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Defender and malwarebytes, attack surface anti malware

Blankesteijn

8 months ago

I recently bought a new computer (with windows 10). And because I wanted to put a good anti virus programme on it I did some research. I mainly found that people recommended defender in combination with malwarebytes. Furthermore I also found that when you use an anti virus programme you increase your attack surface and when you don't (use an anti virus programme) you can't be hacked that way. And that with a less demanding one like defender the risk of that would still be small. I don't really understand that much of it, that's why I wanted to ask it on the forum. Does an anti malware programma also increase your attack surface (just like an anti virus) and thereby the chance to get hacked or to get a virus/malware? Until I came across the attack suface information I was thinking of using defender and malwarebytes (because of the recommendations I found). Do you think that would be a good idea? Does an anti malware programme, like malwarebytes, increase your attack surface? If you think it would be a good idea to use malwarebytes, would you recommend the free or the paid version?

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

most stuff comes now by ads etc. you be surprise how much ublock defeats those vectors

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

i dont think having a anti virus or anything would increase the chances of getting a virus. as long as you dont download stuff from shady website you should be fine. I use bitdefender because i got a free 6 month trial to it and it works fine. I would use malwarebytes free because you can do a scan on it and everytime I thought i had a virus and scanned my computer, it would fine what was a virus and delete it.

  • 8 months ago
  • 1 point

attack surface

Do you mean a vector or avenue of attack? Technically speaking, anything you put on your computer can be a potential attack vector. I don't off hand recall any instances of a reputable antimalware solution being exploited, however, and the overall risk of that happening is small. The benefit however is substantial, as there are many different exploits and malware programs out there which a good antimalware program should protect you from.

Free or paid malwarebytes

I don't recommend paying for malwarebytes. The free version is an excellent scanning tool that you can use every now and then to ensure nothing slipped past your primary program.

Windows Defender

It has gotten a lot better. However, there are free versions from reputable companies that are better than Windows Defender, and I still usually recommend them. Bitdefender's free version is unobtrusive and has excellent detection rates, or Kaspersky's free version has a few extra features. Those are a couple good ones to look into.

I don't really understand much of it

I'll try to keep this brief. Cybersecurity is only as strong as its weakest link. It starts with your behavior- don't plug in strange USBs from off the street, don't download sketchy attachments, that kind of thing. Antimalware programs (also colloquially known as antivirus these days) serve to block malicious programs. Any program can have a bad update or uncovered exploit that lets malicious actors gain access or install malware on your PC, so it's important to have an antimalware program, keep programs updated, and uninstall obsolete software or bloatware. In order to catch things that slip through your antimalware program, use a scanning tool (like Malwarebytes Free) from a different vendor- since the underlying engine and databases are different, what gets through one likely won't get through another. And in case of something catastrophic, from a nasty bit of ransomware to physical issues like fire or theft, keep regular backups stored in a safe location, such as an external hard drive that you put in a fireproof safe, or through a cloud backup service (although those can have their own security issues). There are also other things you can do, such as reputable browser extensions (Disconnect, HTTPS Everywhere, uBlock Origin, for example), ensuring you've secured your wifi network with a strong password and changed the router's admin password, and set up two factor authentication on accounts that support it.

Hopefully that gives you a bit better idea.

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