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Forum Topic "Is it compatible?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 10 hours ago

Looks great!

A quick alleviation: Faster RAM is necessary for the CPU's optimal performance (for Ryzen chips): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/wQmxFT/team-vulcan-8gb-2-x-4gb-ddr4-3000-memory-tlgd48g3000hc16cdc01

(OPTIONAL) Maybe it's just me, but i'd prefer some additional headroom on the PSU by sacrificing the semi-modular option: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FdRFf7/corsair-cx-2017-550w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020121-na

Forum Topic "Compatibility issue"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 11 hours ago

M.2 utilisation simply borrows the lanes from the SATA port/s. Hence if you take a M.2 SSD, and plug it into one of the M.2 headers on the mobo, two of the SATA ports will be disabled. This is normal!

You don't need to do anything other than check the motherboards manual which will point out the disabled one and simply avoid it when installing additional SATA devices. You have 4 additional SATA ports available.

Forum Topic "gaming/streaming pc - please help!"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 11 hours ago

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $399.50 @ Vuugo
Motherboard MSI - X470 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard $164.99 @ Memory Express
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $116.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $90.75 @ shopRBC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $66.99 @ Powertop
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB WINDFORCE OC Video Card $489.50 @ Vuugo
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $84.99 @ Canada Computers
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1513.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-21 21:21 EDT-0400

For gaming and streaming, the Ryzen 2700X's 8-cores and multi-threaded payload is the go-to solution for uncompromising performance. There are cheaper 8-core alternatives available but the X-series scales ahead with nippier boost clocks, faster core clock frequency (8-12%) and boxes a beefier cooler worth around $40-$50 cad (some nice RGB effect included)

I threw in the newer, more airflow friendly, P350X case from Phanteks (OPTIONAL)

550W is sufficient for the builds draw

Forum Topic "1st Build"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 13 hours ago

£150 for the GPU is inaccurate. Amazon's pricing this card at £260 new or £200 for going 'used'

£700 Build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor £144.97 @ Amazon UK
Motherboard MSI - B450M PRO-VDH Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard £62.98 @ Ebuyer
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory £85.98 @ Aria PC
Storage Kingston - A400 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive £46.97 @ Amazon UK
Video Card XFX - Radeon RX 580 8 GB GTS XXX ED Video Card £169.59 @ Amazon UK
Case Fractal Design - Focus G Mini (Black) MicroATX Mini Tower Case £45.58 @ Amazon UK
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply £64.99 @ Amazon UK
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit £83.99 @ Amazon UK
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £705.05
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-21 23:34 GMT+0000

The above uses a superior 6-core CPU + 16GB RAM + RX 580 GPU (GTX 1060 equivalent). The gaming card is great for 1080p resolutions hence simply good enough for a nice'n'smooth gaming experience.

You may have noticed I dropped the HD for now. 500GB SSD is sufficient for the OS, applications and a few games. You can always slip in additional storage later when needed (as simple as plug-n-play)


If you can give me any advice on how to cut the money down with similar specifications as well.

A couple of alternatives to trim cost, is needed

Forum Topic "1st Build"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 14 hours ago

M.2 utilisation simply borrows the lanes from the SATA port/s. Hence if you take a M.2 SSD, and plug it into one of the M.2 headers on the mobo, one of the SATA ports will be disabled. This is normal!

You don't need to do anything other than check the motherboards manual to see which one is disabled and simply avoid it when installing additional SATA devices. You have 5 additional SATA ports available.

Whats the budget?

Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/etc)

Forum Topic "Need a different PSU"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 15 hours ago

The 8-pin (12V) connection is sufficient. The additional EPS 4-pin connect is ideal for "extreme" overclocking conditions hence not needed (optional).

Try using another GPU port for the display connection and see if that posts up.

Re-seat the GPU

You'll want to double check all your connections again, make sure everything is snug.

Double check your front panel connectors, make sure these are in their correct positions. https://youtu.be/DPELIdVNZUI

Could be RAM related! Try booting up with one stick installed and if it fails, pull it out and stick in the other one.

If all goes south, remove the cooler and take out the chip. Check for bent pins. Make sure the coolers plastic film is removed before remounting (you never know). This process will also eliminate the possibility of a poorly mounted cooler (loose contact). Hope you've got some spare thermal paste at hand.

EDIT: If you have a spare display laying around, i'd test that method first as it may just be a faulty panel or a loosely connected one.

EDIT2: Also before trying any of the above, make sure you've got your display connected to one of the 'GPU' output ports and not the video ports located on the mobos back I/O panel. The Mobo's dedicated video output ports are only functional via APU chips and not supported with the 2700X.

If it helps, I've used the same board twice, both times utilising only the 1x8-pin connector with the 1700X + 2600 ryzen chips. Successfully overclocked both chips via the single 12V draw (1x8), although dropped the 2600's OC and enabled precision boost. In other words, your current hardware is sufficient and you already have a top notch PSU at hand!

Forum Topic "Need for Speed...Keep it Cheap"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 1 day ago

Faster gamers processing power and in-game scalability

Superior performing GPU

Primary gaming panel capable of higher refresh rate gaming (144hz)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $264.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $156.00 @ Amazon
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $84.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $114.99 @ B&H
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $459.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $74.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.90 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $224.95 @ B&H
Monitor HP - VH240a 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $109.99 @ Amazon
Other uphere Sleeved Cable - Cable extension for power supply with extra-sleeved 24 PIN 8PIN 6PIN 4+4 PIN - White $29.99 @ Amazon
Other 24 Pieces Set = 24-pin x 4, 8-pin x 12, 6-pin x 8 Cable Comb for 3 mm Cable Gesleeved Up To 3.4 mm/0.13inch) black $6.59 @ Amazon
Other Vertical Monitor Mount 30" $49.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1802.34
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-20 23:38 EDT-0400

....... you can keep whatever is left over

If you're putting the build together and value your labour at a higher percentage, the RTX 2060 is also a fantastic gaming option for 1080p high refresh panels. Although you might want to check what your friends expectations are in terms of performance (fps). The 2060 is capable of hitting 80-100fps (avg) in demanding games and the selected display is GSYNC compatible (adaptive frame sync offering smooth frame rendered output) hence a pretty versatile and top-performing gaming rig. The 2070 adds around 20% more performance which averages around +10-15fps more hence not a huge biggie if you were to give it a miss considering the asking price on top is $150-$200. Added the 2070 as the budget is inviting.

If the salvaged retainer is not of concern, an i7-9700K with 2 additional cores does present some desirable headroom/future-proofing as games are seeing better optimisation for 8-core utilisation.

A couple of other amendments applied, keeping performance in check!

Forum Topic "Looking for opinions on my part list for my first build. Thanks!"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 1 day ago

Ah, i was wandering why the 9900K - with streaming in the bag, it makes perfect sense!

Cooler:

If not overclocking, any of the options below (a slight overkill - but why not) will do the job very nicely:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Ztp323/cryorig-cpu-cooler-h5ultimate

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/93Crxr/cryorig-cpu-cooler-h7

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ffKhP6/scythe-fuma-revb-790-cfm-cpu-cooler-scfm-1100

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4TCrxr/thermalright-cpu-cooler-machorevb

If you prefer the Dark Rock Pro 4 from an aesthetics point of view and don't mind paying the added premium - go for it. Although for a non-overclocking rig, it's a sizeable overkill.

DISPLAY

Staying well-within $4000, you may prefer an IPS panel for more natural and vibrant colours, better viewing angles and less of that grey haze found on TN units. IPS panels: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/monitor/#r=256001440&D=144000,240000&A=1&P=2&sort=price&page=1

4ms response times on these IPS panels are absolutely fantastic. You can't tell the difference between 1ms/4ms from in real-time.

RAM

You might fancy these 3000Mhz RGB modules without having to cross over $200 paying more. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/rRHRsY/gskill-trident-z-rgb-32gb-2-x-16gb-ddr4-3000-memory-f4-3000c16d-32gtzr

You definitely don't need 3200Mhz. With intel even 2666Mhz 15/16CL is more than sufficient for top performance. Ryzen on the other hand demands faster bandwidth speeds.

Motherboard

I would lose the MSI Z390-A. The i9's turbo boost performance ceiling is more comfortably set with some beefier VRM cooling and power phases. It's a beast of a chip and you'll want to get the best out of it's single-threaded core performance. Any of these mobos will do the job: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#X=13625,17124&f=2&c=135&K=6,12&E=2,4&L=4&u=1&sort=price&page=1

Forum Topic "Looking for opinions on my part list for my first build. Thanks!"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 2 days ago

A 27" 1440p panel offers a more standardised pixel spread without distorting objects/text. 24" panels are more suited for 1080p displays. Also if you are targeting the overpriced 2080 TI, have you considered an ultra widescreen 1440p panel? (providing the budget can flex as these get a little pricey with some additional desirables with the likes of GSYNC/IPS/ETC)

My main concern atm is with cooling and storage.. I'm not sure what the best choices are in those areas. I'm also undecided on a case right now and my last question is how many case fans should I purchase? I see alot of builds on here with 3+ case fans.

COOLING - are you planning on overclocking? If yes, are you comfortable with AIOs (liquid closed loop coolers)?

STORAGE - looks good! Depends on your storage requirements and purpose of use. There are cheaper SSDs available with same/similar performance and also superior NVME units which are vastly more effective with certain types of workloads (usually the workstation-class). Or M.2 Sata-interface SSDs which is a newer form factor which doesn't require sata/power cables to reduce the spaghetti clutter.

CASE - this ones always a tough recommendation considering user preference holds precedence. To get the ball rolling, the Meshify C makes for a fantastic $100 choice with superior airflow, all the perks one would expect with modern day cases and plenty of mounts to throw in a bunch of fans (if desired)

FANS - Ideally a 2x2 combo is more than adequate for a top performing rig. Most will key up on a whole colony of fans for the aesthetics or demand higher volumes of air shifting throughout the case to trim off a few more degrees in ramped up overclocking conditions.

For a more realistic recommendation without entertaining overkills, the following will help:

Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

Planning on overclocking?

max budget?

Forum Topic "Good Build?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 2 days ago

If gaming is priority here, you can achieve some rewarding performance uplift within the same budget:

  • Superior single core performing i5-9600K (faster the cores, the better the gaming performance)

  • The new GTX 1660 outperforms the RX 580, ...and draws less power and yet comes in cheaper. If your display supports FreeSync you may prefer the AMD route with some performance compromise.

  • Faster SSD, although the full scalable speeds available aren't necessary but makes for the better future-proofer

  • If not overclocking, the added cooler is more than sufficient for the task/auto-boost-clock

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $329.00 @ Powertop
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler $33.90 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $199.99 @ Amazon Canada
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $85.07 @ Amazon Canada
Video Card Zotac - GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card $299.99 @ Canada Computers
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C White TG ATX Mid Tower Case $104.99 @ Newegg Canada
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1262.92
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-19 18:08 EDT-0400

EDIT: I swapped the PSU for a semi-modular - feel free to switch back to fully modular as the budget is workable. The EVGA G2 makes for a solid choice and pretty delivers as good as the above TXM series from corsair.

Forum Topic "£1000 gaming pc"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 2 days ago

The above build is great, although if you're comfortable raising the bar a little above the 1000 quid mark, I would look to secure the faster core i5-9600K paired with a beefier cooler. The compromise: sticking with 500GB SSD for storage and adding secondary storage later when needed (hard drive).

Benefits: superior cores, lower latency = more fps and more versatile in-game scalability (assuming you are targeting a high refresh rate panel/144hz)

If your display is locked on 60hz, consider the GTX 1660/1660 TI which will easily allow budget headroom to accommodate a HD whilst remaining <£1000

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor £251.59 @ Aria PC
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler £38.94 @ CCL Computers
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard £139.94 @ More Computers
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory £85.99 @ Aria PC
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive £64.86 @ CCL Computers
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING AMP Video Card £330.31 @ Box Limited
Case Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case £45.98 @ Novatech
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply £74.99 @ Amazon UK
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 Silent 37 CFM 120mm Fan £4.99 @ AWD-IT
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total £1037.59
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-19 21:53 GMT+0000

Forum Topic "first build rtx 2060+ r5 2600x mini/micro itx"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 2 days ago

Personal preference is key hence if you fancy the Mini/Micro C from Fractal (great case - i have a couple of these in the office), take it!

Only issue here is the form factor offers lesser well-suited options to pair up with the X-modifier Ryzen chip. The 2600X's performance ceiling is capable of achieving 4.0-4.2Ghz on the boost clock with an X470 better power phased mobo, a hefty VRM cooler and an aftermarket cooler $30-$40 cooler. Since one isn't available in Micro-form or within the price range, I would look to opt for the newer unlocked 9400F from intel paired with a compatible B353 motherboard. What the 2600X offers at it's best stock-2-auto-boost offering, the 9400F runs at a parallel without seeking an expensive board or beefier aftermarket cooler.

For gaming, intel offers better in-game scalability with lower architectural latency hence the better future proofer too. The 2600X's multi-thread compute performance here won't offer much advantage for your purpose of use, although some gains are expected in the long run with improved code optimisations at both software/game level but nothing extraordinary.

Also, I read that the amp! version of the Zotac RTX 2060 has higher quality Samsung memory which is why I included that in the build I am not sure if that is true though.

Thats an interesting one...maybe a source?! If true, you're not going to see any sizeable difference in performance as both cards are at a parallel in performance @ 1080p gaming. What is evident on the AMP is the led lighting addition and a tiny incy wincy higher OC potential which in real-time noticeable performance, it doesn't really do anything much. Either way, it's only 18 bucks on top so added back on!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $169.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - M9 Plus 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler $29.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - B365M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $74.99 @ Newegg Business
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $84.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.85 @ OutletPC
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING AMP Video Card $367.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fractal Design - Define Mini C MicroATX Mid Tower Case $87.40 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.90 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $954.86
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-19 16:56 EDT-0400

You might fancy this 1TB SSD as the budget is permitting: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1 (not the prettiest from a visual-perspective, but offers RAW performance at a superb value of 115 bucks + plenty of GIGS to store your games)

Forum Topic "Parts for Gaming PC with $2000 CAD Budget"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 2 days ago

I updated the above parts recommendation with a few footnotes should the budget allow.

Wifi is available on desktops too, either wifi integrated motherboards or a seperate wifi PCIE card. Although, if you have easy access to ethernet, that's undoubtedly the best option to go with for streamlined bandwidth and lowest chances of interference. Unfortunately for me, my router is in a second room and running ethernet along the hall-way makes the wife mad and the kids a chance to pull on something lol hence having to rely on wifi (decent performance though with the odd drawbacks here and there).

Forum Topic "Parts for Gaming PC with $2000 CAD Budget"

LIVE_AMMO 3 points 2 days ago

From one member to another: WELCOME! :)

  • operating system needed?

  • wifi needed?

Just a side note: for gaming whether you opt for the i7-9700K or i5-9600K, both options allow for parallel gaming performance. No doubt the 2 additional cores on the i7 do make a nice future-proofer but not necessary as 6-cores are more than sufficient.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $329.00 @ Powertop
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler $51.09 @ Amazon Canada
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $199.99 @ Amazon Canada
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Kingston - A1000 240 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $56.99 @ Amazon Canada
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $48.99 @ Powertop
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $668.50 @ Vuugo
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $84.99 @ Canada Computers
Power Supply Corsair - CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon Canada
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro Full - USB 32/64-bit $129.00 @ Amazon Canada
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG240VC 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $279.99 @ Newegg Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2028.52
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-19 16:05 EDT-0400

If you can push the budget a little higher:

  • a SEMI-modular PSU for easier cable management and 650W should overclocking be of interest: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/qn7v6h/seasonic-focus-gold-650w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-ssr-650fm

  • If overclocking the H7 cooler will allow for some moderate-2-high OC, although if you want to hit 5.0 Ghz, a beefier $100 cooler will get you there

  • Maybe a 500GB SSD for the boot drive and a few gaming titles. Doesn't help with gaming performance but does allow for some faster game load times. Or ditch, the secondary HD and opt for a 1TB SSD. You can always add a second storage device (HD) later when needed whether you opt for 500GB/1TB SSD

Forum Topic "First time Build. Please Critique"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 2 days ago

I agree with the above (although you'll need a B365 board for out-of-the-box compatibility, B360 requires a BIOS update using an older gen compatible CPU)

Its a net increase of about $30 that I think is worth it for the performance gain

To the OP - thats $30 very well spent!! the 9400F is a 6-core nippier chip (single-thread compute performance) and games nowadays are no stranger to utilising more than 4 cores for some added feat + the faster single cores translate to better in-game performance (FPS, scalability, etc).

Forum Topic "1080p, 100+ FPS on High Settings Gaming Rig"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 2 days ago

If you read along the lines....."if achievable for around $280-$300". We've seen local offers here and there sighting that price range although it's no longer a fixed shelved mark-down but when possible it does present excellent value. Value in terms of 10fps on average less compared to the RTX 2060 card for $50-$60 less.

Forum Topic "1080p, 100+ FPS on High Settings Gaming Rig"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 2 days ago

How much memory a game can utilise and how well the game can run at a capped rate of 8GB both translate to "sufficient" requirements.

"necessary" on the other hand dictates 8GB not being sufficient for BFV which is incorrect. From the game devs and from personal experience, it is affirmed, the games minimal 8GB requirement is fit for the task without any drawbacks. Where drawbacks are likely is as discussed above - if the system employs hefty memory tasked ops running in tangent with the game, system responsiveness and higher latency in memory access times are likely.

Doesn't really matter, the initial 16GB recommendation has already been listed in the parts recommendation and the 8GB counter measure was a footnote in light of potential lack of budget attainability.

Forum Topic "first build rtx 2060+ r5 2600x mini/micro itx"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 2 days ago

The Ryzen 2600X comes with a pretty decent stock cooler compared to the usual riff-raff offered with most CPUs. It's more than adequate for stock performance as well as precision boost activation hence I would stick with it.

If you feel the noise levels are not to your liking there are other aftermarket beefier options for around $30.

eg.

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hyQRsY/be-quiet-pure-rock-slim-351-cfm-cpu-cooler-bk008

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/HyTPxr/cooler-master-hyper-212-black-edition-420-cfm-cpu-cooler-rr-212s-20pk-r1

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Gqp323/cryorig-cpu-cooler-m9a

Other beefier options are available over the $50 mark, should overclocking be of interest - Although, these Ryzen chips don't offer much performance beyond the stock/auto-turbo-boost and where possible the higher voltage override is discouraging.

If you don't mind me asking, whats the purpose of use for this system? Just gaming? ...and max budget?

Forum Topic "first build rtx 2060+ r5 2600x mini/micro itx"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 2 days ago

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $184.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI - X470 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard $124.99 @ Amazon
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $84.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.85 @ OutletPC
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case NZXT - H500 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $75.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.90 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $959.50
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-19 14:12 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "excited for my first build.. any suggestions or advice is much needed... anyone see ne problems ?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 3 days ago

You don't need the i9-9900k unless you're streaming alongside gaming (or runnings other multi-core/HY savvy tasks). It's a fattened up chip for processes which demand more compute performance and games don't benefit much. For a gaming chip, the i7-9700K is also not necessary but the additional 2 cores do present a nice future-proof endeavour as games are seeing better optimisations to make use of additional cores (although at the moment such games don't see much difference in performance besides a huge bite out of the wallet).

i5-9600K - superb gaming performance and built to last!

i7-9700K - same gaming performance as the i5, but a little extra compute performance for better future possibilities

i9-9900K - OVERKILL for gaming

As for AMD CPUs - fantastic value for great performance. But when it comes to gaming, intel does it better with it's superior core speeds and lower latency! Not a huge difference between the 2.

What I will say is, at 1440p or 4K, AMD 2600X is simply good enough in matching intels performance as higher resolution gaming is more GPU-bound opposed to CPU. In some poorer optimised games, those equal footings are compromised with intel leading the way but the difference in performance is too small to shun the AMD best value offering. If you're tight on budget, AMD is a fantastic alternative for 1440p gaming!

Forum Topic "excited for my first build.. any suggestions or advice is much needed... anyone see ne problems ?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 3 days ago

(stating the obvious) Honestly, the best tip which tends to work flawlessly is watching a bunch of quick/long tutorials online to get a feel of the build process. The visual representations and talking points are highly beneficial for someone new and help to familiarise the easy-build process which most likely appear quite daunting at first.

Even better, targeting build tutorials with the same selected case for increased familiarity.

As long you're focused on the mobo manuals instructions and other guides presented by the various parts, you shouldn't have any problems.

Just make sure your build environment isn't a static fest (or ground yourself which is the common recommendation). Plan ahead to avoid obstacles and take your time with the build process.

A few common errors/issues to avoid:

  • Always make sure your cable connectors are securely snapped in to isolate poor connections should problems arise

  • Make sure the fan orientation is blowing air in from the front and exhausting from the rear and top (assuming you're settling with the NZXT case)

  • Double check the mobo manual to insert the 2 RAM sticks on a single profile ranked 2-dimm slots. This will secure best performance and added bandwidth on dual controller motherboards

  • I always find it easier to install the chip, cooler and RAM first before mounting the mobo in the case. Especially in smaller form factor or compact mid-ATX cases.

  • Oddly enough, the entire build process is somewhat easy once you get to grips with it but 'cable management' can be a pain in the backside (well for me anyway being i'm a perfectionist, hehe). Definitely take your time with this one, and plan ahead!

There's a ton of more tips but i'm sure you're already familiar with most/all of the above hence feel free to ask anything in particular.

Forum Topic "excited for my first build.. any suggestions or advice is much needed... anyone see ne problems ?"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 3 days ago

The 1080 TI remains a fantastic gaming card but not at that price range. If achievable around ~$700, it still makes for a superb gamer with plenty of power under the hood. The increase in price is more reflective of lower-supply (no longer in production/depleting stock levels) which came into effect with the release of the newer RTX 2080 (definitely the go-to card with it's added features, faster RAM, etc)

WINDOWS: OEM are single licences which are locked into the mobo. When it's time to move on or if the mobo fails, the license can't be transferred to a newer build/mobo. Fully licences = fully transferable (basically yours to keep without having to purchase again)

Forum Topic "Budget ($600) build for Lightroom?"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 3 days ago

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $164.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $74.99 @ Newegg
Memory GeIL - EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $63.95 @ Newegg
Video Card PowerColor - Radeon RX 570 4 GB RED DRAGON Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case Thermaltake - Versa H18 MicroATX Mini Tower Case $49.99 @ Walmart
Power Supply Corsair - CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $54.99 @ Newegg
Mouse Logitech - M510 Wireless Laser Mouse $19.49 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $638.28
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-18 21:39 EDT-0400

You don't really need an optical drive in 2019. Unless specific requirements demand otherwise

For lightroom, a nippier CPU would be nice, the 2600 presents a sizeable advantage over the previous 1600 offering. The stock cooler which comes with the CPU is ok'ish....consider an aftermarket cooler later.

16GB RAM added

Doubled up on SSD capacity and a speedier unit.

better and faster graphics card for the same price

It's only 40 bucks over - with some credible performance advantages, hence worth every cent!

Forum Topic "Arriving wednesday"

Forum Topic "Arriving wednesday"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 3 days ago

2 ports facing-up

and 2 ports stacked together (little tower, one above the other) facing the right side (directly below the above 2 ports).

Forum Topic "excited for my first build.. any suggestions or advice is much needed... anyone see ne problems ?"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 3 days ago

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $264.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $156.00 @ Amazon
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $84.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $119.00 @ B&H
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $44.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING OC WHITE Video Card $759.99 @ Amazon
Case NZXT - H500 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $84.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Monitor Dell - S2716DG 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $449.00 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2188.72
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-18 21:19 EDT-0400

Additional options:

  1. If overclocking a beefier air cooler or AIO is recommended

  2. If overclocking, the Tomahawk is decent, the Asrock Taichi and couple of others in the $180-$200 range offer a slight edge

  3. Mobo integrated wifi needed?

  4. it's only 10-20 bucks more for 2TB HD (secondary drive)

  5. If the budget isn't of concern, the 8-core i7-9700K would make for a nice future-proofer

Forum Topic "Arriving wednesday"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 3 days ago

Mobo = 4 SATA ports

The build looks great!

Swap the PSU for something more current and better quality-driven. These EVGA B/W series units were released over 5 years ago and even back then these were classed as a decent fit for entry-level systems (basic use or light gaming/productivity). If you were going to target a similar tiered unit in 2019, the newer entry level EVGA BR series is half decent for similar light workloads which i suspect is similarly priced.

For a gaming rig, you should move past the entry-level hot zone for something more versatile, more efficient, less likely to dissipate higher levels of heat with better/newer components and improved protection measures. The least I would target: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/FdRFf7/corsair-cx-2017-550w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020121-na or something top of it's class: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/dDH48d/corsair-txm-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020133-na

Forum Topic "help i dont know what the hell im doing, most of this stuff is help from a friend with my changes....."

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 4 days ago

Faster CPU for gaming (only consider the 2700X if you're streaming too or running other multi-core, multi-threaded process intensive workloads)

Faster GPU (will easily shoot past over 100fps)

1TB SSD (although 500GB is sufficient with a later upgrade to secondary HD storage)

Optionally applied: Micro form factor case/mobo

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $259.89 @ B&H
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - M9 Plus 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler $29.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - Z370M MORTAR Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $109.89 @ OutletPC
Memory GeIL - EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $119.00 @ B&H
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Thermaltake - Versa H18 Tempered Glass MicroATX Mini Tower Case $54.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.90 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1072.59
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-18 01:30 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "1080p, 100+ FPS on High Settings Gaming Rig"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 4 days ago

For a 'gaming only' rig, 8GB (DDR4) is "more than sufficient" even in the most demanding games. Esp. in single rank dual controller configurations with increased bandwidth and lower latency.

16GB becomes necessary if it's a cross between running games and other hefty memory-utilizing processes for better stability and stutter-free gameplay (usually third-party background processes or active game multi-tasking).

Indisputably, 16 gigs does make for a nice future-proofer (recommended) but not "absolutely" necessary unless the users overall requirements suggest otherwise.

Forum Topic "1080p, 100+ FPS on High Settings Gaming Rig"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 4 days ago

Around $1000 is sufficient for a zero-hassle gaming warrior:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $259.89 @ B&H
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - M9 Plus 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler $29.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - Z370M MORTAR Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $109.89 @ OutletPC
Memory GeIL - EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $119.00 @ B&H
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Thermaltake - Versa H18 Tempered Glass MicroATX Mini Tower Case $54.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.90 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1072.59
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-18 00:50 EDT-0400

Your performance targets are achievable for less by opting for:

  • Ryzen 2600X CPU (and using the stock cooler provided)

  • Entry level 250GB SSD for the boot drive, paired with a 1TB HD

  • A couple of other trimmings (non-modular PSU, possibly a GTX 1070 if achievable for around $280-$300 or even 8GB RAM which is sufficient for a gaming rig)

Forum Topic "Is there a better video card?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 4 days ago

BTW - Whats the build for?

max Budget?

Forum Topic "Is there a better video card?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 4 days ago

If you're getting a decent deal (discounted) for an above adequate unit for around $25 - go for it. Otherwise, in that price banding you're potentially looking at lower quality entry-level units which are a better fit for basic tasked systems which are lesser power starved (for which the newer entry-level BR series units are half-decent)

The 2017 revised CX-series from corsair for your type of build requirements is basically "true-to-purpose" and anything less at this point does present some drawbacks in quality/protection features/capacitor age or reliability/general make-over of component versatility/etc.

Regardless of some poorer quality units being workable, that compromise presents challenges which can be fatal to both the unit itself as well as the parts drawing power from it. Hence never skimp on the juice!

Forum Topic "Is there a better video card?"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 4 days ago

RX 570 for a 100 bucks is fantastic!! You can't do better than that!

I'd spend a little more for a better quality PSU - this one in particular: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FdRFf7/corsair-cx-2017-550w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020121-na

Forum Topic "Help with M.2 slots and SATA ports"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 5 days ago

You have nothing to worry about as this is normal.

The M.2 SSD shares the same lanes as one/two SATA ports which will be disabled. Since you have 6 SATA ports in total, that leaves you with 4/5 SATA ports to add additional SATA devices.

You don't need to do anything, just plug in the M.2 SSD and check the motherboard manual to identify which SATA ports are disabled and avoid them.

Forum Topic "Please help me upgrade my current rig"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 5 days ago

I'd like to upgrade it and would like to know the best parts to do this, I want to stick with Intel and NVIDIA.

Your Skylake i7 chip is superb for gaming in 2019. If you are streaming at the same time and current performance is seeing diminishing returns, an 8-core ryzen 2700X OR the faster/more expensive i9-9900K would be the go-to solution. A compatible motherboard too.

Also, can anyone tell me why my PC will sometimes not load and will tell me its overheating when it's not, makes me press F1 to go into the BIOS?

Sometimes third party apps fail in providing accurate temps. Install a reputable temp sensory application with the likes of OpenHardware (simplified and user friendly) or HWINFO64. Next time the message pops up, check these apps to see how temps measure up.

If temps are shooting up, likely reasons:

  1. Poorly applied paste - replacing the thermal paste will do the job
  2. Unevenly mounted or not mounted tight enough - replace paste and mount again
  3. Pump failing
  4. Liquid levels reduced within the closed loop (solid-pass evaporation/permeation)

3/4 are very likely with these older corsair models which come with 3-5 years warranties. Not the best of quality units when comparing with current day offerings. If a replacement is in order, consider a premium air cooler as all AIOs at some point will hit a dead end. Air coolers will last you a life-time (with the odd exception of fan replacements which last way longer then AIO cheaper fans).

Forum Topic "Want to build a PC, but have questions about old parts."

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 6 days ago

For secondary storage, your currently owned HD is simply fantastic!

The 850 EVO SSD for the primary boot drive, is as good as any current-day fast/quality-driven SATA-interface SSD.

The S340 case is also superb for any modern day build. Actually, re-phrasing: It's a modern day case! Those top/below wide air vents allow for some pretty decent airflow and the rest from a quality or feature perspective, is simply great. I currently have the S340 elite (same case but full sized tampered glass) and see absolutely no reason to swap it for any current day offering (thats with my 7700K overclocked at 5Ghz + a 1080 TI at play)

My current budget is $1000, but I can up it to $1500 in two or three weeks. Thanks for any help in advance!

Does the budget include peripherals (display/keyboard/mouse/etc)

What about the operating system (windows)?

Forum Topic "Mic acting wierd"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 7 days ago

You'll want to check the motherboards manual to download the latest software update for audio configurations. Front panel connections can either work independently via Windows default configurations (where motherboards back I/Os tend to work flawlessly) or if having problems download the manufacturers personalised software. These applications will offer additional presets/settings to manage input/output functions.

If you need help downloading the correct software package, let us know your mobo spec.

Forum Topic "Is this the best build for the money I used?"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 8 days ago

Assuming it's a gaming rig:

  • Faster, lower latency CPU with 6 cores (great option for 1080p gaming and future-proofing)

  • 16GB RAM

  • Or you could drop down to 8GB (sufficient for gaming) and grab the RX 580 gaming card for a small premium on top. Not sure if you fancy having a crack at used GPUs as an RX 580 8GB card is possible for around the $120/$130 mark

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $169.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B365M Pro4 Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $74.99 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg
Storage Inland - 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $49.99 @ Amazon
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master - MasterBox Q300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $46.98 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair - CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $54.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.49 @ SuperBiiz
Case Fan ARCTIC - Arctic F14 PWM 77.3 CFM 140mm Fan $8.45 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $714.76
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-14 00:01 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "1080p 144hz first time build"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 8 days ago

If FPS performance is absolutely vital at a higher frame output rate (closing in on the displays 144hz refresh rate), I would look to secure the i5-9600K

At 1080p, the i5 presents anywhere between 5-10% additional FPS performance in most games and only a handful of titles which are poorly optimised or multi-thread perked remain neck to neck with the Ryzen alternative. Where the i5 surpasses Ryzen significantly is it's superior single core performance and lower latency which translates to better lower-preset in-game scalability which is where you'll be more likely to reach your 144fps performance targets. The i5's overclocking headroom is superior too, which allows an excess of 5-10% additional performance.

1- I've seen a lot of bench marks with similar setup that hit the fps and some that don't, why is that? and do you think this will hit the fps I need.

Solid hardware is one aspect of achieving top-end performance, the other being the game itself (game-code). Not all games are made equal, some being better optimised, some being more demanding (tougher environments, textures, composites, etc), some are more CPU orientated with 3D scaling/map distance/multiplayer/etc and then there are games which scale better with multi-core/multi-threaded CPUs wheres others succeed at their highest performance with just 4 single-threaded cores. In other words you might have the best hardware to-date but it doesn't mean all games will run at an equal footing at the highest 'possible' FPS hardware rating.

2- I do plan on overclocking, not right away but in the future, do you think it would be beneficial to do it right away or wait?

For a first time builder. Take your time! These current day platforms with these mid-tier high performance CPUs are great for gaming and you can easily achieve maximum benefit (from a real-world noticeable perspective) without overclocking. OCs at this stage are more of a luxury especially when the system at stock is already capable of producing averages from 90-120fps (depending on game). An OC'd 10fps advantage is not going to make a huge difference as the eyes can barely measure anything past 100fps. Personally I wouldn't reduce in-game settings either to hit those higher FPS notes unless configurable settings when lowered have little or zero impact on preferred visual quality.

2a- do you think the cpu cooler I have listed will be enough ( I also will add 2 SP120 fans at the front of the case and 2 Af fans on the top, with the cpu cooling on the back )

A single RAD usually is sufficient for moderate overclocking. For a real push for added performance you'll want to secure a beefier air cooler or a 280mm AIO

3- The GPU is my biggest question, I would like the stay in the budget I have (from Canada), do I go with the GTX 1070ti or RTX 2070 or am I missing something completely and go with another product

2070 is newer but pricey, but definitely faster than the 1070 TI. Depending on games, you can expect anywhere between 10-20% higher frame rendition (more FPS).

With your performance and i'm assuming above-moderate-2-decent-high overclocking targets in mind, this would be the better solution for $20 more: (feel free to query any amendment in part selection/other)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $329.00 @ Powertop
CPU Cooler CRYORIG - H7 49 CFM CPU Cooler $51.09 @ Amazon Canada
Motherboard MSI - MAG Z390 TOMAHAWK ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $199.99 @ Memory Express
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $85.44 @ Amazon Canada
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $48.99 @ Powertop
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE Video Card $666.50 @ Vuugo
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $84.99 @ Canada Computers
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $114.99 @ Canada Computers
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $128.50 @ Vuugo
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 PWM 53 CFM 120mm Fan $7.75 @ Vuugo
Case Fan ARCTIC - F12 PWM 53 CFM 120mm Fan $7.75 @ Vuugo
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $338.96 @ Amazon Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2173.94
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-13 17:07 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "rebuilding my rig - need opinion"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 8 days ago

my question is: 1. for the first build, should i buy a GTX 1060 or 1070?

For the kids the RX 580 from AMD (GTX 1060 equivalent) is a fantastic card for 1080p gaming. Something like this with a higher superclocked factory OC + 8GB VRAM: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/MsWfrH/xfx-radeon-rx-580-8gb-gts-xxx-ed-video-card-rx-580p8dfd6

The RX 580 is very capable at 60-70fps in demanding games. If you prefer having something more competent in utilising the displays higher 144hz refresh rate or something more along the lines of a better future-proofer, at an added premium consider the newer GTX 1660 TI or RTX 2060, or possibly going the "used" route for the GTX 1070/1070 TI

For the second rig, the Ryzen 2700X's 8-cores + multi-threading would be the go-to solution for gaming and streaming simultaneously. Alternatively, if the $1200 budget permits, the faster i9-9900K. Higher resolution gaming is less CPU and more GPU orientated, hence the 2700X makes for the better cost-2-performance option.

Forum Topic "Final Part List"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 9 days ago

SATA disabling is normal on all consumer platforms with M.2 SSDs. This should only be a concern if you plan on using more than 5 SATA devices with the same motherboard. You have 6 SATA ports in total, 2 disabled to activate the NVME SSD, which leaves you 4 additional ports for any additional storage devices.

Forum Topic "Looking for Advice"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 9 days ago

For high refresh rate gaming at 1080p, the i5-8600K/i5-9600K is the right way to go about it! That doesn't mean it's necessary as the cheaper Ryzen 2600X isn't too far behind in single threaded performance. Although, if overclocking is of interest, again the i5 offers plenty of additional performance for the long run.

In my personal view, you should target the best possible CPU within your means and look to trim off expense in other areas for a more robust system with future proofing in mind

For example:

If not overclocking, a $30/$40 air cooler is more than adequate

A single 1TB SSD for the OS, applications and games comes in cheaper: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1

A bit of savings on the GPU: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/qRdxFT/gigabyte-geforce-rtx-2060-6-gb-windforce-oc-video-card-gv-n2060wf2oc-6gd

Maybe adopt the standard ATX form factor with a large case and motherboard: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/3yrmP6/msi-mag-z390-tomahawk-atx-lga1151-motherboard-mag-z390-tomahawk

Spending a little extra for a better quality PSU would do the build greater justice: If not overclocking, this 550W unit is perfect for the task: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/dDH48d/corsair-txm-gold-550w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-cp-9020133-na (semi-modular) or if overclocking a 650W unit for $108 https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/qn7v6h/seasonic-focus-gold-650w-80-gold-certified-semi-modular-atx-power-supply-ssr-650fm (semi-mod)

Forum Topic "Final Part List"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 9 days ago

Superb 1080p display: Higher refresh rate 144hz checked. It's a FreeSync panel and is GSYNC compatible with Nvidias newer driver patch (well-suited for the RTX 2060 for adaptive frame sync). VA-panel is almost as good as IPS, beats TN's poorer viewing angle concerns + lesser colour depth. Other features: Anti flicker, higher and truer colour palette for improved visual quality and less of the grey haze (85% NTSC + improved sRGB), curved panel, 1.2 displayport, 1.4 HDMI and height, swivel and tilt adjustable for a more personalised experience. In other words, VERY NICE!

Super fast NVME SSDs may not be necessary for your purpose of use but for $110 (almost 50/60 buck cheaper since 60-90 days go), this ones hard to resist: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9nhKHx/intel-660p-series-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ssdpeknw010t8x1 It may not look pretty but its pretty damn fast!!

Forum Topic "Can anyone improve this for me without upping the cost to much"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 10 days ago

This build is better suited for your spend with superior performance in mind!

  • A current and superior performing Ryzen 2600X CPU (double the performance for multi-threaded workloads)

  • Double the RAM capacity and faster 16GB DDR4 modules (keeping the theme perspective in mind with red sticks)

  • 1TB fast SSD for the OS, applications and games.

  • A newer Nvidia RTX 2060 gaming card. You can expect around 25-35% higher fps performance with this card. No need to play games on medium settings, as this build is capable of pushing game settings to the max without a problem. The GTX 1060 is old and I wouldn't pay pay more than $180 for that card.

  • A larger 24" display with 144hz refresh rate. It's a FreeSync panel and is GSYNC compatible with Nvidias newer driver patch. It's not IPS but that shouldn't be a problem considering VA panels for gaming are excellent. Other features: Anti flicker, higher and truer colour palette for improved visual quality and less of the grey haze (85% NTSC + improved sRGB), curved panel, 1.2 displayport, 1.4 HDMI and height, swivel and tilt adjustable for a more personalised experience.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $184.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard Gigabyte - X470 AORUS ULTRA GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard $119.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $84.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB WINDFORCE OC Video Card $364.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case NZXT - H500 (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case $76.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Newegg
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $224.99 @ Walmart
Keyboard Razer - Cynosa Chroma Wired Gaming Keyboard $49.99 @ Amazon
Mouse Redragon - COBRA M711 Wired Optical Mouse $19.89 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1306.80
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-12 00:24 EDT-0400

I left the keyboard untouched! If you are interested in a mechanical keyboard, here a couple of options:

Tenkeyless: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/bQTrxr/redragon-k561-visnu-wired-gaming-keyboard-k561

Full size: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/vknG3C/redragon-k551-rgb-vara-wired-standard-keyboard-k551-rgb-vara

Forum Topic "Dedicated streaming pc"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 10 days ago

For a 1080p 60fps dedicated streaming rig, the I5-4690k + 8GB RAM is more than adequate.

Since it's an older chip i'm assuming these are used parts. Whether used/new, whats he charging for everything included? You mentioned 8 or 16 GB - 8 is sufficient for this type of workload, 16 would be nice if achieved on the cheapie for future proofing or opening up additional opportunities in the long run.

I would need to supply a gpu if necessary

For a streaming rig, it's not necessary. The integrated GPU on the i5 will do the job.

Forum Topic "Need Some Opinions On Different Parts..."

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 11 days ago

Ah peripherals!


Mouse:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ggbkcf/corsair-mouse-ch9300011na

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/kJM323/logitech-mouse-910004615

Or a wireless option: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/wrZ2FT/logitech-g703-black-wireless-optical-mouse-910-005091


KEYBOARD: (mechanical keyboards)

Backlit but non-RGB options:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/CqGj4D/logitech-g413-carbon-wired-gaming-keyboard-920-008300

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/RHBrxr/azio-keyboard-mgk1k

RGB Options:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/J3dxFT/corsair-strafe-rgb-mk2-wired-gaming-keyboard-ch-9104110-na

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/KW4NnQ/corsair-keyboard-ch9101014na


I'm going to stop there!

The options are ridiculously many, and I must confess, my experiences are extremely limited to basic operable devices with decent quality (in other words I don't pay much attention to peripherals). You're 100% more likely to receive better recommendations with newer offerings, features, performance-bearings, value and build-quality from a variety of other user enthusiasts on PCPP.

Todays peripherals offer far more than your older plug-n-play clickity-clicks. Take for example or especially the keyboard - there are various lighting styles, a variety of key-switch types, software affiliations and features, key cap materials, keyboards with abundant media macro keys and keyboards with none, full sized keyboards, tenkeyless or compact keyboards, rubber dome non-mechanical keys, mechanical keys, or hybrid topre switches, etc etc etc. I'm pretty basic hence not bothered with all the mish-mash and opted for a £80 Logitech non-RGB cherry Mx brown G610 keyboard (I do fancy the tactile nature of mechanical keyboards). That was purchased 2/3 years ago alongside my G203 Prodigy mouse and Kingston HyperX Cloud II headset. These were certainly not the best offerings at the time (although great quality and durability with zero regrets) but were on par with personal preferences and budget.

To get the best for your money (assuming you have sizeable budget for the peripherals too) > https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/forums/ and under the Hardware section target each of the peripheral forums and ask for recommendations. Make sure to mention your budget, personal preference and any features you may be seeking. Youtube is full of product reviews, hence it's always a good idea to search those recommendations for a little more immersed info before pulling the trigger. Some of the these online reviews are excellent, pointing out a number of a pros/cons which usually go unnoticed from product listings/recommendations.

Forum Topic "I Don't Know Anything At All"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 12 days ago

For $1500 you can secure a very nice build for 1080p high refresh rate gaming

  • The display added is FreeSync enabled and works with Gsync too with Nvidias latest driver patch

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9600K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $268.00 @ SuperBiiz
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $31.99 @ Newegg Business
Motherboard ASRock - Z390 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $139.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.95 @ Adorama
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING OC Video Card $379.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Monitor MSI - Optix MAG24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $224.99 @ Walmart
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1509.86
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-09 19:47 EST-0500

For $2000, gaming on a larger and sharper image 1440p gaming panel paired with a superior GTX 2080 GPU is possible.

  • Gsync display added

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $199.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI - X470 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard $134.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $79.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.95 @ Adorama
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING AMP Video Card $739.99 @ Newegg Business
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Monitor Dell - S2716DG 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $453.59 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1993.36
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-09 19:51 EST-0500

If overclocking is of interest, a beefier cooler is recommended + 650W PSU + possibly a slightly more premium mid-tier mobo for best results.

Forum Topic "First PC (need opinions)"

LIVE_AMMO 2 points 12 days ago

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $268.50 @ shopRBC
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX AM4 Motherboard $169.99 @ Memory Express
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $114.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $90.75 @ shopRBC
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB OC Video Card $379.00 @ Canada Computers
Power Supply Corsair - CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Canada Computers
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1103.22
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-09 15:39 EST-0500

Faster RAM is vital with Ryzen chips.

If you are comfortable at the $1100 mark take the GTX 1660 TI and a slightly faster 2600X CPU with a B450 wifi integrated mobot (incl. 2 antennas). The main reason for opting for the 2600X is for the beefier stock cooler included which itself is worth $20/$30 + some added clockspeed uplift.

The GPU choice is obvious - outperforms the RX 580 with 25% added gaming performance. If your display is locked at 60hz (1080p), you might fancy saving some money as the RX 580 is more than adequate at that range. Although its a given the 1660 TI does make the better go-to solution for up and coming games/short-term future proofing whilst maintaining higher in-game configurations for best quality/performance.

If you have a case already, you'll want to double check whether it supports standard ATX sized motherboards. Or are you looking to secure a new case too?

(pardon the EDIT! corrected some odd errors)

Forum Topic "Need Some Opinions On Different Parts..."

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 12 days ago

I originally selected a Gigabyte Z390 AORUS ULTRA ATX LGA1151 Motherboard but in your setup, you selected a ASRock - Z390 Taichi ATX LGA1151 Motherboard. Is this just your pick of Motherboards or is there something wrong with the Gigabyte Z390 AORUS ULTRA ATX LGA1151?

Absolutely nothing wrong with it, both boards are simply fantastic, full of features and offer more than adequate power phases and VRM cooling for overclocking. If you prefer Gigabyte for the aesthetics, go for it, it's only $20/$30 more.

I'm keeping my main drive as a M.2-2280 Solid State Drive where I'll install Windows, etc. but I think I will add on a 3.5" drive for everything else I want to store such as games, etc.

The drive added in the previous recommendation is a M.2-2280 and also NVME with double the capacity @ 1TB. M.2-2280 is accessible by both SATA-interface and NVME-interface SSDs. The HP selection is a go between fast SATA speeds and superior NVME speeds, and comes in at a very attractive price point to secure 1TB. Plenty of space to throw in your games library to benefit from faster game load times.

A new display is going to be added to the list soon and I was looking at the following:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/fBvbt6/acer-predator-x34-340-3840x1440-120hz-monitor-x34-pbmiphzx

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/vhkwrH/asus-monitor-rogswiftpg348q

Nice!! I was wandering whether your GPU selection was overkill for the intended resolution, hence the query. With these panels at play, those doubts have been eliminated by a long shot! Gorgeous panels! I'm considering a similar move towards the end of 2019 (if the wife permits hehe)

Unless there is something flat screen LED TV out there that's just as good and cheaper...

Nope, with ultra-widescreen resolutions, curved panels make sense with an added touch of immersive game-play. I wouldn't have it any other way.

This is now looking to be a solid gaming platform!

Forum Topic "Opinions wanted thanks"

LIVE_AMMO 1 point 12 days ago

It's a nice build. Drop the i-variant of the H500 case and you'll be good to go. The i-variant internal fan hub locks you into NZXTs CAM software which is as buggy as an open window on a hot summer night.

Any changes that would be worth it without increasing the cost?

An aftermarket cooler would help. Only 20 quid more: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/Gqp323/cryorig-cpu-cooler-m9a

As Gilroar suggests, the newer RTX 2060 GPU! These cards outperform the 1070's, are newer, faster VRAM and offer a couple of additional features for a splash of added performance and improved visual quality (although not fully operational as game devs are yet to fall in pursuit)

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