Description

3dMark Firestrike Run (MSI gtx-980 4g) http://www.3dmark.com/3dm/11924624

Video of Cinebench R15. Crushing common CPU's like the i7-47## and i7-5930k; equaling stock i7-5960x.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsznsXH_4Hg

My main i7-5930k build in that video is here: https://pcpartpicker.com/b/4TTH99

Screenshot of results included.

Pictures: http://imgur.com/a/isKSF

Cheapest way to get a lot of multi-threaded CPU power in 2015-2016! I've done 7 of these boxes now. They are very fast in CPU tasks for the cost. They absolutely throttle my main rig which is a i7-5930k @ 4.5ghz (27x166.67 6-core, 12-thread) in video/photo editing, stream box (x264+multitasking), code compiling and large file compression/decompression/decryption.

In multi-threaded applications you will generally have equal processing power to a stock clocked 8-core i7-5960x! for 1/4 the cost of a running system!

The BMW / HP designed z600 & z800 are relatively good looking and very good internal routing. The Dell Precision T7500 workstations are also worth looking at & similar in concept. (Dual Westmere Xeons in a workstation type tower). Tho I feel the construction & layout of the HP z600/800 lines are far superior. (Thanks BMW!)


You have to be careful on the 4-6 year old power supplys. Test them well! I've had 800w units in z600's run overclocked, custom bios GTX-980 pulling 500w, and I've had 1000w units in z800's unable to run the same GTX-980 running custom vbios and limited to drawing only 180w.


The gaming tests / screenshots above are done on a an MSI gtx-980 4G.

Rise of the Tomb Raider - Default High graphics (vsync disabled) TressFX enabled, 1440p (Benchmark done in dx11. dx12 benchmarks the same performance +/- MOE with lower visual quality options)

Everspace - Alpha - max graphics (Unreal Engine 4 game)


Stream tests using xsplit. x264 CPU encoding: Slow profile Tweaks to enable HIGH profile and some features from VERY SLOW x264 encoding to raise quality beyond x264-Slow:

https://www.twitch.tv/toysrme/v/51657045 xsplit 900p 60fps @ 2,590kbps stream (+160 audio) Highlight from a stream 10h 27m 31:05s long. xsplit reported: 2,259,065 frames encoded, 0 frames dropped

https://www.twitch.tv/toysrme/v/51656193 xsplit 720p 60fps @ 2,590kbps stream (+160 audio) Highlight from a stream 10h 27m 31:05s long. xsplit reported: 2,259,065 frames encoded, 0 frames dropped

https://www.twitch.tv/toysrme/v/51291883 xsplit 720p 30fps @ 2,000kbps stream (+160 audio) Highlight from a stream 17h 42m 28.17s long. xsplit reported: 1,912,457 frames encoded, 620 frames dropped

For significantly less money; those results are well beyond the real-time compression that the most common CPU's for streaming rigs can achieve (i7-4770k, i7-4790k and i7-5820k)

Comments

  • 45 months ago
  • 3 points

I'm just wondering, but how loud are these things? +1 BTW

  • 45 months ago
  • 3 points

Relatively quiet. I've built two with Noctua NH-L9x65 and five with stock coolers (Not the "high performance" stock ones also sold on these machines for users that had the x5690 CPU).

The stock HSF are MUCH quieter than my i7-5930k @ 4.5ghz 's Enermax 240mm rad and twin fans. They control temps alright. Encoding video for many hours (maxing all cores) they will generally stay turbo-clocked bouncing between 2.98-3.13ghz.

The two systems with Noctua NH-L9x65 are quieter idling (and generally stay at idle until actual CPU intensive work is presented to them. AKA, not while gaming), but slightly louder at full-tilt. CPU temps at full load tend to be 5-7c lower, so the CPU's tend to stay turbo clocked at 3.13-3.19ghz at all times workload is present.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

OK. That answers my question really well. I was just curious because the pictures of the Z600/800 cases had lots of fans in them (Specifically picture 3. Z800?). Thanks for the prompt, concise, and detailed answer.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Correct, the top two are ram/duct fans. They never spin up. They turn very, very slowly at all times. Being relatively isolated from the rest of the hot air, they need very little air moving. The four of heatsink and exhaust fans are more obvious.

  • 36 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi Toysrme! I've just bought a 2012 Dell T7500 with dual x5620 (I'm thinking to upgrade it to dual x5670 soon), 16 GB or RAM (upgrading in progress too) and NVIDIA Quadro FX 4800. I've installed Debian on it and right now I'm trying to install Win 10 too. But right now I think that the workstation is not that silent, and I have to admit that I find it to be louder than what I expected. I read that you built some of them with the Noctua Fans & Cooler. Do you recommand this kind of operation for ensuring lower level of noise? What fans do you think is most important or smarter to swap with Noctua's ones? Have you got any advice on the model to choose? Thanks for your precius help and time!

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

The problem with changing coolers is that (for the HP z800/z600) you will need to remove the shrouds. Removing the ram-fans cause the HP to require hitting F1 to boot past the error (missing ram-sink fans).

The noctua ones are... Just as loud as the HP ones at full-tilt, but it's fairly rare in my experience for them to get at full tilt.

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

THIS IS AWESOME, I'd heard tales about this CPU's incredible price to performance really great to see a cool build off it. +1

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

lmao the inside of the case looks like melted transformer (which I think is really cool). How big is it? You should haul it over to LAN party, the reactions would be priceless!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Ya, the ducting work is actually quite nice. I've run two without and it's not that big of a deal, but it's a nice touch. You can really tell the difference between server/workstation designs and normal designs (even aftermarket cases).

The cases are VERY heavy. The steel chassie is heavy and the aluminum panels are very thick. The z600 is much more compact (Still weighs roughly 35lbs). The z800 (pictured) is roughly between the size of a large mid-tower case and a full-ATX tower case. It is smaller than my Thermaltake Core V71 ATX Full Tower Case in my main rig, but not by much!!! https://pcpartpicker.com/b/4TTH99

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

Awesome! You can get those CPUs for very cheap in my country! But there aren't any 1356 mobos here :(

  • 45 months ago
  • 4 points

Yes, motherboards are an issue. They are all proprietary also. Needing some engineering. That's why I recommend just using pre-built systems as a base. (HP z600 & z800 are my favorites. Dell T7500 also works).

For the HP z600/800 motherboard, as long as the revision of the board is correct, you can use the x56## series Xeons instead of the x55## series. That opens you up to the 6-core CPU's. The x5660 and x5670 are the best performance for the dollar. (Currently used they are around $100usd and the turbo clocks are a reasonable 3.0ghz or slightly better depending on the cooling). The x5690 is the fastest CPU of the socket (and a good 500mhz faster. worth it!), but not really worth the $300-400usd price tag for those on a budget. In another year or two, the higher clocked x5680 and x5690 CPU's could be a good investment/upgrade.

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

Wow! That's a big mess

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

Yup! Far easier buying / refurbishing your own ex-worskstation than worrying about proprietary connectors & wiring. That way you only worry about if the power supply is still good. If so; all the work is done for ya!

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Yea, you buy a SeaSonic/EVGA unit and you're done!

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

+100

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

We have a build with the same motherboard, and I am working on reworking it right now. Great piece of hardware!

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

Why did I have to see this, Im now searching for a z800 with x5670's, I can get 1 CPU used for £60... I want it now hahah..... can you run a gtx 970/980 or does it have to be quadro?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

You can run anything that will go into the pcie or pci slots. But as I warned, if you are doing the used OEM workstations; the power supplys are generally 4-6 years old already, probably in a heavy use environment.

I've had 3 z800 1000w and 3 z600 800w PSU's that would run an msi gtx-980 with no issue. I have one z800 1000w psu that periodically reboots with a gtx-980 unless a custom vbios is written with VERY VERY low power draw from the 8-pins + pcie rail and very low total TDP target.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Ah right ok, what do you think of dual E5-2670 versus dual x5670 (I can get them for the same price)? Thanks

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

the e5's are faster in multi-threaded apps. The problem with price is system cost. The dual E5 boards + everything for them are substantially more expensive than just buying a used workstation.

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

What mobo is that???? i wanna try to make this build so could u please tell me the full specs

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

The one that comes in the z800 chassis. The specs are what were listed: HP z800 chassis (which is the OEM case + mobo + psu + optical drive)

Two Xeon x5670 *note you can find a system with both target CPUs installed, one installed or you can buy the cpu's separately and ditch whatever CPU's came with it.

24-96gb of DDR3-1666 ECC (the z600 will hold 24gb, the z800 will hold 48gb. Double both of those if using Registered memory). Also note, generally the chassis will come with some amount of ram. (Today, it has 32gb in it. 8x 4gb sticks. Note that xeon x56## are triple channel controllers. not dual or quad. Pair memory in 3's for each socket.)

Video card, whatever you can come up with. Generally the Chassis will have an old, bad card. Enough to boot windows 7/8/10 and possibly enough for a workstation, but youd probably want a real gaming card. (If I'm not gaming on one, I use a cheap GT-730 which is about the cheapest kepler card you can buy with NVEC encoding). If I'm gaming on one, I'll use an MSI gtx-980 4G out of my main rig. (Screenshots gaming I included were all on the gtx-980)

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

I just bought a Z600 and am building it now. Did you consider the Noctua NH-U9S since its more similar in layout to the HP coolers? Your L9X65s, you have no regrets?

I am hoping to put in a GTX980, but am worried about the total wattage load with 2 x 130w cpu's. I am looking towards the x5680s. Can't justify the price of 2 x x5690's. I am also considering the 3.6ghz quad core for faster single thread performance.

  • 44 months ago
  • 1 point

None of them fit without removing or modifying the stock shrouds. The stock shrouds contain a ram shroud plus 1 fan (z600) or 2 fan (z800) which the motherboard forces you to F1-continue when it does not sense them. Also, the Z800 needs the main fan shroud because when you lock the shroud down; it locks down the lever that holds the quick-hold bracket for the PCIe brackets down.

I like the noctua ones I have, but you have to deal with the shrouds. (Quieter than normal + better cooling, but also more cooling capacity. When they spin all the way up they are louder than stock, but rarely will they spin up.)

  • 42 months ago
  • 2 points

do you know of any cpu heatsinks that will fit on the z800 without having to remove or modify the stock shrouds?

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

other then the stock one

  • 42 months ago
  • 1 point

No, I do not.

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Not that much faster than an overclocked 5820K or 5930K. Overclocked 5960X would crush it

  • 45 months ago
  • 3 points

True- but the entire system costs less than just a 5960x.

Also gotta remember that these are CPUs on the 32nm node, so I personally consider this very impressive.

  • 45 months ago
  • 3 points

$200usd worth of processors in a $500usd system in multi-threaded workloads crushes a HEAVILY overclocked i7-5820k/5930k by 14% in general video compression and by 80% in both 7zip and OpenFOAM (computational fluid dynamics). My personal i7-5930k is one of the faster builds you'll find. 4.5ghz with a 166.67mhz BCLK no less; fed by ddr4-3000 and 4.24gb/s read RAID-0 PCIe ssd's (with an xp941 m.2 for a boot drive).

VS a pair of $100usd CPU's, free ddr3-12800 ECC memory and a $35 used ssd.

Even with a stacked hardware deck + overclocking on the 6-core haswell-e chips; they don't come close when it comes to multi-threaded workloads. It'd have to be a highly picky workload (and even 7zip, which is very ram bandwidth picky doesn't make that up).

Now gaming, it's different. Nothing touches Skylake i7's at gaming (stock or overclocked). There's a big jump between haswell-e (if you play well over 100fps frame rates) and haswell/ivy bridge just because the bandwidth on the quad channel haswell-e plays a much bigger role at high frame rates. Bigger jump yet down to sandy bridge / westmere or nephalem. But that's gaming and not well scaling multi-threaded workloads. ;)

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

So is this a refurbished dell precision?

  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

That one in particular is an HP z800. I greatly prefer the HP z600 & z800 to the Dell Precision line.

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

I love these work computers no matter what company all I know is they pack a punch the guy at my workplace uses a dell precision t7500 that thing is a beast.

  • 40 months ago
  • 1 point

Would you still recommend getting an HP Z600? I plan to get 2 matched X5650 CPUs to use with it.

  • 38 months ago
  • 1 point

Have you ever made a build with the older revision and a X56xx CPU and made it work? I've sadly ended up with the older revision and that's possibly why I'm having posting problems. Although I've had it up and running an amount of times after BIOS updating, but it now isnt really posting, which could be because of the revision or possibly motherboard/PSU.

What are your thoughts?

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  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

Ya, the 5960x is both sides. Overclocked to 4.5ghz it's absurdly fast in multi-threaded workloads that don't need large memory and large core counts where the clock speed keeps it in the race with much higher core counts of many single AND DUAL socket Xeons! The rest of the platform does so well with top-end gaming at that price. It's the only thing on the market that can do both types of workloads well.

Honestly it'd be the best chip on the market if the OEM price was cut by at least 1/3 tomorrow. But a year and a half near $1000usd and requiring overclocking to keep pace with both high end gaming and more professional workloads. Nope! Deal breaker.

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  • 45 months ago
  • 1 point

The 5960x is NOT overpriced you get what you pay for.