Description

I did a completed build on this late last year, but have done a large number of small changes in the last three months that I figured I'd show the updated build.

The raw numbers:

  • AMD Ryzen 7 2700X
  • 64GiB memory
  • 9 disks, 26.5TB raw disk space
  • 5 gigabit network ports
  • 6 fans, 240mm AIO
  • State-of-the-art Nvidia GeForce GT 710

This thing is monstrous... within reason. For example, I could have gone with Threadripper, but for my home server purpose, a 2700X is sufficient. It's audible but relatively quiet, as all the fans are routed through a PWM controller.

All storage is encrypted, and the 26.5TB of raw disk space is is divided up as so:

  • 500GB 970 Evo NVMe boot drive.
  • 5x 4TB NAS drives in RAID6, for a total of 12TB usable array storage. This is combined with a 500GB 860 Evo SATA drive which provides bcache caching for the array.
  • 4TB WD Purple drive for home surveillance camera storage.
  • 1.5TB WD Green drive (old but still functional) in a front hotswap bay for detachable "grab and go" backups.

The motherboard has one gigabit port (ISP), and a 4-port Intel I350-T4V2 card has been added, of which 2 ports are in use, bonded to the core home switch.

This server runs Ubuntu, and does everything: NAS storage, virtualization, containers, etc.

Log in to rate comments or to post a comment.

Comments

  • 13 months ago
  • 9 points

pretty sure you can store a person with all that memory

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

What about all the storage

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

when your gaming gpu is used as a server gpu by everyone else.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Haha, sorry man. The GT 710 just happens to be the lowest (thermal) powered card with UEFI support, needed for Secure Boot. Looks like they're still being sold new, though I got mine for much cheaper on Ebay. Obviously if this were an equivalent powered Intel system, I would have just used onboard graphics.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

It's fine. My dad is planning to get me a high end gaming pc depending on the marks I get this year. So far, things are looking up for me. : )

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

You mean when your "gaming" GPU...

I get 32 FPS with that card and 40 FPS when it is overclocked. And that is just on Cinebench. lol

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey, this reminds me of my own home server. Ryzen 8 core and GT 710. Except mine is way crappier. Haha

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

It is nice to know that I am not the only one out there that is using a crappy GPU. lol

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

dat GPU tho

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Home servers are used for things such as:

  • Storing and backing up files for other computers on the network
  • Handling printing jobs
  • Hosting websites
  • Streaming local music and movies to other computers on the network
  • In general, running stuff that you don't want to burden your main desktop with

It doesn't need a better GPU probably because it won't be running games, or doing anything else that's graphically intensive. At most, it might be running game servers, which don't really require graphics power. So the only thing the GPU has to do is produce video output.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Good summary, thanks. Though the game server thing is counter-intuitive, so I'll clarify: For dedicated multiplayer game servers (which is what fn230 was referring to), the server software itself almost never takes advantage of a GPU; it's all CPU-bound.

I guess you could call a Steam Home Streaming server a "game server" too, where the game itself is running on the server and the input/output is being streamed to a laptop or a Steamlink. In that case yeah, you'll want to have a beefy GPU.

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

holding games on a network leads to ping issues

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

A few more notes in addition to fn230's reply:

  • Virtualization and containers; running multiple OSes and OS segments on one computer. I do a lot of systems engineering and software development, so it works well to have a number of virtual computers running all the time without needing physical hardware for each one. This takes a decent amount of RAM and storage space, though.
  • This machine is also the home's router, and can do more advanced routing and firewalling than you could do on a consumer wireless router. (Still need an access point, but most router/APs will function fine as a standalone AP.)
  • Power savings for the stuff you want running 24/7. Despite the size of this server and the number of components in it, it only pulls about 80W most of the time. That's less than my gaming desktop with a GTX 1060, which I sleep when not in use. If you have a less overkill home server/router than mine, you could even get that down to about 30W.