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Remote Desktop Video Editing

Creatorbros3

1 month ago

Hello,

I built a workstation desktop for 4K video editing and I am now looking for mobile solutions for video editing. Obviously the best solution is to get a beefy laptop to edit with, but I don't have the budget for that right now. So, I was wondering if it is feasible to somehow connect my desktop (via wifi) to a cheap laptop and edit remotely off of it.

If that is possible, how would one go about setting up a system like that? What might be the issues with something like that?

Just for reference, I edit with DaVinci Resolve (which is primarily GPU powered). The footage is 4K-100mbps.

Thank you in advance!

Comments

  • 1 month ago
  • 4 points

The big challenge you're going to run into is getting the footage from where you're at back to your editing rig. It will have to be local on the editing rig for you to manipulate it.

If the footage is 100Mbps, and your hotel wifi throttles you to 10Mbps, then it's going to take 10 seconds per 1 second of footage to send the recorded footage back to HQ for editing.

So first you have to solve that problem.... Some remote desktop tools support file transfers, but keep in mind that while the remote desktop session is open, bandwidth is being used for the session, so this isn't the best way to deliver data.

Syncronizing the data with onedrive, or another cloud based solution is probably easiest and fastest. because both ends get a "cloud based" middle man to set things in motion requiring no specialized network configuration on your part. Configure onedrive to download all files on your desktop by disabling files on demand. I use onedrive as the example here due to familiarity, but there are many other services that work similarly that could broker this data drop. Google Drive, Dropbox, etc.

A more complex but more direct data transfer, would involve setting up a VPN or port forward for a file server configuration hosted from your home computer. VPN is preferred IMO as it provides opportunity for multiple layers of protection (have to authenticate to the VPN, potentially with both a password and key, as well as authenticate to the computer on the network.

Assuming you are willing to wait to transfer the footage, there are a number of ways to do remote desktop, starting with traditional remote desktop services that require that your desktop computer at home operate as a remote desktop "server" of sorts. This would require hosting a VPN capability for you to "tunnel" home to and initiate a remote desktop connection through using the native remote desktop function in Windows. Alternatively, a port-forward on your router for incoming remote desktop session requests (not as secure).

Alternatively, there are now many remote desktop tools on the market that use a cloud based intermediary, so that we don't require any special network configuration. Both ends appear to their local firewalls, to be initiating "outgoing" connections to the cloud man-in-the-middle. You will have to configure the machine you want to connect to, to not go to sleep, and run the "agent" software required to initiate the connection prior to setting out on your voyage, but once the software is configured it should be very easy to use.

These "easier" cloud solutions are available free from some sources, like google, and paid from others, like LogMeIn. I believe "gotomypc" is based on the same remote desktop tech that we use at work (rescue assist) for remote work.

In all examples, having a good, low latency, high bandwidth connection between the machines is required for reasonable levels of productivity on basic desktops.

I suspect whatever differences there are from one solution to the next will be academic. I don't think ANY of them will work well for editing video from afar. In my experience these solutions are just to clunky. It's fine for troubleshooting a problem, clicking on stuff that is stationary, but video editing over the large lag introduced by these connections would be very annoying. Imagine hitting the "play" button, only to have it take about a second before it starts to play, then getting a very garbled looking video stream of the playback because it can only send a limited amount of detail through the stream. The more motion, the lower the quality gets. Then hit stop, and again, a second or so for it to respond. It would be really hard to perform those fast play/stop/splice/cut/etc operations when chopping up footage into usable clips. It would also be difficult to identify what parts of the clips are worth keeping (is it in focus? is it blurry because of the remote desktop or because the lens was out of focus on the original?)... See this gets messy.....


My advise.... Keep your eye out for a good laptop... We bought one of these for someone at work recently....

Omen by HP 2019 15-Inch Gaming Laptop....

Intel i7-9750H Processor, NVIDIA GTX 1660Ti 6 GB, 8 GB RAM, 256 GB SSD, Windows 10 Home (15-dc1020nr, Black).

It was about $1K on amazon. We opened it up and installed 32GB RAM, a 1TB SSD, and upgraded to WinPro.

Worked out to ~$1450 all said and done. Powerhouse portable with a cool red keyboard and BIG power adapter (200W) and pretty good internal cooling. No doubt this machine would edit video pretty well.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Wow! Thank you for that wealth of information! I will look into some of these solutions. I have Norton for my desktop and it has a VPN included with my service, so that might work as far as the VPN stuff was concerned.

My plan is to get a really powerful laptop as soon as possible, it is just going to be out of my budget for a while. Mainly looking for one with that dedicated GPU (like what you mentioned above) so that DaVinci Resolve runs good on it (DaVinci is primarily GPU powered).

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I have just started a similar thread. From my research, casting seems to only work at 1080p. (Do you mean 100fps, because frame rates also tend to be low?)

There might be some wireless HDMI solution with a transmitter and receiver that has high resolution and frame rates, but that would be at the high end of the spectrum...

I hope this is of some help but I still find this very confusing.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

More looking for a solution for remote editing (like linking to my computer from another state to be able to edit while traveling long distance). Thank you for the input. What is casting? All I am needing is something to let me view the screen remotely and control the peripherals (mouse and keyboard).

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Allan did an amazing job of answering your question above, but just to answer your above questions... Casting is where you view your desktop onto a remote display. There are hardware options if you are close - within a few metres. Otherwise you could remotely access and control your desktop from your hotel room, but the lag, resolution and frame rate wouldn't be good. That is just an software thing, but I think you would have to be at your main computer to approve remote access anyway.

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