Description

Hello PCPartPicker Community

I built my first PC back in 2008 before I knew anything about computers other than "Dude you're getting a Dell!" The PC was pretty good, but rubbish in terms of compatibility and hardware balance/harmony. Thanks to both of these communities, I was able to build a budget system back at the beginning of 2015, when my first custom PC bit the dust. However, soon the "upgrade bug" was upon me. I spent the next year contemplating the updates I would do to maximize my Core V1 build. This is the fruits of my labor. If you have any questions or comments, please let me know. If I can be of any help building in this case, I have some good practice. Enjoy my breakdown of the key components below.

CPU: I knew unless I was changing my mobo, I needed a 4790K to max out my 1150 socket. I ended up finding a Staples online price match with MicroCenter and purchased this baby for about $280. It stays wonderfully cool given that amount of stuff crammed into the case. If I wanted to maintain the 4.4 GHz Turbo Boost clock all the time, the idle temperatures would be around 35c. I have it modular based on load to bring the idle down to 30c. I have only tested the CPU using Passmark, but came up with a 100% usage at 70c 4.4 GHz on all cores.

CPU Cooler: I couldn't find the actual part on the site. What is in my computer and subsequently in the pictures, is the MasterLiquid Pro 140. This cooler was very easy to install. Some reviews talk about the difficult to understand picture by picture only guide provided by CM, but I found no such issue. It was very straight forward and simple. The cooler came with two 140mm fans of which I could only use one due to the nature of the mounting options on the case. I ended up using the stock 200mm fan in front (since it still mounts fine) as the push and the included 140mm fan in back as the pull. Bother are connected to the included fan splitter and live in the SYSfan header. The pump is plugged into the CPU fan header modified to operate at 100% at all times via the bios.

Motherboard: This mobo has been wonderful. Even though it received praise from Tom's Hardware, it only garners a 3/5 star review on Newegg and similar sites. I took the dive and have had the board for over a year. First, it ran an i3 4160 and now the 4790K. Before you say, "wait you need a z series board to utilize the unlocked chip", you do not. This board actually allows overclocking on bios 1.8 (newest one I am able to install via graphical user interface). The board has enough power to do the overclocking as well. So, no complaints there. The only point I would dock on this mobo (and perhaps many ITX ones) is the lack of fan headers. It has one CPU and one SYS header. I had to plug the two 80mm exhaust fans directly to the PSU via Molex.

Memory: I don't really know too much about memory outside of it's compatibility with the board. The only information I have is that it works and Passmark says it outperforms Crucial 8GB DDR4.

SSD: This is my first internal SSD by SP. I own two external HDDs from them for over 3 years and have been very happy with the company. the SSD is working wonderfully and is very quick. It matches up well on Passmark with other SSDs.

GPU: This is VERY IMPORTANT for answering the "can this case fit my GPU" question. The EVGA GTX 1070 FTW is the ABSOLUTE largest card (width wise) you can fit in this case without case modifications (i.e. cutting it). You can squeeze maybe another half an inch of length out of a GPU and still make it fit. To make the second 8 pin PCIE fit, I needed to special order THIS part from Hong Kong. I might have been able to do this cable mod myself if I felt comfortable with electrical, but I am not. Even with this, it is a very tight fit. However, you can see in the pictures there is very little to no mobo flex after installation. Amazing GPU with wonderful temperatures.

Case: I cannot begin to praise the Core V1 enough for the ease of building within it. There is nothing more to say. You can take off every panel and get a clear view of the entire case. You can attack your build from whatever angle you want to. The case fits ATX PSUs, 120mm or 140mm radiators, large GPUs, and most anything you can throw at it. Perhaps with better cable management, I would be able to fit two HDDs and two SSDs instead of one and one, but I don't really need it right now. So, no points docked.

Monitor: This is a TN panel, but with amazing color accuracy despite that drawback. Tom's Hardware has an excellent and in-depth review of the monitor, which I suggest all current and future owners of this monitor read. It specifically talks about getting the best color out of it. I have overclocked it to 160hz and it works brilliantly. The user interface is particularly user friendly, which is unlike most monitors I have interacted with.

Comments

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Finally! somebody that understands that board! I don't even need to read the thoughts behind your other parts for this build. I respect you so much for getting that board. I currently run a AsRock H97M Pro4 and can over clock my i5 4690k to 4.4 GHz. That board is a beast, and I'm glad it's been treating you well too. I love the parts that you choose in this build as well. They scream performance, with a comfortable price point. And the RAM matching the mobo too?!? It looks gorgeous. Great job with this build man. I really would like to see some pictures of the case completely closed up and cable management taken care of. Other than that, Nice build!!!

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

I will get those pics taken and update the build. Thanks so much for your comments!!! I really appreciate them. The cable management is pretty tight because of the 1070 and the AIO, but I might dive back in and give it another go. It looks a lot better with all of the sides on.

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

I updated pictures with the closed case images both flash and no flash. Enjoy!

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

NICE BUILD!

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you!

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Oooooo... A fellow DasKeyboard user! I am loving mine how do you like yours?

  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

I actually really like it. My brother got it for me for Christmas one year before I knew what mechanical keyboards were. I really love the blue switches. It is a pleasure to type on for sure. I also like how it doesn't have a gaudy design. It is very straight forward and functional. About the only thing I am missing on it (which I could get out of a new one) would be backlit keys.

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Yea I have the prime 15 or something and the backlit keys are really nice.

  • 35 months ago
  • 2 points

Damn, awesome build!

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!!

  • 34 months ago
  • 2 points

Is this build First Time Friendly? I seems really good and other seem to suggest it is a solid build too!

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

This exact build would be difficult for beginners. Only because of the GPU size. You have to take off the front IO, get the low profile 8pin PCIE, mount the card with the low profile pin already installed, and then replace the IO in a certain way to make it fit appropriately.

However, if you go with an EVGA SC 1070 (or comparable sized card) with a single 8pin PCIE (not two pins), it would be really simple and easy, because you won't have to deal with the second pin clearance with the case. It's a very good case to work with and a great introduction into the mitx form factor. When I had my 960 in it, it was a breeze to build.

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

just that breif explanation makes my brain hurt

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry! I tend to get wordy. Basically, this is a very easy build aside from the GPU. If you get a GPU that is just as big, or smaller, but not the "super overclocking" capable one, it will be easy to build. Try a reference gpu or a middle grade one that has one PCIE connector. It should say so in the specifications.

2 x 8 Pin example

1 x 8 Pin example

*look under specifications and the power connector section

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

It looks like you have two fans on the opposite side of what the cooler is connected to. I'm assuming those are just two case fans? What size did you get? Also after some time using it, how are the sound levels idle/under load?

Also, forgive me, but I'm a little confused as to how you mounted the cooler. I'm only asking because I plan to do a similar build. Did you detach the initially configured fan and reattach it to the fan that came installed with the Thermaltake?

  • 33 months ago
  • 2 points

The two exhaust fans in the back of the case (blue led) are 80mm. If I had to change anything, I would get a fan management solution like an NZXT fan controller and have Pmw fans at the back. However, I have never minded the fan sound because I play with headphones. Even when computer is idling and i am watching tv, it doesn't really impact me. I have always had powerful fan setups though.

Ask away! No question is a bad question. The radiator is mounted to the case with the pull/exhaust fan mounted inside the case and the stock 200mm front pull fan attached to the case regularly. The fans did not come pre-installed on the radiator, so I just did the configuration that worked. There is not enough space in the case to do a push pull configuration all inside the case and still have room for mobo PsU connection. Hope this helps!

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

This is very helpful, thank you! Last question. I'm curious why you don't have the two 80mm fans in the back pulling air into the case. Since your cooler fan is pulling from inside the case and the 200mm is pushing that air out, wouldn't you want the two 80mm fans pulling air in from the back to have airflow going in the same direction?

  • 33 months ago
  • 2 points

I might have not explained the setup correctly. Air flow goes this way:

Air -> 200mm -> Radiator -> 140mm -> mobo + GPU -> 80mm -> back of case

All air flows from the front to the back. I know it would be best if it exhausted, but I don't have the proper fan filters to make that possible. I also don't have an issue with the temperature as is. So, i have found little reason to add more filters and flip all the fans.

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks so much for this. I was debating which direction I should have the fans pushing when I do my build! I might as well try the same setup you used since your temps seem fine.

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

Good luck with it all! Any other questions, please do not hesitate to ask. Mobo temps are always good too. I never see those temps going north of 39c. This case is a no-hassle solution and a simple fan setup. The one thing you might want to look into is a filter for the GPU side cutouts and the potential of blocking off the opposite side cutouts. Totally not necessary, but something I am thinking of doing to optimize dust control.

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  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

What game is that you're playing? Can't really tell but the mini map looks like it China and makes me wonder if you're playing some sort of new version of Romance of the Three Kingdoms.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

It’s actually Total War: Warhammer.

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  • 35 months ago
  • 1 point

The 1070 is awesome. After reading this Torture Test it dispelled any doubts that I should go for EVGA (with the whole overheating issue last year). I typically only go for the highest end card in the lot due to factory overclocks being as high as they are out of the box. As well, I really wanted a backplate for this build for its minimal heat dissipation and protection benefits.

One big thing you should think about though is the heatsink design differences between the SC and the SSC/FTW models. I recently found an article, but for the life of me can't find it again to link to you. It basically explains that the SSC and FTW models have a better heatsink design (along with the increased power connectors for better overclocking). I just think all around it is better to buy components that do not limit your potential. I mostly build for longevity in that regard.

Very minimal answer: Yes, I really like it. It pairs nicely with 1080p 144hz and even 160 to 180 in some games I play.