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Is it safe to plug in an extension cord INTO the Powerline passthrough socket?

Salim8

1 month ago

https://www.amazon.co.uk/TL-PA7010PKIT-Passthrough-Powerline-Streaming-Configuration/dp/B06VW1WCCD/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=powerline+adaptor+av1000&qid=1571081073&s=computers&sr=1-1

Thinking of getting the Powerline adapter above, but I'm wondering if it would be safe for me to do that. I will plug the Powerline directly into the wall socket, and then want to plug an extension cord into the Powerline.. The extension cord will have a 1440p 144hz monitor attached, speakers, and two phones charging cables. Also for the other Powerline adapter (that will connect to the router) I want to attach an extension cable which will have the TV, router, and TV Box connected to it.. Will this be safe to do? The Powerline says it can do 16A but I don't know if that's a lot or not? Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

16 amps at UK voltage is quite a bit, about 3500 watts. If the 16 amp figure is correct, I don't think you have to worry unless you plug a few toasters into it and turn them all on at once. Also, most ordinary indoor extension cords are rated for less than 16 amps, so you don't want to come too close to that figure anyway.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Alright, will order and hopefully should be fine. Thanks!

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/guidance/safety-around-the-home/home-appliances-ratings/

TV and a monitor are gonna be fine. the router, phone charging, and TV box will barely be noticeable.

main things that draw a lot are things that heat up stuff quickly. (stove, microwave, iron, vaccuum, etc) The amp figures are probably for usa, but it'll still give you an idea of what things actually draw a lot of power.

Do make sure the extension cord is rated for something at least somewhat decent just to be safe.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

By rated do you mean if it's something like Surge protected or whatever (mine says something liked that)?

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

rated as in wire size (gauge). The extension should list either an amps rating or a wire gauge such as 14, 16, 18 and you can look up the amps rating from the wire gauge.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Oh okay, will check thanks.

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

basically just not something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Uninex-AC04WHTNV-Household-Extension-Sliding/dp/B01N30KNC9/ref=sr_1_54?crid=D4FKR8PNCD74&keywords=short+extension+cord+3+foot&qid=1571152008&sprefix=short+extension+cord+1+foot%2Caps%2C186&sr=8-54

which that might still actually be ok ish...

For what you're going to be running, any 3 prong cord that feels not super small is going to be fine.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Yeah mine just looks like any other normal cord and seems to be fine

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