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Overclock or Not

adeoluy2k

7 months ago

Just completed my first build and wondering is it worth the stress to overclock your cpu gpu and ram for the extra horsepower.......doing research i found out that overclocking your cpu technically voids your warranty[message shown when the amd mastertool is downloaded]

I have cooler master hyper 212 rgb cooler

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

On Ryzen overclocking really doesn't get You anywhere noticeable usually lower single digit gains on models like the 2600/2700 and can even cost performance on the 2600X/2700X.

Things like tweaking memory speeds and timings give You better overall gains.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

i have 2600 and a vega 56 what would you recommend

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

That's up to You.

Both benefit more from memory tweaking then a core overclock.

So that is where I would focus.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

thank you now to figure out how to do that

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

CPU overclocking is done via the bios and so is RAM overclocking. if you dont know where the bios is, then chances are that you havent enabled XMP for the RAM anyway and that would be a good thing to do. usually, you can get into the bios of most boards by rapidly tapping or holding down the delete key. I generally dont recommend RAM overclocking beyond a little bit because it can get quite involved with all of the advanced timings. for me, I did overclock my RAM from its rated 3200mhz to 3600mhz at the same CL 16-18-18-36 timings and didnt change anything else. I have my CPU (i7-9700K) running at a decent 4.9ghz on all cores at 1.35v (i just kinda yolo-ed it and tried 1.35v and didnt really try to see if it worked at a lower voltage first... it probably would). I did need to adjust my memory voltage to 1.41v from 1.35v. This is something you probably should not have over 1.4v for an everyday overclock. same for CPU (ryzen or intel). Gilroar is right about the performance increase from memory --- its a lot more important on Ryzen, and Ryzen chips dont overclock very far. I did get my Ryzen 7 2700X at 4.4ghz, but it took too many volts to be worthwhile for a daily overclock. I recommend perhaps looking at some overclocking guides before attempting anything. GPU overclocking on the other hand is relatively straighforward for most cards. just download MSI afterburner and tweak away... theres not really anything in there that can harm your card. the voltage offsets are always too small to damage anything and everything else cant harm the card really. still, use common sense.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

as a noob at this i might just keep things simple i have a vega 56 and ryzen 2600 and 3200 ram

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Overclock the CPU yes you can get about a 5% performance gain just going to the 2600X speed, memory yes to at least 2933. Both of these can be overclocked in BIOS so if it fails you just reset CMOS and your right back to normal.

Video card I don't recommend because it has to be done with software and have seen people brick their card trying to push it to far.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends on your CPU and your PC usage for overclocking that. If you have ram around 3000-3200 it may not be worth the headache of overclocking it. For GPU it depends what GPU you have (for the built on cooler) and what resolution/framerate you are playing at. Say if you had an RTX 2070 and playing on a 1080p 144hz screen there is zero point in overclocking the GPU.

For CPU normally I would overclock and would go as high as thermals and voltages allow. Also there is that thing known as the silicon lotto. Some CPUs cannot be overclocked either (non k skew intels) so I wouldn't bother trying. For AMD on 2nd gen Ryzens XFR 2.0 sometimes can deliver better FPS on games compared to manual overclocking due to single core turbos going higher than all core OC and some games really capitalize the single core speed.

Basically should you OC or not is not always a cut and dry yes or no and depends on a lot of factors.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

i have 2600 and a vega 56 what would you recommend

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

For the GPU Toms Hardware outlines that when overclocking you can get some gain but power usage skyrockets. It can gain ~20% performance according to their tests but at double the power draw. Though that vega is about as powerful as the GTX 1070 ti so if you are gaming at 1080p 144hz the stock speed of that card should have no issues at that resolution. If running a 1440p (more than 60hz) display if you don't mind the extra power usage then sure you can OC to better handle your display. I use a GTX 1070 (non ti) myself and it runs a 144hz 1080p screen and does really well on that when not overclocked.

As for the CPU if gaming is all you are using it for use the XFR 2.0 as it should auto OC depending on thermals and does so per core. As stated before per core turbos on XFR sometimes hits higher than you can manually OC all cores too and that may be more beneficial to games. If it was a K skew intel I would wholeheartedly agree to overclock to a minimal of the max single core boost to all cores as Intel overclocking is not like AMD overclocking.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

im on ryzen 5 2600

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

I know, that is why I suggested to use XFR 2.0 as that is a feature of the 2nd gen Ryzens.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

how would i take advantage of xfr

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

They have zero idea if you overclocked or not and CPU's will last until they are well obsolete even with a overclock and it will only have a 3 year warranty anyways. Plus you can't even get to a dangerous level of voltage with your cooler on any decent CPU without running into thermal issues first.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

im on ryzen 5 2600

I have a 2600. It will boost to 3.9 for 3-5 cores depending. Over that core count slightly lower. So if you can set your overclock to 3.9 or above you gain a little, not much but a little.

I have my 2600 set to 3.9 at 1.2 volts. I can push it to 4.0 but have to bump the voltage to 1.4, and things get a little toasty for me at that voltage.

One thing you will find, is that if you can set an overclock with a decent voltage you don't get the higher temporary voltages you can get with letting the boost work on it's own.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

are settings universal or does everyone have to tune seperately im looking for the simplest way to overclock as i am very very very new to this

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

No they are not universal, each CPU is different. There are many Ryzen overclocking guides out there to go by. Here is the way I do it.

I use HWMonitor to keep and eye on temperature and voltages. I use Cinebench as a quick check the overclock and Prime95 as a validation of the overclock stability and temps. (Prime95 it will turn up the heat as it really stresses the CPU, watch the temps).

I start high and move down, instead of slowly working up. So for the 2600 4.0 GHz is about the max most get. So set the core clock to 4.0 and the voltage to 1.4V. AMD has said you can go as high 1.45V but it seems most people don't get much extra boost from over 1.4V.

Now you run Cinebench as make sure you get through the benchmark. If so, great. Now I would run Prime 95 and watch the temps. As long as you stay under 85C you are good. Some people say you have to run Prime95 for 24 hours to make sure a the overclock is stable. I have never done this. I have never seen a CPU give problems if it can make it through 2-3 test passes of Prime95, and that takes only a few minutes.

Now, if you crash at any point, or Prime95 gives errors it's time to reduce the core clock to 3.9 and try again. You can try 3.95 or some other in between if you want. Once fine a core clock that passes both tests, you can try and reduce the voltage and retest. The point is the find the highest clock with the lowest stable voltage.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

I've overclocked CPU's then returned them to the store lol.

To my knowledge, there's no way for Intel or AMD to know if you overclocked your processor unless you caused damage from excessive heat or too much voltage.

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