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Budget Skylake Gaming PC for a Friend - Opinions Wanted!

OccamAsylum
  • 51 months ago

As you can tell, I already purchased the parts. I'm thinking about getting a low profile cpu cooler, but not sure that it's completely necessary. I'm sure the stock heatsink will be just fine. I'm building this for a friend of mine on a tight budget. I almost went with the i3-6100, but justified upgrading to the i5 due to the money I saved on other parts. This is a huge upgrade for him considering he's used to playing PC games on budget laptops and other titles on his xbox.

This PC will be used for gaming and web browsing.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/hpss99 Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/hpss99/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel Core i5-6400 2.7GHz Quad-Core Processor (Purchased For $179.99)

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H110M-A Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard (Purchased For $24.99)

Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory (Purchased For $42.99)

Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (Purchased For $46.99)

Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 950 2GB Video Card (Purchased For $139.99)

Case: Corsair SPEC-03 Red ATX Mid Tower Case (Purchased For $59.99)

Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply (Purchased For $59.99)

Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I 802.11a/b/g/n/ac PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter (Purchased For $32.32)

Total: $587.25

I will be posting this build sometime in the next month or so when I fly out to see him and build it.

Comments

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

Nothing particularly bad from what I can see, so my opinion would be you did well. I personally would have went with an i5-6500 for the extra GHz, but that's 20 bucks more expensive, and you already upgraded that from the i3-6100. Well done overall.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

I definitely agree. I also got $10 off on this particular cpu, so I feel it was a win either way. This is his first gaming PC, so I know he's not expecting a top grade build.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

$25 for a 1151 motherboard? Damn good find I will say. It is obviously the least flashy board, but for $25 how could you say no? The only thing is I don't know if that 950 will live up to the legacy of a lot of 950's OCing to be almost as good as the GTX 960 in certain cases. I could be wrong though. Overall, very nice for the price.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

I had a $25 Amazon gift card and it was 10% off!

For the price point it was either saving money on the CPU and sacrificing those extra two cores and going with a 960, or getting a better CPU for future upgrades and settling for a decent entry level budget card. I definitely had to make some tough calls between the CPU and GPU.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

I think going with the better CPU first was the better choice. Slightly less hassle when upgrading. So when your friend gets a 960/380/970/390/Pascal/Arctic Island card, they will already have a more than adequate CPU to accommodate the extra GPU power. The higher clocks on the 6500 would be nice, but the 6400 turbos high enough for that to not really be an issue.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

Plus better physics performance! I have a really hard time stomaching the idea of a gaming pc with a dual core cpu.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

The 6100 (especially paired with faster RAM) is actually about as strong as the famous 2500k (at stock). It is one beastly little processor for the price. There are however situations in which the two physical cores cannot keep up (such as with Crysis 3), but generally faster RAM (not allowed with the H110 chipset anyway) does alleviate some of that stress.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

I watched a few benchmarking videos exhibiting that and I was pretty impressed. Still not good enough for me personally though haha. If I was going for a $500 and under budget that would definitely be the choice I would make though.

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

Overall the build looks fine.

Just my 2 cents on the situation:

If you are building a gaming PC, going for Skylake processors on a tight budget is not the smartest of ideas. People are still running the 2600k processors from back in the days and maxing out games with no problem. The real bottleneck is the graphics card which needs to be changed often if you want to max games. Therefore Haswell processors are perfectly fine for gaming (future proof for another 5-6 years i think)

  • 51 months ago
  • 1 point

I understand where you're coming from and I agree to an extent. I've seen a lot of people use 4th gen processors (I'm using a 4790k) in their new builds. I noticed from builds I've seen, however, that they can be pretty close in price when everything is said and done. Maybe those are just the builds I've seen. I was looking to get something at a good value with room for expansion down the line as he sees fit. In my perspective 500-700 is a good budget range for a very capable entry-level gaming PC that packs a punch. This is what I came up with and I think it will suit his needs just fine.

And to be honest I'm paying for this entire build out of my own pocket by choice. He doesn't know that yet hue hue.

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