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Suggest a book

Dreadvolt

11 months ago

I just finished up Ready Player One this morning, and now I need something new to read, help me out please?

Typically I enjoy dark or gritty fantasy aimed at a more mature audience (A Song of Fire and Ice, Night Angel trilogy, The Nevernight Chronicles to name a few), but quite enjoyed Ready Player One which is a weird Sci-Fi/Fantasy mashup.

Anyway, I'm sure some people here must read things outside of their browser window.

WHATCHUGOT!?

Comments

  • 11 months ago
  • 5 points

I read anything written by Stephen King.

If you want something that last long, check out The Dark Tower saga. It's 7-8 books (depending on whether you include the last one -- Wind Through the Keyhole --, which was added later and covers a story around the middle of the whole saga). The total number of pages is around 5000+. Should keep you going for a week. :)

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I've been meaning to try tackling this for a while, and just never seem to come back to it. Thanks for reminding me!

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

The dark tower series is good, but it ties into some of his other works. In particular you will probably get more out of it if you read "The Stand" first.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Haven't read Dark Tower but I have read The Shining, and it was excellent (and spooky).

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

Sci-fi? One of my favorite sci-fi authors is Jules Verne: maybe you should check out some of his stuff.

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

'The Wheel of Time' by Robert Jordan is a fantasy epic that will keep you busy for a very long time. It's not as "gritty" as A Song of Ice and Fire, but it is a very intricate world with hundreds of characters, a cool magic system, and rich history. The books are massive and the writing is quite descriptive.

'Mistborn' by Brandon Sanderson, although I've only read the first book of the series, is very good.

If you want to read some dark and ****** up **** then try Harlan Ellison's 'A Boy and His Dog', or 'I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream'. If that doesn't work for you there's always '1984' by Orwell, or 'A Scanner Darkly' by Philip K ****.

One of my favorites is 'The Cemetery of Forgotten Books' series by Carlos Ruiz Zafón. These are fiction but not exactly fantasy, though they do involve some fantastic elements. If you love books, you'll probably love these.

edit 'Ender's Game' is a quick and easy read, cool book, gets somewhat bleak if that's your thing.

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

WoT is probably one of my favourite stories of all time, and I'm very cautiously hoping that the translation to TV comes close to doing it justice. I've probably read the first half of WOT about 5 times.

Whenever a new book was due to come out I'd try and re-read the series, get midway through, then just read the new book.

I've tried reading Mistborn a couple times, and never could get through it, even though Sanderson finished off WoT.

I listened to 1984 years ago and found it really interesting.

I'm not looking for "Dark - you should be on a watchlist-dark", more like, just "not for kids-dark", you know?

(not saying your suggestions should have you on a watchlist or anything, just trying to clarify!)

  • 11 months ago
  • 3 points

WoT is probably one of my favourite stories of all time

Well then! Tai'shar manetheren! lol. I always love finding another fan of the series out in the wild.

and I'm very cautiously hoping that the translation to TV comes close to doing it justice

Meee too. I am cautiously optimistic, yet scared all the same. The showrunner seems to be a true fan, which gives me hope. I've been following him for a good while.

I've probably read the first half of WOT about 5 times.

Whenever a new book was due to come out I'd try and re-read the series, get midway through, then just read the new book.

Damn you're a hardcore fan for sure! When I finally started reading the series (after being badgered by a friend to read it for years), most of the books were already out. I only had to wait for the ones that Brandon Sanderson finished. So I've only read them all once, except the first book which I read twice.

I'm not looking for "Dark - you should be on a watchlist-dark", more like, just "not for kids-dark", you know?

lol understood! These won't put you on a watchlist haha, they're actually award winning sci fi classics of sorts, but post-apocalyptic, dark, and just unsettling in nature.

  • 11 months ago
  • 3 points

'The Wheel of Time' by Robert Jordan is a fantasy epic that will keep you busy for a very long time.

You've peaked my interest, lol. Gonna have to add that to my list.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I know you like audio books, I've never listened to them but I feel like I've heard the audiobooks are good somewhere. It's 14 books long; 15 if you count 'New Spring', which is a spinoff/prequel novel of sorts that was released halfway through the series. The average book length is something like 300,000 words. lol will definitely soak up some reading time. My gf is working her way through the series and just finished book 8; she's been at it for probably 3-4 years.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I do like me some ~lazybooks~ audiobooks. I'm going to have to see what publisher / narrator did the audiobooks. I've learned there are some publishers and narrators out there to avoid at all costs, lol.

14 books long; 15 if you count 'New Spring'


300,000 words

...tries to do some mathS

......

Gives up and uses calculator

......

THAT'S A LOT OF WORDS!!!!

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

lol yep! For anyone who wants a reference, the longest Harry Potter book was around 200K words.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

They seemed so daunting as a kid.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

If you want to read some dark and ****** up **** then try Harlan Ellison...

One of my favorite writers. He took dark and gritty to a whole 'nother level. A good essayist too. "The 3 Most Important Things in Life" ought to be required reading for everyone. Some humor in there too, like how he landed a plum job as a writer at Disney and lasted until just after lunch on his first day.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I've heard he was a total ******* XD but there is no denying he was creative... in a disturbing way. I have never read that essay you cited. I will check it out.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

It's in a collection called "Stalking the Nightmare". Might be hard to find. All of my recommendations on this thread are old, old, stuff.

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

If you want dark/gritty fantasy, I recommend The First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. It's not for the faint-hearted or young, though.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes! That is a great dark series. Reminds me a lot of the Cycle of Arawn by Edward W. Robertson in the macabre and brutal themes. Same warning must be applied.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I just finished reading The Mortal Instruments. I started it about two weeks ago and flew right through it.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Books don't last long with me either. I've been averaging around 10-12 hours of audiobook a day recently because I have nothing better to do, lol.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

It's sometimes surprising how much I can end up reading when I have nothing else going on.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I started this a while ago, but couldn't get super into it. Felt like it had way too much of a Twilight vibe early on. I've not read Twilight, but my wife did make me watch the movies with her, and it was not my cup of coffee.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

The Invention of Hugo Cabret is a great read, albeit, simple. I read it over a decade-and-a-half ago, so I must have been in elementary school at the time, but it is most definitely an excellent read at any age. Beautiful illustrations, as well. They made a movie a few years ago or something like that based on the book and it is quite good.

EDIT: Hugo, it is called.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

"The subtle art of not giving a ****" - it is easy reading and anyone 17+ should read this book- based on reading the first 3 chapters so far.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Good book.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Sometimes it's nice to break out of a genre for a little bit. Kind of like a palate cleanser when dining. "How to Fight Presidents" by Daniel O'Brien is good. It has a lot of interesting facts about past presidents. It looks at them through the premise that you traveled through time and did something to really piss them off and are now in a death match.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

LOL - now that is different.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

This topic has been moved from "General > General Discussion" to "General > Off Topic".

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

The cycle of Arawn and Cycle of Galand series.

Trust me, after 140 hours of audiobook you'll thank me.

The Spellmonger Series and Arcane Ascension series' are really good too. I'm currently listening to Free The Darkness by Kel Kade and it seems good so far.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

I didn't recognize the name of the book right away but I remembered reading Kel Kade. What I've read of Rezkin's tale was quite good, though I want to say it started off better than how it left off (or where I finished reading, I can't recall if I read all 4 parts yet).

I'll look into some of your other suggestions, thanks!

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, it's at a point right now where it's almost comedic because they don't know he's this cold blooded killer yet, and just see him as a guy that, to quote Tamm, "couldn't harm a fly."

Waiting for the realization to dawn on them. lol

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Have you read ranger' apprentice? It's not really aimed at adults as it is meant for teenagers, but it is a more realistic fantasy game of thrones-esque level of magic/mythology.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Hmm don't think I've read that one, though I believe it was one that I was checking out.

I want to say the last 'teen' series I read/listened to may have been The Reckoners series from Brandon Sanderson. It was ok, but felt targeted at a younger audience for sure.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

RA has a few adult jokes in it, but is mainly targeted towards teenagers. I lnow a lot of adults that enjoyed the books.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I mean I’m prolly gonna get downvoted to hell but Armada is by the same author.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Last book I read was the American Sniper book that the movie was based off of. Was a pretty neat read and gave a lot of insight into what the front line guys have to deal with day to day. Definitely an eye opener.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Do maze runner

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Armada by Ernest Cline was good.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

It isn't as "dirty" as A Song of Ice and Fire, but they were close and GRRM was inspired by him. I would suggest The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan. It is a fantastical fantasy series spanning across 14 books and will be soon getting a TV series on Amazon.

I would also suggest Terry Pratchett's work and Steven Erikson, but most importantly I would seriously suggest you give Brandon Sanderson's work a shot. The Stormlight Archive or the Mistborn series are absolutely incredible.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Dark gritty fantasy? Most of the "Thieves World" series counts, I think. It's the story of a town called Sanctuary, a filthy, evil-infested, vampire-haunted, magically cursed, crime-ridden, cesspit of a town. At least that's how it starts; after that things go bad. One of the characters is a drug-addicted mercenary and a violent rapist who kills prisoners for exercise and will torture a servant to death just to send the message that he's unhappy. And he's one of the good guys.

A second idea comes to mind because I just found out there was a Netflix series based on it. "The Haunting of Hill House" by Shirley Jackson, considered by many to be one of the best ghost stories ever. It begins thus:

"No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, by some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone."

"Titus Groan" by Mervyn Peake, the first book of the Gormenghast trilogy. I didn't finish the other books, but the first one is one of the weirdest things I've ever read.

"The Shadow Over Innsmouth" by H. P. Lovecraft. Interesting tie-in to Batman, since Arkham Asylum was named after one of the towns in this book.

"Neuromancer" by William Gibson. The birth of cyberpunk, and a good read for computer junkies.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you for the suggestions! I watched Haunting of Hill House and it was good, the rest of these sound pretty interesting as well! I'll have to check a whole bunch of the stuff in this tread out!

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