whole host of cards available for the 3900X but which is best for your needs boils down to your performance and graphics quality targets. How far you can carry those achievements is also restricted by budget.

For example, if your running a :

  1. 1080p 60hz display - You're potentially looking at anything between the RX 570 and a GTX 1660 SUPER. The latter being more than capable + the better future proofer.

  2. 1080p 144hz display (assuming you want to hit on those higher fps notes) - you're potentially looking between a GTX 1660 TI and a RTX 2070 SUPER

  3. 1440p 60hz display - from a GTX 1660 TI to RTX 2070 SUPER

  4. 1440p 144hz - RX 5700 to a RTX 2080 SUPER

  5. 4K 60hz+ - RX 5700 to anywhere the budget can apply itself

The above is not cut in stone as lesser/more demanding games and game optimisations as well as performance preferences can appoint lesser performing cards for the stated resolutions/refresh rates.


To get a better idea of where you are with your performance targets:

  1. What display and refresh rate are you pairing up with your graphics card? Eg. 1080p 144hz.

  2. Budget for the GPU?

  3. If your non-gaming workloads are aimed at hardware rendering (GPU), what type of applications are you using? Or it would be a good idea to check whether AMD/Nvidia are best suited for those types of workloads.

P.s I keep hearing about the driver issues with the 5700xt's

Some issues as expected have been ironed out and others continue to haunt specific game titles. If the AMD value proposition is of interest, for the games you are most likely to play, check user feedback respective of those titles. Most popular titles are supported with user community forums - a good place to join up and ask fellow 5000-series AMD GPU owners. Keep in mind that random googling may produce earlier complaints which may have been resolved with newer driver patches.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What Ryzen"

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

If it's just gaming, i'd drop the 2700 for the Ryzen 3600. 6 cores + multi-threaded support is more than sufficient for gaming and will remain for several years to come. What the 3600 does better is "significantly" superior single threaded performance which benefits FPS. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if the 3600 delivers equally/better in multi-threaded performance when compared with a 2nd GEN 2700.

If you want an 8-core CPU from the 2000-series - I wouldn't settle for anything other than a 2700X. Especially considering these are now available for around £150(UK)/$160(US) which is "value" in the making.

If best value isn't of concern, the 3700X is a fantastic option for gaming. Although the benefits are not significant enough for me at the moment but 8 cores does deliver that added push in "future-proofing". It's basically a 3600 + 2 additional cores for long run system stability and higher core count optimised gaming.

Comment reply on KingGutierrez's Completed Build: My dream build, I named it AMMO

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

Excellent job :)

Looks great!

Yep, the stock cooler is expected to see a little higher returns in temps which is totally fine. Some of grey area here is based on the pre-configured code and voltage presets which is quite common amongst AMD stacks. For a bundled cooler, i'd say those temps look fantastic!! If personal experience (esp. accounting for noise levels) is in the negative a beefier cooler later down the line will easily compensate :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions and suggestions please! Want to have a streaming PC"

  • 11 days ago
  • 2 points

The standard B450s with the 2nd GEN Ryzen launch require bios updates. The revised "MAX" variants carry a larger I/O chip which were specifically launched for 3rd GEN 3000-series CPUs hence BIOS update is no longer required.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions and suggestions please! Want to have a streaming PC"

  • 11 days ago
  • 1 point

The 3700X comes with a bundled RGB Wraith Prism cooler. It's a pretty nifty unit for a stock cooler and drives the 2700X respectably.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions and suggestions please! Want to have a streaming PC"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

Also I almost forgot to ask. Before forking out almost half a grand on a higher end GPU, what is your gaming displays resolution and refresh rate (eg. 1080p 144hz)

As for the original query regarding "compatibility" ignore those notes as these are briefs expected with every parts list. With the above list you'll see another warning in RED, ignore that too as the CPU is 100% compatible with the B450 MAX tomahawk board.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions and suggestions please! Want to have a streaming PC"

  • 16 days ago
  • 1 point

For gaming and streaming something like this will suit you better:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor £289.99 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard £89.99 @ Amazon UK
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory £68.06 @ More Computers
Storage Intel 600p Series 128 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive £0.00
Storage Seagate Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive £0.00
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB GAMING OC Video Card £469.99 @ Overclockers.co.uk
Case Fractal Design Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case £0.00
Power Supply Corsair RMx White (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply £79.98 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £998.01
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-24 19:32 GMT+0000
  • Avoid the older GTX 1070 mode which is way overpriced. The RTX 2070/2070 SUPER replaces the 1070 with a 35-40% performance advantage.

  • The white PSU with white cables is purely optional. This 750W overkill was selected for the discounted rate and performance wise it's a fantastic piece of kit. Feel free if you prefer the standard black colour.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Getting conflicting info on Ripjaws and Thermaltake Riing Silent 12 Red in ASUS TUFF Z390 Pr Gamer"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

Anyone confirm which is right (web page or human tech)?

The email support representative may have mixed up the cooler with another. You won't have any issues with this unit.

For some added confidence - all of the following builds are using the same part with zero clearance concerns: https://pcpartpicker.com/builds/by_part/3HGj4D

Never knew this site existed until this build. Great place!

I agree :)

BTW, if you haven't done-so already, try out the "System Builder" feature and add your motherboard, RAM, CPU, cooler, etc. The PCPP filters do a great job in ironing out compatibility concerns and if anything doesn't fit you'll be warned. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need a list of pc parts"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

Will need more info:

  1. Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

  2. Is the display included in the budget? If yes, display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 60hz)

  3. Other peripherals included? (mouse/keyboard/speakers/etc)

  4. OS included?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions and suggestions please! Want to have a streaming PC"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

What are you looking to upgrade to?

What compatibility issues are highlighted?

What's the budget for the upgrade?

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/hhHCb8

Is this the currently owned build or a revised build with the intended upgrades already added?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help..1st ever PC"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm assuming you have a 240hz display already?

If you're absolutely fixated on 240fps whilst streaming, preferably a RTX 2070 SUPER card. Don't worry about overclocking.

Hardware encoding is essentially removing the encoding process away from the CPU's resources and placing the load on the GPUs dedicated encoding processor. For the end user it's as simple as opening up the streaming clients settings and changing the "encoder" to NVENC. Usually by default this is set to "x264" which is CPU software based encoding. NVENC will run 720p 60fps streams flawlessly. 1080p 60fps definitely workable but limitation may apply in quality presets (for the mainstream streamer basic 1080 quality profiles are great)

Something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600X 3.8 GHz 6-Core Processor $234.74 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX900 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $56.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $64.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.95 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1232.69
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-23 16:17 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help..1st ever PC"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

240fps whilst streaming is possible with low quality in-game presets + lower/basic quality/resolution streams (720p/1080p/60fps)

If you have a spare machine laying around, a dual system setup with a capture card with these performance targets would work best.

On a single platform you should be targeting hardware encoding via the GPU hence a RTX 2060 SUPER graphics card as the bare minimum. Alternatively, with a strong budget, preferably a RTX 2070 SUPER. Although the best value Ryzen 3600/3600X should achieve these types of performance targets, again depending on budget the preference would be a 6-8% faster single threaded i7-9700K. If you fancy some overclocking there's another 8-10% performance gains possible with a beefier aftermarket cooler.

There are options to keep both software and hardware encoding options open with a 9900K/KS/RYZEN 3700X/3900X. Best higher-perf option for lower quality CPU based encoding and gaming = 9900KS

Whats the budget?

Does the budget include peripherals + OS?

If you have a second machine available, are you open to a dual-build configuration with a capture card? If yes, drop the specs for the spare build.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Reptiles for sale"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

unless I'm 2 centuries behind in tech, I can't see the correlation between "Part List opinions wanted" and "exotic reptiles".

.....Interloping at the highest level.....

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New PC builder"

  • 17 days ago
  • 1 point

no graphics card?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Welcome - RAM and GPU"

  • 20 days ago
  • 3 points

with the plan to go 4k 144hz in the near future.

If the "near future" is closer to 6-12+ months, grab a GPU which compliments 1080p 144hz gaming (RX 2070 SUPER for $500) and wait for RTX 3000 GPUs which are expected in mid-2020 to compliment higher refresh rate 4K gaming. Gaming cards are already quite expensive and anything above the RTX 2070 SUPER is more inclining towards "bad value".

For eg.

  • The 2070 SUPER is rivalled by a 10-15% performance margin with a 2080 SUPER with a whopping $200 premium on top.

  • The 2080 SUPER is rivalled by a 15-25% performance margin with a 2080 TI with a MAMMOTH $400-$450 premium. Keep in mind, the higher performance gain here is only reflective in higher resolution gaming and not @ 1080p 144hz which sees 10-15% gains only.

The problem being if you're planning on jumping on 4K with immediate effect there is that compromise of harnessing a very high quality and pixel dense display at the expense of FPS performance. Whether it's a 2080 TI or a supposed faster functioning 3080 TI, 144fps is already a very tough ask if you're targeting demanding games on top settings. For some sort of balance at this RES, the RTX 2080 TI (or waiting for 3000-series) definitely makes sense but in my personal opinion 4K is over-rated, costly and horribly fails to impress if the user is demanding equally effectual performance with higher FPS counts (although achievable via lower in-game presets which defeats the higher quality pixel-rich enthusiasm).

A finer solution for a dedicated gaming panel is 1440p 144hz which secures 1. sharp and immersive HI-RES image quality 2. Higher FPS fluidity ~144fps. Essentially a perfect balance between 1080p/4K and delivers 55% better performance (FPS) over 4K. Alternatively a 1440p ultra-widescreen which retains around 35-40% better performance over 4K.

I guess it's purely down to user-preference! Either best of both worlds with 1440p or a richer pixel dense 4K panel with a hefty performance compromise which also ends up being the lesser future-proof option (if you're growing gold in back garden I guess 4K is manageable with more consistent earlier upgrades to newer, bigger and better gaming cards).

What is the advantage of the KS vs the K on the i9?

There's a bunch of these ninja like codes with some meaningful variants:

  • i9-9900K - K-modifier = overclocking potential + integrated graphics

  • i9-9900KF - same as above, absent of integrated graphics + a negligible 0.5-1% core clockspeed performance gain

  • i9-9900KS - Simply a higher binned 9900K launched recently. The initial K-variant carries a baseclock speed of 3.6Ghz, the KS-variant pulls ahead at 4Ghz. The K-variants boost clock is capable of hitting 5Ghz across all cores but does waiver depending on how many cores are jam-packed/power/thermal conditions. The KS-variant scales to 5Ghz on all cores unconditionally providing adequate cooling is employed.

Essentially, the KS variant sees 2-3% performance gains in 1080p gaming. Possibly 0-2% gain at 1440p (depending on game type as higher res gaming is more GPU bound). But at 4K the performance disparity is eliminated or in the least a poorly optimised game may see some negligible returns.

Keep in mind @ 4K even a $329 Ryzen 3700X competes at an equal footing with the intel i9s. Higher resolution gaming is lesser effective per advancing single threaded clockspeeds as the shift in the power vacuum is more leaning on the GPU rendering engine. In some ways it makes sense grabbing a 3700X for less and opting for an over-priced RTX 2080 TI - I guess a value man's compensation without sacrificing performance. In fact i'd prefer the 3700X route to keep the doors open for Ryzen 4000 series upgrade possibilities (expected in 2020, on the same current AM4 socket).

Also any recommendations on RAM?

If you're sticking with intel, 3200Mhz 16CL is perfect. There are a handful of CPU-intense games which do benefit with faster frequencies and tighter timing controls but the performance disparity is too small to take any notice. Although 3600Mhz 17CL are available for as little as $10/$15 more. For AMD platforms, the faster the RAM the better; where 3600Mhz 17CL and it's affordability makes it a front runner. Or even 3600Mhz 16CL if it's reasonably priced per user discretion.

32GB in my opinion is overkill. In certain circumstances, it's plausible considering long-term shared resources/background processes can dump mem-intense workloads on the available capacity. Whether it's a lucrative future-proof investment is down to user workloads/running processes in conjunction with gaming but gaming alone doesn't show any signs of +16GIGS of MEM-resource utilisation. There are a couple of SIMS (eg. X-plane) which can post beyond 16GIGS (more-so randomly) but this is purely based on user asset configurations with vaster distance 3D render or object rendition (which is CPU/MEM-levied). If your wallet is heavy and desires a trim, 32GB is not a bad idea especially being RAM is more affordable today but not an absolute.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Build, Please give me some feedback and your opinion on possible substitutions!"

  • 20 days ago
  • 1 point

With these types of performance targets I would look to close in on the max budget ceiling of $1200 with something like this:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $194.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $72.98 @ Amazon
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $95.99 @ B&H
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks ECLIPSE P350X ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $64.98 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Case Fan ARCTIC P14 PWM PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan $10.54 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1133.99
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-20 14:02 EST-0500

NOTES:

  • The storage choice has no impact in game performance, but a preference for a larger 1TB NVME storage solution as these are much more affordable nowadays. Benefits being: faster transfer speeds, faster game load/in-game asset management times.

  • The RX 5700 XT GPU is not too far off either with a $50/$60 saving. Essentially a 8-10% lesser performing card but very capable in delivering 240fps+ in lesser demanding titles (fortnite/overwatch/etc) via a mix of low/medium/high configuration. More demanding games on lower/medium setting will easily shoot past 144fps+ to as much as 200-220fps (this depends entirely on the games played / in-game configurations / game environments as denser graphic detailing impacts the rendering engines output).

  • Faster 3600Mhz RAM as 3rd GEN Ryzen requires higher bandwidths/frequencies to tap into the chips rated boost clock ceiling.

  • Grabbed a $65 550W semi-mod PSU which is simply fit for the task (if you fancy saving some cash). Granted, the 650W fully mod RMX model is superb and throws in a plenty of additional headroom (if you don't mind paying another $30).

  • An airflow savvy decent case with tempered glass, good cable management layout, PSU shroud - generally all the perks a builder should look for!! Case options are purely down to user preference. In this type of price category ($70) the Phanteks P350X is a winner (amongst a few others) hence feel free to window-shop around.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Welcome - RAM and GPU"

  • 20 days ago
  • 2 points

Also, where am I going to notice a difference between the 9900K and the 9700K? I know the i7 does not have Hyper Threading, but what would that affect in my scenario usage? Usually, I will have my game up on one screen, with various other applications up on another.

Generally for gaming only, the 9700K is more than adequate and delivers on par with the 9900K. With streaming in the mix, you'll want to stick with 9900K with multi-threaded (HT) support enabled unless you're dedicating stream material (encoding) to the GPU's hardware encoder (NVENC). Essentially, the 8 additional threads in a HT environment (9900K) delivers around 25-30% added compute performance which compliments software encoding possibilities with lesser levy on gaming performance.

Alternatively, more cores/threads opens up greater versatility on the streaming side - this is possible with a Ryzen 3900X (12 cores). Essentially, a marginal performance deficit on the gaming side and a significant increase in compute resources on the encoding side (which also makes the better future-proofer).

These are the current GPU's I'm looking at:................................

GPU preference is purely down to user discretion with performance targets + spending power in mind. With a 2080 TI in the mix, i guess "cost" is the least of concerns here. What are you targeting in terms of display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 144hz)

Also if you fancy sticking with intel and don't plan on overclocking, you might want to consider the i9-9900KS.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My First Build, Please give me some feedback and your opinion on possible substitutions!"

  • 20 days ago
  • 1 point

If possible, I'd like to get as close to 240 as I can with this budget

Are you referring to 240fps @1080p in games? If yes, this is possible in fortnite on "low" game settings BUT impossible with PUBG/MW. At lower resolutions (720p) these type of higher refresh rate targets are achievable (depending on game).

If you are desiring 144fps+ in a number of demanding games at the cost of game quality configurations you might fancy a faster single threaded 6-core Ryzen 3600 and a beefier RTX 2060 SUPER / RX 5700 / RX 5700 XT graphics card (or 2070 super if the budget permits).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1st Build"

  • 21 days ago
  • 1 point

Looks great!!

Nice cooler choice. Only £20 is remarkable! I have the same cooler installed in my brothers gaming build and back then in 2017 (checking the purchased order) this unit was costing around 35 quid.

I know I shouldn't, why not non-modular, is it bad?

PSU modularity is a user preference for easier cable management and does not impact the units performance/quality. The BeQuiet SP9 is a decent unit for moderate workloads. Uses lower quality capacitors and falls short of the efficiency standard we are seeing on similarly priced models. For a higher spec gaming build + free-flowing 12v load regulation, the TXM model sees some major improvements (the EVGA G3 does the job too, only the fan runs a little louder for my personal liking). Might need to double check but from my understanding the SP9 also falls a little short on a couple of included cable length sizes which is a nuisance for mid/full tower builds.

With £70 more, how much better (not sure how you quantify this) is 1660Super than RX590?

The GTX 1660 SUPER sees a 12%-18% performance gain over the RX 590 (depending on game). Draws lesser power, dissipates lesser heat and runs quieter. If your set-up consists of 1080p gaming and locked at 60hz (max 60fps) - the RX 590 also makes sense. For this type of performance range the 590 is a credible choice if we can look past the lesser efficiency concerns, especially considering it's a trim of 70 quid which is a significant save. This ones down to all-round performance targets with a nice dose of cost-evaluated value preference.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What should I upgrade?"

  • 21 days ago
  • 1 point

Assuming this is targeting a higher RES 1440p "gaming build " the tangible upgrade path here would be getting better FPS returns in games. This is only achievable with a higher-end GPU. Since you've got a solid performing rig already and im sure you're already easily capitalising on 80-90fps+, I would wait a little longer for next GPUs from NVIDIA.

Current higher-end GPU's carry a large price tag but offer unjustified returns in performance which makes for a poor investment. Eg. a RTX 2080 SUPER deliver around 20fps more (average) but demands a $700 spend - which is madness for most but doable if you fancy lowering the wallet weight. A more meaningful performance gain would be the RTX 2080 TI but the cost again is rampant.

Nvidia is expected to launch their 3000-series RTX fire-power sometime in mid-2020. Fingers crossed the performance gains will be more lucrative hence a worthier upgrade approach.

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