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networking cables

tpaqui01

46 months ago

stupid question but i gotta ask, are ethernet cables and network cables the same? I'm currently using an ethernet cable from 14 years ago or close to that time and I would like to upgrade it to potentially get better speed for my computer.

Comments

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

also one end doesnt clip in place the main reason for the upgrade.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Look for those with CAT5e or CAT6 printed right on the cable itself.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Reading material at about tech: Introduction to Network Cables

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

It is fairly unlikely to give you better speed, but the little clip breaking off would be anoying. It being cat5e or cat6 doesn't really matter if you arent going for more than a few feet so you might as well get whatever is cheapest (most ethernet cables sold aren't actually properly rated so do t worry about it) im asuming we are talking about a cable terminated in rj45 (squarish connector with 8 contacts and a clip) as oposed to something similar like rj11 (like rj45 but has 4 contacts, ocationally only two of them will be used)

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

the cable is not an issue for your speed unless it is receiving interference from other devices it sits close to... which is unlikely... if you had the tool or know an IT guy with it, you can just replace the end that's messed up for $1 or less (depending where you buy the end and if your stuck buying a lot or find a single one for sale).

if you buy a new cable, get a cat5e or cat6. the cat6 is a newer and higher speed capable cable, but both are far higher speed capable than a home network can use anyway. the main benefit to cat6 is when your running lines over a very long distance, as in hundreds or thousands of feet... in a home network cat5 has been the standard for many years and likely will be for many more.

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

Cat6 still has the same distance limit at Cat5 does, approx. 330feet when used for gigabit Ethernet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_6_cable

  • 46 months ago
  • 1 point

what they don't mention is quality of signal over that length. cat6 is 250mhz and has a much tighter twist and usually better shielding. Its meant for 10GBASE-T connections and has a 250mhz rating. cat5e is 1GBASE-T and 100mhz. the cat6 cant do 10GBASE-T over the whole 100 meters that it (and cat5e) can do 1GBASE-T speeds at, but tends to have less crosstalk and retain speed and has less fall off over distance due to its higher operational frequency capabilities and the better twisting of its pairs... if your running cables that far, chances are good that your using business class equipment in terms of routers, switches, and network adapters, so your likely to actually run these at the higher frequencies... but a simple cable company provided router/modem to laptop or mainstream pc is unlikely to really utilize it as much and wont see much gain from the frequency (but will with the twisted pairs).

so ya, you can use cat6 at home, but cat5e is the standard still and is all you need in most cases.

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