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Comment reply on Forum Topic "MSI Mag upgrade from a Gigabyte aorus pri wifi"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

The board I have has great reviews, he heh.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen gaming PC - help needed"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey Shady, no worries :)

I know what you mean about research sinking in, it's like learning an other language almost!

One of the reasons I put in the 2060 SUPER was that it is the least expensive card that fits your wants/needs for gameplay, giving you a build you can order right now at the lowest price-point currently.

In the long run it would save you money to wait until summer (3080/3070 penciled in for a June/July release after a tech demo next month at a conference apparently). Rumours are a 50-75% performance increase at a similar/lower price point optimistically. I'm personally quite hyped for the 30XX series and look forward to what they can offer.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "confused about expansion slots on Aorus ULTRA x570"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Some M.2 sata slots on cheaper motherboards will "share" a SATA data lane with one of the SATA plugs on the motherboard. In more recent motherboards NVMe M.2 slots may share a data lane with a PCIe slot. So if these slots are both populated by peripherals, then they have to share a single data bus and therefore operate slower than they would if only one item was using the data bus.

For day to day use, the data rate will probably appear unaffected and you won't notice, but for more demanding use you might notice longer loading times etc.

This is why cheaper boards can afford to charge so much less, there is less infrastructure on the board to pay for in the first place.

To conclude, cheaper boards are cheaper for a reason, but unless you intend to do high-end use, big photo/render/database work, or bleeding-edge gaming at high speeds and resolutions, you probably won't notice the difference.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Needed for the PC build under US $950"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey there, before I continue, what do you want to do with your PC? What is your budget. If you had to compromise with what you are using your PC for, what is more important to you?

this i think is your current component list yes?

What parts do you already have apart from your HDD? What power supply do you have? What kind of monitor and connection does it have?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which CPU cooler do you suggest?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

AIO coolers are quite niche, generally better off maintenance and cash wise just getting some good case fans and a conventional cooler. I know, I know, the concept and aesthetics of the AIO kits are nice, but you're throwing money at a gimmick that would be better spent elsewhere.

If you do have your heart set on an AIO, try for a 140mm rad and set it up to blow out of the top of the case:

case

fan ^

radiator

fan ^


That should compliment with the natural heat exhaust rising. Then have a couple of 140mm fans set up to draw air in through the front and/or bottom of the tower. and an other fan, probably a 120mm drawing air out of the back of the case too.

Assuming you would be going for an NZXT AIO, then you're looking at spending an other $150-200 depending exactly what/where you buy at a glance.

You're on the right track for conventional coolers if the massive heat-fin monsters of downward facing coolers don't appeal to you. However with these "fanwich" coolers bear in mind they are generally more noisy that other coolers as there is less heat-dissipation, they are more reliant on air flow for cooling. It might be worth investigating some of the "be quiet!", "Cooler Master" and "Noctua" offerings too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen gaming PC - help needed"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey there.

So WRT PCIe 3.0 and 4.0. There are a handfull of situations that have occured recently where top-spec machines have maxed out a PCIe 3.0 slot's speed. PCIe 4.0 is 4x faster than 3.0. The only PCIe 4.0 GPUs at the moment are the most recent ATI cards. At the moment Intel chipsets and motherboards do not support it, and there are currently no nVidia PCIe 4.0 graphics cards. The speeds for passing data cross a 4.0 slot will allow for faster data processing in peripherals that use the slots such as workstation GPUs or things that make use of the CUDA cores on a nVidia GPU like photo editing, analytics etc. Unless you are using a nvidia titan or a 2080Ti for comuputing problems or maybe really high FPS high resolution gaming, then technically 4.0 is overkill by a large margin.

That said, future 4.0 hardware will probably be 3.0 compatible to appeal to people just wanting to upgrade their card rather than a whole system refresh, but with the advance of processing power in GPUs coming this year i think it's better to be safe than sorry, and not risk missing out on the full capability of future cards coming in the next few generations.

WRT faster SSd connections, you have picked an M.2 NVMe SSD, basically the fasted bulk storage solution available at the moment. Some older boards use the same data channel for M.2 or SATA connections as their PCIe connections,meaning that using all the slots would actually negatively effect the speed of prehipherals on the motherboard, this should not be a problem with the MoBo I have selected.

WRT RAM Speeds, there are two things, the operating frequency (3000, 3200, and 3600 for example), and the switching speed. Without going into the nitty gritty, switching speeds can make 3600 RAM slower than 3200 RAM, but generally the difference in performance is not noticeable and only applies to specific/niche user cases. For gaming and light editing, faster is better.

Going from 3000 to 3200 is a 5.6% increase in speed, whereas going from 3200 to 3600 is just over a 12% increase in speed. (going from 3000 to 3600 ram would be a 20% increase in speed). Please note that these are rough and raw figures, as different frequency ram will usually have different clocking speeds as mentioned, changing the actual gain in speed/power.

As long as you CPU, chipset and MoBo can support the RAM speed then definitely look at the 3600 option, although your performance with the two sticks of 3200 will still be amazing for what you want, and if you were to drop to 3000 RAM to save a little money, the loss in performance would not be huge/noticeable for day-to-day use.

I hope that makes sense

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ryzen gaming PC - help needed"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey there Shady.

If you take a look at this and let me know how you feel about it. I realise we've added a little more cost on but let me explain.

For AMD MoBos the x570 chipset is the most recent, and supports PCIe 4.0 which is currently not being widely used, but might become more important with upcoming developments in GPU and storage technologies. Additionally it is the only PCIe 4.0 chipset available. You won't have to bork around and worry about trying to load a compatible BIOS for your Ryzen 3 CPU (great choice by the way, the 3700X is going to give you years of use before starting to show it's age). I also added thermal paste.

With the new MoBo I added a cheap but entirely serviceable WiFi card for you.

I downgraded the GPU to a 2060 super as the performance is almost identical (roughly a 5% drop in some circumstances), and saves money and power draw for now. When you get around to upgrading the GPU, this should give you the biggest bang for bucks and noticeable change in performance.

finally I added a better power supply. If your intentions are to upgrade, then the PSU should be able to take on the demands of even a 2080 Ti or more power hungry AMD GPU. Current trends indicate that the 30xx generation of Nvidia GPUs will be more power efficient too.

Picked out a slightly cheaper set of RAM, and a slightly cheaper ATX mid case to try and shave some cost off.

This setup should give you great gameplay at 1080p 144hz or 1440p at 60Hz, and has plenty of scope for future upgrades including memory, storage, GPUs etc.

Happy gaming o/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Ampere Specifications"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Hype intensifies. Grabbing a 3070 for 2070 super prices would make me very happy.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "[first build][feedback and advice requested]Gaming and editing AMD mATX build"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks again for the feedback, after a non-trivial shuffle around the setup has changed case and fans, GPU, CPU cooler, storage, PSU, and RAM.

I'm more than happy with the performance the 3700X will give me, but have taken the feedback on RAM onboard, opting for two sticks of corsair vengeance 16GB 3600 RAM.

All in all the changes have knocked on about £40 to the build. Not too shabby.

I guess with the 2070 super this is no longer an AMD build P: On the upside my comfort zone is placated as I am a fan of the Geforce Experience software and how easy it makes my gaming life. The oly changes that could happen are adding a second GPU, and re working the storage solution. That and a PSU upgrade as more stuff gets put in the case too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I change case?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

https://pcpartpicker.com/products/case/#y=8200000,8200094,8200062&f=2&X=9065,10980

for expansion slots, the https://pcpartpicker.com/product/y8h9TW/phanteks-case-phes614pwt phantex has a lot of room for expansion, in a full sized ATX case.

Otherwise the NZXT or coolermaster are nice mid sized ATX towers that should meet your needs.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "[first build][feedback and advice requested]Gaming and editing AMD mATX build"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Had a look at my useage and a sit down think, tweaked down the NVMe to 1.5TB, and added a secong 2TB SSd, more than enough memory and all fast for me. I can tweak and add stuff to my hearts content after the build, but this will be more than enough for me for the near future at the very least, and serve my purposes very well.

500GB NVMe for OS and software, 1TB NVME for high use games, a 3TB SSD for storage and media, and an other 2TB for what won't fit on the NVMe storage.

Thank you so much for your input :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "[first build][feedback and advice requested]Gaming and editing AMD mATX build"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

just ran some sums on the fan flow rates. Assuming we just run the two 140mm fans to run air into the case and we have a perfect outflow matching the supply from them, then you're displacing enough air every second to fill the case just over 3.6 times! no wonder it would be "a little louder"(tm) hehehe. I realise we would never match this performance, but wow, that seems like a little overkill to me.

I think I'll look as the fan stuff a little more closely myself, but having looked into the Meshify C, it's a much better case and definitely more futureproof, thank you so much for that recommendation, and the GPU looks great too.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "[first build][feedback and advice requested]Gaming and editing AMD mATX build"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll look into the RAM, and after a little enlightenment in an other thread realise I'll get a little more efficiency from a larger PSU. I was looking at the meshify case but like the aesthetics of this one. However in the interests of feedback from above and more heat living in the case, i think it would be better to change to the meshify.

Thanks for your feedback

Comment reply on Forum Topic "[first build][feedback and advice requested]Gaming and editing AMD mATX build"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

some great stuff here, thanks for pointing out the cheaper NVMe SSDs.

Form factor is because the study it will be going in is small and a compact case can be put just about anywhere i can make room for it. Also hence the quieter fans.

The 2070S and more oompf-y fans are something I'll take a good look at too.

I have spades for hands and prefer larger mouses, so I think I'll keep the darkcore, but will take on what you said about the keyboard. Probably change it up for a Logitech plank.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I change case?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Is there anything in particular you're after like Colour, side panel etc? same price or is there stretch in your budget?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Should I change case?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

"Keep your components cool with room for up to 6x 120mm fans, 4x 140mm fans, or up to a 360mm* radiator in the front."

Straight from the corsair website bud, assuming the GPU radiator is a 360mm rad and not a 420mm beast.

Looking at others who have used the case, some have commented it is on the small side for mid towers and that this can cause some compatibility issues with overlap.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First ever pc build tell me how bad I did"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry you're absolutely right, I had some other figures stuck in my head earlier. I do stand by the point that they need the extra 4 pin output though for the MoBo.

@Jeraco, sorry about the confusion.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming Build - Anything That I Should Cut Back on?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/GjhBzN

it's a little more expensive than your list but I found a PSU with the same efficiency rating and the required supplies for your MOBO, saved some money on the NVME SSDs, and the GPU I picked out is a bit pricier but also has higher clock and boost speeds.

If your heart is set on 1440p 60fps then the 2080 SUPER should give you years of gameplay.

Is there anything else you would like me to look at?I think you could easily take a downgrade on the CPU and still have a great rig, also going down to 3200 RAM would cost a tiny bit of performance but save some money.

Oh also, if you want more easy liquid cooling, the Aorus GPU has an integrated AIO radiator and fan setup version for $70 more, but haven't checked the size or if it would be compatible with your case.

::EDIT::

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/ZBWP8M with a downgraded but still potent CPU, and the watercooled 2080 super GPU. Less than $10 more than your original build :D

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming Build - Anything That I Should Cut Back on?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

An other thing I've noticed is down in your warnings, your PSU doesn't have the extra 4-pin power supply the MOBO "needs". This could cause performance problems or even crashes as the extra power is usually needed for handling things like high-power GPUs like the 2080 super. give me a little time and I'll tweak the build and we can see what you think.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming Build - Anything That I Should Cut Back on?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Dude the higher-end 2080 cards are basically aimed at/designed for top-spec 4K gaming at high refresh rates.

A 2080 super on a UW1440 screen should net you 60fps with loads of headroom left, in fact bringing the fps down to 60 will probable let you run higher graphics settings too.

The only reason to go with the Ti over the super is future-proofing if you want to run multiple UW monitors or 4K screens with all the settings turned up to 11.

Plenty of fans and cooling, the AIO CPU cooler should even let you overclock if you want. Plus it's a hefty CPU so no bottle-necking there.

The only thing it you're rocking 2.5TB of storage, will your OS and games all fit on the M.2 SSD? That's the only area in the build that really raises an eyebrow for me.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First ever pc build tell me how bad I did"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

All looks good on first glance, good processor, mobo, RAM and GPU, the AIO cooler should support some overclocking and also help your case keep cool by piping the heat straight out the top.

That and the three included fans to draw air in should give you a cool case and positive pressure too. if you're set on this particular setup and want to save a little money and/or improve the efficiency it might be worth considering a lower wattage PSU. 750W with an estimated draw of less than 500W is some stupendous overkill.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC Suddenly Freeze/Restart"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Definitely check all of your power cables, and maybe check all your interface slots too.

Might be a pinched cable too with poor continuity.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions On First PC Build for Gaming, Photo/Video Editing, and 3D Modeling."

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

For an editing heavy setup, it may be worth considering doing a big shuffle to an Intel based setup with triple channel memory, this would yield a more noticeable performance boost than going for incrementally faster components with a big price increase.

An other thing to consider is that both intel and AMD have solutions where you can use an SSD as a cache for an HDD. This means for your editing, your system can cache your big files and speed up your workflow, whilst still using the HDD for bulk storage.

Finally, you have a beastly, power hungry CPU dumping all its heat into your case, you should consider some fans to keep the air moving inand out of the case, or perhaps an AIO (all in one) liquid CPU cooler and radiator kit to keep your CPU purring along happily.

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