add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Hey everyone, was wondering if someone could look over my parts list

SlicezAtTheSky

2 months ago

Ive been waiting to build a PC for awhile but am now at a point where i actually can build it. I was hoping someone could look over the build i have set up and critique it. My main worry is the CPU cooler as it is air cooled. I prefer it to be air cooled because that seems like less of a hassle but just want to be sure itll keep the CPU cool. I also want to be sure that the giant cooler will fit into the case which im pretty sure it will because the case i picked is pretty big. I also just want general feedback as it is my first time buidling a PC so pointing out anything that i might have missed will be greatly appreciated. Thanks everyone! https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/list/C9Q68M

Comments

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

Air coolers (which are technically liquid cooled) present zero cause for concern and function just as good as liquid AIO coolers. The only hurdle being "case compatibility" which isn't a problem with the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M. If interested, the D15 is now also available in black: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/84MTwP/noctua-nh-d15-chromaxblack-8252-cfm-cpu-cooler-nh-d15-chromaxblack

The selected cooler suggests you're planning on overclocking the CPU. For this purpose the Z390M motherboard from MSI makes for a poor selection and only moderately scales with overclocking. Also, you've got a standard sized ATX case and a MICRO-ATX motherboard. Although compatible, the shorter board sits higher up on the cases's back-wall which exposes attached cables at the bottom and just makes things a little less attractive through the glass panel.

You'll want to look past the 1000-series GPUs from NVIDIA for their newer GEN RTX 2000-SERIES cards. The 1080 TI is overpriced whereby the RTX 2080 SUPER (same performance) is achievable for around $900-$1000 CAD

A better quality PSU would be in order too.


If desired, for an amended parts list help us with the following:

  1. Purpose of use? (gaming/streaming/editing/rendering/etc)

  2. If gaming, what display resolution and refresh rate are you targeting? (eg. 1080p 144hz)

  3. Are you planning on overclocking?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

So the main plan for this rig is gaming for sure. However, id like to be able to do 3D modeling on it for work but considering my 6 year old laptop can handle that I assumed it would be fine here. I plan on running this with 144 Hz and the highest resolution it can handle. I had planned on overclocking a bit to boost the CPU.

the Mobo I posted is a standard ATX as far as i can see though. Can you go into more detail about the how it might not be the best for overclocking and maybe recommend a better Mobo?

edit: also can you explain a bit how the 2080 super is better than the 1080 ti? is it better to go for a faster GPU with a lower memory? How will the difference effect gaming?

thanks so much!

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

For gaming only @ 1080p (or 1440p) 144hz + overclocking potential, the 9700K is perfect! Assuming your 6-year old laptop delivers desirable performance for 3D modelling, with certainty the 9700K will have you covered there. For 3D modelling, the RTX CARDs rendering engine will smash those workloads into pieces. Plenty of performance here!!

the Mobo I posted is a standard ATX as far as i can see though. Can you go into more detail about the how it might not be the best for overclocking and maybe recommend a better Mobo?

Thats so odd! I swear I saw a Micro-ATX MSI Z390M. Maybe got muddled up with another opened parts list.

I would also avoid the MSI Z390-A PRO. It's an entry level motherboard with a poorer VRM cooling solution and again will limit power address in 150w category. A decent board for overclocking should easily draw 200W of power without performance throttle with good quality mosfets and sufficient HS cooling.

For a moderately decent affordable overclocking solution, something like this: https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/CdPKHx/gigabyte-z390-gaming-x-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-gaming-x

Otherwise a more robust solution to push the CPU to a more rewarding overclock - the following 2 will do. I currently have the Asrock Taichi which is simply brilliant in all respects. Not the best UI at the BIOS-level (least friendly) but very easy to get the hang of.

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/MVPKHx/gigabyte-z390-aorus-pro-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-aorus-pro

https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/product/TnhKHx/asrock-z390-taichi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-taichi

edit: also can you explain a bit how the 2080 super is better than the 1080 ti? is it better to go for a faster GPU with a lower memory? How will the difference effect gaming?

There's a bunch of reasons you might fancy the 2080 super:

  1. Most plausibly "cost". Older generation hardware which performs at equal balance, if achieved more affordably, becomes a viable solution. For a $300 mark-up in cost with inferior performance, simply put it's a rip-off. For this sort of money you would be better-off targeting a RTX 2080 TI which sees 20-30% game performance or workload render gains. At this point the 1080 TI only makes sense if it's achievable for $40+ less below the RTX 2080 SUPERs asking price.

  2. Nvidias newer RTX cards deploy ray tracing as an added bonus. If you're a gamer and fancy those more realistic video lit-up environments "ray tracing" would be a difficult one to pass-up. At the moment only a few select games support RT, others are lining up and the future is geared up on the ray-traced path.

  3. RTX cards employ "faster GDDR6" VRAM which compensates the drop from 11GB. The 1080 TI remains on GDDR5. Only a handful of poorly optimised games may fancy higher memory bandwidths but only see a few FPS gains (a negligible return). Whereas in general the RTX 2080 SUPER sees a 5%-15% gain in gaming performance which is vastly significant considering it's the newer and relatively the more affordable GPU. Later RTX code optimisations capped the performance bar higher hence older benchmarks may be misleading as the RTX card is shown in various screens as only favouring a 3%-10% performance lead. If you are intending on viewing online benchmarks make sure to search "2080 super" which is the revised variant from the initial "2080" standard model.

  4. Simply put, it's the better and newer GPU.

BTW - if the budget isn't of concern and you simply want the best gaming GPU for higher resolution gaming (1440p/4K), there is the rather expensive RTX 2080 TI option. Personally i'd avoid it and grab the 2080 Super and look for an earlier upgrade path in a few years (or earlier as GPU's maintain decent re-sale value) for a more robust performance-savvy newer GEN card (eg. RTX 3000 GPUs are expected in 2020)

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

thank you so much for taking the time to write this out! incredibly informative and helpful

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm glad I could be of help.

Feel free to ask if you have any further queries.

  • 2 months ago
  • 2 points

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $465.25 @ Vuugo
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler $99.95 @ Newegg Canada Marketplace
Motherboard MSI Z390-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $159.99 @ Amazon Canada
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $169.99 @ Memory Express
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $130.62 @ shopRBC
Storage Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $64.95 @ Vuugo
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB BLACK GAMING Video Card $929.00 @ Canada Computers
Case Phanteks Enthoo Pro M TG ATX Mid Tower Case $161.99 @ Amazon Canada
Power Supply Corsair TXM Gold 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $119.88 @ Canada Computers
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2301.62
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-11-17 13:28 EST-0500

Newer GPU

better PSU

Cheaper HDD

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

thanks so much for the input!

can you explain your reasoning for going with a 2080 over a 1080 ti? is it better to go faster with lower memory?

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

it's actually the newer 2080S

the 2080S is slightly ahead as well: https://gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvidia-RTX-2080S-Super-vs-Nvidia-GTX-1080-Ti/4050vs3918

And $300+ cheaper, since the 1080 Ti is EOL.

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube