Description

So, I work with large C++ codes that can run on cluster machines, so I wanted a workstation that could compile that code quickly (you'd be surprised how long it takes) and also have some of the high performance hardware found in compute clusters.

It has worked quite well for that purpose, I'm very happy with how it compiles and runs code, so I think the right tradeoffs were made in terms of component choices. The fans also stay very quiet even under the load of compiling (to be fair, thats probably much less stressful than a benchmark would be).

Thanks to reddit's /u/haekuh for the parts list, I would have had a hard time selecting these on my own.

The biggest snag was the motherboard, which does not conform to the ATX spec. It is missing a hole in the middle, and the case has a solid pin that goes there. I had to use a Dremel to remove the pin. So watch out for that compatibility issue. Also the CPU coolers are a tight fit on the dual socket, I had to mount one of the fans in reverse to get it to fit. The GPU is a bit big, but if you remove two modular drive bays it fits okay.

Edit: Apparently the center pin does unscrew, so thats my mistake.

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Comments

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome 16 core build! +1

I would love to have something like this for video rendering. :3 I guess one thing to keep in mind would be to get a case without pre-installed standoffs or the center guide stud.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Awesome build man!

From a fellow C++ dev that's still learning, what kinda code are you writing?

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

solving Partial Differential Equations on meshes. I mostly deal with the meshes, putting the triangles where they need to be. C++ is probably the best language for meshing, since you can have both speed and organized complexity.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

That sounds difficult. I'm not quite at the point where I understand how we use software to figure out mathematical equations and generate 3D structures, but I hope to be one day and I'm glad that my language of choice is good for things like that. I'd love to take a peek at some of the code you're working with.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey, NMF: I am wondering, aside from compiling, how well did your rig do running your meshing code? I am thinking of using the 2620 v4 instead of the 5820k for a machine I am building for doing CFD. Single CPU, though. Thanks in advance, GK.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

It depends on your code, really. Making a mesh from scratch is typically serial, though some codes advertise multi-thread capability. Once you have your mesh though, CFD computation is easier to multi-thread and many CFD codes should offer threading capability or MPI parallelism. Check with your code of choice on this. In terms of CPUs, a Xeon (like 2620v4) will scale better as you increase the number of threads/procs, i.e. using 8 threads really will be 8X faster. However, a single core of an i7 (like 5820K) will be faster than a single core of a Xeon. So, choose based on whether your code is predominantly serial or parallel.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, it will be used for parallel runs so I will have all cores firing up during a CFD run. So you think the 2620 will still be faster than the i7, despite its lower clockspeed? G.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Actually, considering the 5820K has a whole 6 cores with hyperthreading, the extra two cores may not be enough for the Xeon to make up the difference. At the end of the day, only running your code can tell for sure, but I had to make a choice the i7 may be a safer well-rounded choice.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

so I think the right tradeoffs were made in terms of component choices.

Says the guy with the Skylake 16 core/32 thread - 980 TI + 32 GB of RAM.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

lol yea my life is so hard

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

wow is it me or ES Xeons are flying off ebay and ppl are snagging great CPUs for cheap?!

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

that was recommended to me, but I got these new. If I had to do it over, I might go for ebay though.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes quite a lot of ES Xeon on ebay. You need to be quick. Because those are pretty new as well. Broadwell-E series which are at least 12 to 14 cores and up to 22 and 24 cores i see on ebay.

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point
Yeaaah! 2 CPUs, 16 Cores, 32 Threads. And cheaper than a Xeon 2699 system. :)

+1

  • 39 months ago
  • 1 point

Why a 980ti? Seems a bit overkill for what you are doing.

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  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

Python FTW!

jkjk very nice build! Hope all is well in coding!

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  • 42 months ago
  • 0 points

RIP, i'd love to learn C++, I already know Python but 10th grade has me tied up with all this work :(