Description

My boss needed a new CAD/rendering workstation, but didn't want to sacrifice valuable desk real estate for a tower. She's transitioning from an iMac, so this was an understandable concern. I offered a compromise: bleeding edge performance in a case the size of a shoebox. She liked the idea so I made it happen! Enjoy my latest creation, Espresso Shot.

Edit: I thought I'd talk about my choice of CPU cooler in relation to this motherboard for anyone else looking to go this route. Using a liquid AIO is tempting, but I read the tight space puts unnecessary strain on the socket with all the tubing stuffed in there. I could overclock the chip if I added a second fan on this air cooler and relocated the M.2 to the rear of the motherboard, as the front M.2 riser card would interfere with the extra fan. This is probably the best cooler for professional use to choose for this case at the moment.

Comments

  • 24 months ago
  • 3 points

SFF FTW :)

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

Beautiful photos. A 8700k wouldn't have been a meaningful upgrade for the boss, so I think the x chip works well.

I'm sure she appreciates the NVME, low noise and no cpu throttleling

  • 24 months ago
  • 3 points

X299 has its advantages in CAD applications though so i think it was the best choice.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you. I'm happy not everyone immediately criticized my decision to forego the cheaper 8700K route. Among other reasons, we needed this built now and they were out of stock when I was ordering parts anyway :)

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

It was a bit more expensive, but for what she needs it for the X chip will do fine. Also I hope she loves the case!

The 8700k is amazing chip though.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice! Huge upgrade from an iMac, and I like the idea of using an X299 board for 8/10-core overhead in the future.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

That's my thought too - this CPU was cheap enough and this board has enough future-proofing that a CPU upgrade in ~5 years is a viable option. We'll see if we even saturate this thing's performance by then.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

People often underestimate a small build like this, thinking you can't put power into something this small, this is very well done. I can't see anything wrong with your choice to go with the 7800X, the 8700K were out of stock alot, and were quite a bit more expensive, which wouldn't be justified for the purpose of the build. That extra $100 went nicely into more RAM, very wise choice. I might have to take notes from this build for the future, since a compact build is great for saving space. Great job.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

Mechanical engineer here.

Why not a Quadro or FirePro? A GTX 1060 will definitely choke up on any large assembly with more than a couple of edges to render. At least in my experience.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

What program is being used in this scenario you're describing? I have never personally seen the performance difference Quadros supposedly provide in architecture's professional applications. For our purposes, a 1060 should provide comparable results 99% of the time. The Quadro cards just aren't worth the price hike in my mind for the work we do.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

I just read up on this a little more to refresh my memory on the issue. It seems to me that Quadros excel in applications like solidworks (which you probably use as a ME) with high polygon counts and lots of 3D complexity. For us, we're in 2D drafting mode 90% of the time, unless we need a rendering for a client meeting or a cover sheet. Unless we made the switch to Revit and started doing some very large projects, I don't think we'd see a performance difference.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

SolidWorks, Inventor, SolidEdge, and CATIA are the ones I have experience with. Do Sketchup and Revit utilize multiple threads / cores well?

The ones I mentioned previously really depend on single-core speed most. It kinda sucks. Nice build though, it's nice seeing workstations on here!

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

From what I understand, they will utilize all the cores when rendering. I'd have to do more research about how it uses cores for general program use though.

That is unfortunate, but at least you can use the cheaper mainstream platforms as they generally have the best clock speeds anyway. Thank you! Hit me up if you know anyone who needs commissions.

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

Just wanted to ask..Where did you get the case?? Nice Build..Dan

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! I ordered directly from the NCASE website.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Literally the most power for its size I've seen.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

This is beautiful.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

What type of CAD renders? Also, will she use Revit with this machine? Trying to figure out our next moves for workstations. Thanks!

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

We almost exclusively do Revit and Sketchup renders, which are CPU based. I offer computer design services for specialty workstations - hit me up if you need some advice or want to commission a build.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Which colour NCase M1 is that? Doesn't seem to be available anymore.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

It's the black model. I think the lighting affected how the color looks in these shots.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Ahh I see. It looked like a beautiful metallic brown colour. I'm considering a case, and want to get something aesthetically pleasing for a themed build, but all I'm seeing are black and white cases.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, it's hard to find something like what you're looking for. This is made of brushed aluminum or steel I think, so you could paint it in theory.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Glad I found this, getting ready to build almost this exact same rig.

Given the CPU-bound nature of the rendering tasks, why only a dual channel memory config of 2x16 rather than 4x8 DIMMs?

  • 21 months ago
  • 2 points

For expandability to 64 GB of RAM in a few years I figured. Do you think quad channel would actually decrease render times in any programs like sketchup or Revit?

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

do you have it plugged into 2 Ethernet cables? reason asking is that i got told that it was bad because you could end up with a broadcast storm. have you found yourself in that problem?

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Not sure what a broadcast storm is, care to elaborate? I think they ended up using the onboard wifi for this system because the ethernet port at that desk ended up being dead.

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

https://www.techopedia.com/definition/6270/broadcast-storm in a nutshell when the computer with 2 Ethernet ports, sends out packets of data, it ends up detecting itself because of 2 Ethernet cables plugged into itself. this what ive been told about.

  • 24 months ago
  • -3 points

An 7800x is an odd choice, the 8700k and ryzen 1700 are better choices

  • 24 months ago
  • 3 points

No ability to expand to 64gb ram or more NVMe down the road. Remember, this is a professional architecture workstation.

  • 24 months ago
  • 3 points

x299 is a better platform for professional applications with a much better upgrade path as LGA1151 chipsets are probably done really soon and x299 is freshly launched chipset and utilizes more pcie lanes etc..

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

no upgrade path with Ryzen 1700 or 8700k

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm jelly too. I wish I could afford this case. I already have too many good full-size components to justify the move to SFF.