Description

My first build was a Poly 88 kit I built in 1978. This time around was much more "modular" and I didn't need a soldering iron. I had plenty of help, too, from YouTube personalities - thanks to them all for the reviews, tips and tricks.

Accompanying photos are in order of the following comments.

I wouldn't exchange the Corsair Obsidian 500D for any other case but I felt it needed a few mods. First, upon closing the side panels, there was a subtle but perceptible rattle. I applied Velcro to cushion the panel. Closing the glass panels now sounds more like the door of a fine car instead of a Model T. At the same time, the Velcro covers potential light leak through the vestigial keyhole slots (left over from a precursor model and used to secure non-hinged panels).

I painted the inside panel (it's the bottom panel if you lay the case down). The original black would eat the RGB lighting so I opted for a two-tone interior: white behind the motherboard and slate gray for the remainder.

I didn't want a long trailing front panel audio cable running across the bottom of the motherboard to the header. I ran the cable up through the grill of the PSU shroud. I'm not all that pleased with the result but the dark glass panels will hide it somewhat.

I opted for cable sleeves for those wires I couldn't hide and for the AIO tubes.

Heeding the warnings from reviewers, I was concerned about supporting my rather heavy graphics card. A coat hanger solved that problem. I drilled a small hole into the fan shroud. Into the hole I inserted the tip of the coat hanger wire that I had bent into a hook – making sure to clear the fan. I also bent a loop into the other end of the wire to prevent it from falling through a pre-drilled hole at the bottom of the case.

All those cables (especially the sleeved ones) were not going to fit the trough that came with the case. I cut an aluminum sheet to hide the cables and applied a carbon fiber textured adhesive sheet. A smaller panel hides the rat's nest tucked behind the PSU.

In the front, a similar panel hides whatever ugliness occupies the area to the right of the motherboard - as it turns out, not that much. A small cut-to-shape panel covers the unused PCI slots and I stuffed a string of RGB LEDs under it too. Under this panel is where I should have run the front panel audio cable. The final touch - I signed my build.

The remaining photos show lighting effects and combinations of glass side panels with and without the "carbon fiber" panel. The panel has a magnet taped to it which secures it to the steel case. It can be repositioned easily (or removed).

I like the look of the panel in place without the glass. I like the glass sides in place without the panel. I like the look without either. The glass is just too dark for both together. [BTW, the photos show the glass with the protective plastic still in place.]

Comments

  • 18 months ago
  • 4 points

This is a builder. +1.

Fine work friend.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks very much.

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

I like this. Has a nice backstory too. +1.

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks. It's all true.

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

feature?

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Whadaya think... HBO? Nightline?

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

Even better!

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build grandpa!

  • 18 months ago
  • 3 points

Grandpa??? Well, no likes for YOU! :-)

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build man!

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Great job. Nice description and look.

Thumbs up.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice. What will you be using the computer for?

  • 18 months ago
  • 3 points

For gaming. I've never been able to crank up the settings for triple-A games. If it doesn't do the trick, I'll just use it instead of a fireplace for a cozy romantic evening.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

I really like your attention to detail. 99/100 builders would ignore some noise from the side panels, but you DIY’d a solution. I think that level of perfection is where serious builders are headed!

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. It's not like I'll be building more of these so I spent a little more time making it mine.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Based on your knowledge, what has been the biggest change in PC building?

  • 18 months ago
  • 3 points

When I built the Poly-88, if it didn't work (and it didn't, initially), I got out a logic probe and a multimeter. Today, I'd get an RMA. I say that with no malice, no attitude because, today, the technology is so complex that it's the only practical solution. Back then, a component was a logic chip, today it's a whole motherboard. Back then, chips were chips and men were men....

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build and description! +1

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the compliment - especially from someone with a 5-build history.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

This is a great build but excessive for spider solitaire or backgammon haha... I'm oaf myself... 45yrs old for me... Still building and still gaming!!

Gamer 4 Life

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

You haven't lived until you've played spider solitaire at 4K, 144 FPS. VR next!

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Hahaha

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Amazing PC, that GPU I would kill for it! I myself only have a 1070 Ti......

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

I moved up from a GTX 780. It was time.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

It was

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Beautiful build, excellent cable management, attention to detail and no compromises on the components.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Are you pulling air through radiator or pushing

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

that GPU is my favorite one ever!! Nice choice!

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

how is the graphics card doing for u. i might be using it in my build. and what are the temps?

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

he is a pro at this 1+

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

More people should add personal touches like these. I recently fabricated a little column out of wine corks to support the corner of a terribly expensive GPU. Very unofficial & homespun but it's fun to know nobody else has exactly the same thing going on. Don't wait another 40 years to apply this kind of creativity!