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PseeCarguy47

33 months ago

There are a few posts about painting. I'll make a small guide for those without much experience with painting.

First make sure you have all your supplies ready. Sandpaper, multiple grits. 800, 1200, 1400, 2000 I think these are correct. You can also but kits with the proper grits with the proper stages in mind.

800 is good for cleaning a surface. 1200 is good for prepping for primer 1200-1400 is good for cleaning between coats 2000 is good for finish work, wetsanding between coats and clear coat.

If you paint over 400-800 you will see the sanding lines (scratches)

It's also good to have some lint free cloth and alcohol to remove oils and contaminants from the surface before primer. And after sanding in-between coats.

Lay very thin coats starting with your primer. You don't need full coverage in one coat. Very thin coats are better. Allow sufficient time for each coat to dry fully.

When spraying, shake the can thoroughly before each application. After an application, invert the can and clear the nozzle. Before an application, give the nozzle a few presses to ensure even flow.

Spray from 10-12 inches from the surface, use a constant speed of movement in the straight pass. Start spraying before the surface to be sprayed, stop after the surface.

You will remove much of a coat initially with prep sanding until you use the finer grits. Spray and sand enough coats until you have full coverage. You should be using the wet sandpaper to finish the primer before color.

Begin the same process with your color. Enamels are single stage and do not require clear coat. Non enamels will be better with clear coat. Use heat resistant paint where necessary. Back-plates, Radiators

If done properly with an enamel, you will have a high gloss finish with final coats. Enamels can take extended periods to dry with final coats.

It is also helpful to heat the can of paint, primer, enamel with a hot container of water. It can sit in it for a bit before a coat. This helps adhesion and the coat will dry a bit quicker.

Don't rush your coats. Painting and getting a good finish can take days. Just be patient, the finished product will be worth the wait.

If you need to mask anything, be sure to use the proper maskimg tape. If it's too generic, you'll get line bleeds. Use the back of a thumbnail on the edge of the masking tape, you will see the tape got full adhesion amd the bubbles will be removed. You don't need to do it over the full surface of the tape. If you don't allow the paint to dry fully, paint will come up with the tapes removal.

Try not to paint when its too humid, too cold, too windy. As these effects can make it difficult to get a proper coat or good adhesion. Humidity will trap water in the paint and ruin a coat.

Allow your object to dry out of the wind and away from dust. These tiny particles show up in the paint, specs of dirt will create a fisheye. Spraying too thickly will create runs, or uneven areas. It also takes much longer to dry.

When sanding, be careful too not apply too much pressure around edges or high spots. A ninety degree angle of a case for instance, allow the paper to do the work, don't hit the edge with your fingers.

When wetsanding, use plenty of water. If the paper gets clogged, rinse or use a new piece. Best to not allow the paper to get clogged at all.

You will know when you have applied your last coat of enamel one the coat is dry. Or when to start with clear coat with normal paint.

Automotive paints are very good for cases but more costly. Most paints will be just fine. Except in areas where you need heat resistance.

As for an anodized aluminum part, you can sand to prep, the anodizing does not need to be completely removed. For a painted part, you can use the existing coat as a base for your new color, but it's still best to do some prep sanding.

If you need to remove paint completely, you can use Aircraft remover. It works very well. Do not spray it onto plastic, foam, or rubber. Those materials will get ruined. Use gloves, and safety goggles if need be. Or be very careful to keep it away from your skin and eyes. I will not be held responsible for the use or misuse of the product. User beware.

Allow it to sit long enough until the paint bubbles up. Spray your object with water. The paint will fall off. If it did not remove all the paint. Repeat the process.

If the object is clear coated, use the 800 grit sandpaper to break up the surface before applying the remover. This allows the remover to seep into the paint.

That could have been closer to the top but I don't wanna move it. Enjoy your finish.

Comments

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

How many layers do you usually spray ? Very Informative this +

  • 33 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks,

Two to three coats of primer depending on how the sanding goes. Initial work is more time consuming with actual work time.

Later work is more time consuming with letting layers dry.

An additional 3-4 of color with sanding also in mind.

Clear and be 1-2 coats but more if you wish.

I have done alot of painting over the years. But truthfully my most recent work had the best finish. Unfortunately the project didn't get finished.

However the process I describe is exactly the way I went about it. I was using enamel but I was going to clear anyway. I can say the finish looked as smooth as glass and appeared to be clear coated. It was black.

It must have had three coats of primer and at least three or four of black. I kept removing too much and it would expose an edge.

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

And people wonder why companies that build custom pcs charge 500$ for automotive paintjob..

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

Lol, it is alot of work.

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

Would it be smart to use a primer/paint combo?

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry I wasn't on here for a minute.

I really don't have any real experience with primer paint combo's.

That would be a question for someone else if they know. You can always try some on a test surface to see if you like the result.

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