Description

Hello all,

 I purchased and built this PC to fit my CAD needs. I wanted something that had sufficient power and a compatible graphics processor so that It could power Solidworks CAD and simulation. I bought some of the parts because I like to have the newest technology so that it takes the computer a while longer before parts become obsolete. I also left some room for improvement. I have left space for an M.2 SSD, 2 more graphics cards, 16gb more ram and more storage space as I still have 5 unfilled hard drive bays. I also purchased some aesthetic components including the corsair light kit for the dominator memory and red power cables. I after preliminary trials and some casual use I overclocked the processor to 4.3 gHz at 1.3 over-volt. As I understand that is not a very good overclock for 1.3 volts but it is the only way that I could hold the processor stable. I have never reached 80 Celsius even after an 8 hr stress test. 
 My overall opinion so far is that I am quite pleased with the performance. My previous computer had G-force graphics that Solidworks does not accept. The improvement in performance is astounding. It has only been a couple of weeks since the initial build but I would gladly recommend all of these products to anyone that was interested in purchasing them. Please feel free to ask me any questions regarding these products. Thanks for reading!

Nick

I have purchased several upgrades to this PC since the time that this was posted. I will update this with new photos and information when I have tried out the new items for at least a week.

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Comments

  • 57 months ago
  • 3 points

It is nice to be reminded that people do actually useful things with custom built pcs, instead of just like... punching orcs or what have you.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

To each their own I guess. I have never been one for playing games, but if that's what they enjoy then I can only wish them the best! I could't justify spending gratuitous amounts of money on a device to play games though. I keep telling people that it's more fun to make differential equation solvers but they won't listen to me.... I'm sure they are the weird ones in the conversation. Thank you for the interest in my build! Not too many people like the idea of a workstation.

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Sweet man! How do quadro video cards differ from gaming cards?

  • 57 months ago
  • 9 points

The acceptance of the card's drivers by professional software is mostly what makes the cards different. Solidworks and several other CAD programs do not support gaming cards. That, and they render graphics differently. The gaming cards work towards higher frame rate and pixel density of video type graphics while professional cards like the Quadro and the FirePro are more focused to polygon rendering. The professional cards are not nearly as effective to play games with as normal game cards (like the Gforce) that have comparable technology. Professional cards can be up to 10% less efficient on games. But unlike how game cards cannot be used with CAD programs you can use professional cards to games with. Many of my images that I tried to render on my old PC with a Gforce card would bog down and overheat my computer, as all graphics had to be processed through the central processor. This led to slow frame rate and hardware issues. I didn't have proper cooling on it though, leaving me to blame. Thanks for the interest!

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

So most people think that game developers for big titles use Gaming cards, when more likely they use a Quadro or something of that nature?

  • 57 months ago
  • 6 points

I am not sure what programs are used to create video games but it is highly probable that developers use professional cards. These kinds of cards are meant for developing. It just depends on the program that they work with. For example, Autodesk Inventor is a popular CAD program that can utilize many gaming graphics cards (example being the Nvidia 780). Solidworks will bypass the graphics processor if it is not an accepted card with and accepted driver (I owned the 780 and found this out). So while having a professional card is more beneficial for someone like myself it may not be as useful to a game developer if the programs that they run can make use of gaming cards. If they could, it would certainly be better to play games on a game card, because I assume R&D consists of at least a little game play. Professional cards of similar technology can decrease game performance up to 10 percent form a comparable game ready card. Food for thought. Thank you for commenting, I appreciate your interest in the technology.

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

If I were to guess, they would probably have test benches and systems for testing the games on, with 970's and 980's and what not in them, and then developing machines with things like quadro's in them for the workstations

  • 57 months ago
  • 3 points

That sounds like a reasonable assumption to me! If it were me, I would use the technology that can produce the games the best and the fastest. Whatever that may be at the time.

Nick

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

Sorry to chime in six months later, I only just saw this. I do a lot of SolidWorks editing and it's always been my understanding that the primary advantage for SW is that a professional GPU supports RealView. I've been using gaming-oriented GPUs for years, and not once have I seen my machines slow down or overheat, nor have I had low framerates or hardware issues. So I'm a bit puzzled what's going on, but I don't disagree that a professional GPU is a better choice overall.

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

What ever you took some of those pictures must of tasted pretty good, it being a potato and all. JK. Epic build though much better than what I use. Love the parts, well except the 900d.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

I apologize as I do not own a camera other than the one on my phone. I'm glad you like the build, it is serving me well.

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

You look like Chris Pratt.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll take that as a compliment! It's probably just the poor reflection off of the computer's side panel though. I'm not nearly Chris Pratt's level of handsome.

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm secretly Chris Pratt and I approve of this PC.

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

The secret is out now my friend! I'm glad that you like my PC.

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

Why a 900D? Do you have plans for a custom loop in the future?

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

I chose this case because I like having as much space to work with as possible. I also like having lots of internal airflow. I have a well ventilated work space that allows for me to add a large amount of intake fans so that I can push in lots of low cold air and exhaust all the internal hot air. And yes eventually I may decide to purchase a larger radiator system and maybe even a secondary liquid cooler for my graphics unit if I can get around to creating a nice copper water block. Thank you for your interest.

Nick

  • 57 months ago
  • 2 points

How much better is the H110i compared to the H100 and the Kraken X61? I love this build, it's amazing. +1

  • 57 months ago
  • 1 point

I can't be certain about the Kraken X61 but the H110 vs the H100 is all about how much more air is pushed through. This one is 113 cubic feet per minute and an H100 is close to 80. This is because the fans on the H100 are 120mm and these are 140mm. That's mainly the difference. It keeps the CPU cooler because of the higher air flow and the larger radatior. Other than that I can't think of any more differences. When you purchase a cooler just make sure that the case can fit a 280x140mm radiator. If it does I recommend this cooler. It has kept me below 40 degrees consistently unless I'm stressing it. And I have my processor overvolted and clocked at 4.3 ghz. Thanks for the interest in my build!

Nick

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

Why not use an xeon and a pcie ssd for your workstation. other than love the q

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello, The reason that I did not purchase an Xeon core is because of the hardware support from Solidworks. At the moment SolIdworks can only support 2 threaded cores in normal processes. When using simulation, element analysis, and flow/fluid simulation it can use up to 8, threaded, cores (these are facts that were based off an older Solidworks statement). Since this is the primary program that I will be using this machine for I decided that I would go with the maximum core count for its more advanced operations and then get the highest speeds. It would not be as effective for me to buy a 2.3 gHz processor with 18 cores when Solidworks can only utilize 8. So I bought a 3.0 gHz processor with 8 cores therefore I am utilizing Solidworks abilities to the maximum when I preform complex operations. Also Xeon core processors cannot be overclocked. This processor being an unlocked extreme series, was the perfect choice for overclocking and speeding up the processes. I have my processor currently running at 4.3 gHz and I have no stability issues. Therefore this processor seemed to be the best option. As for the PCIE memory, that is the next step! I wanted to start with a terabyte of memory so that I would have the storage that I wanted but I plan on upgrading my boot drive to an M.2 PCIE 3.0x4 SSD here very soon. Maybe within a week or so. Thanks for the interest in my post!

Nick

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

I see makes sense. I didn't know that about solidworks, regardless, that 5960x is a beast lol I plan on getting it with a 980ti and a quadro build (not sli) Thanks for sharing, looking forward to your updates.

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

I hope you enjoy your build when you get it!

Nick

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

Mistake me if I'm wrong, but I think this build could fit inside of the 750D

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

I definitely believe that this could fit in the 750D. However, I am an avid connoisseur of large cases, therefore the 900D was best suited to my wants. That, and if I ever choose to expand then I most certainly have the room to do so. Thank you for the interest in my build!

Nick

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

need pics of the guts!!

nice work dude

you liking the SM951 :)

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello,

 I will make sure to post new pictures soon. I am still waiting on a few of the new parts that I ordered and when I have them all I will update the pictures. As for the Samsung SM951 it is the fastest drive I have ever had the pleasure of owning. For only 100 dollars more than the 512gb 850 pro ssd, it is well over double the speed. If you have the “M” type M.2 slot on your motherboard and 4 PCIE 3.0 lanes to spare, it is a worthwhile investment. I have my programs and my OS on this drive and all my files on the other, and because of this opening programs and boot speed is phenomenal. Thank you for the interest in my post.

Nick

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Love the setup !

I am looking to build something good for my Autocad and Microstation needs too !

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

I' glad that you like it! It has certainly been working well for me. I hope you find what you are looking for when you build your CAD rig. Feel free to ask me any questions that you might have when you're building your computer.

Nick

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you Nsclemmer !

Il'l share with you my part list and ask for your opinion !

  • 52 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm going to wait for holiday specials

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello nsclemmer,

You're computer workstation is very impressive! I am new to the custom computer building world, and at work I am putting together parts lists for Solidworks workstations. One of our rules of thumb for components is to find the latest and greatest parts and buy one tier below, to get the most bang for your buck. I've done some reading up on different component reviews and such, but I'm still fresh when it comes to integrating all the parts. I'm wondering if you could give any advice on what parts I should use. Our company does a lot of simulation and large assemblies, so most computers will be fitted out with 32Gb of RAM and several of the more advanced ones will be 64Gb. Thanks for your time!

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello, For simulation ram is certainly your friend. The more memory you can afford to give your PC the better. I generally choose to have 32 GB and have higher speeds but that is certainly a preference of mine. Most motherboards that are new can support 3300 MHz and it is difficult to find 8bg sticks that can have such high speeds. For general recommendations I would suggest getting the newest interface on all of your devices and get your preferred components on that type of interface. Getting LGA2011-V3 vs LGA2011, DDR4 vs DDR3, PCIE 3.0 vs 2.0, etcetera. These are the types of things to look for when buying a motherboard. For the other components that attach to the motherboard, you can normally find hardware that has the newest interface and still have a variety of price choices. I may recommend that you go a step higher on your graphics card than I did though. In my system the K4200 is one of the only bottlenecks that I have. While it is a nice GPU, it is not nearly as powerful as the K5200. As for CPUs, look for high processing speeds instead of cores. I know this is hypocritical coming from the person hat has an octa-core processor, but if you are just using these for workstations, know that Solidworks can only utilize 2 cores as of the 2015 version. Other than those parts, most of the construction is preference. I like SSDs all the way around for speed, and I prefer to have large cases for convenience, but really this is all personal preference and may or may not be a necessary expense for you. You said that you are building these for a company and it is normally common practice to save as much money as possible, making some of the extras not completely worthwhile. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I will be happy to answer any specific one that you may have. Thank you for the interest in my post! Nick

  • 56 months ago
  • 2 points

Nick, I was planning on using a Asus Maximus VII Gene motherboard with a Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz Quad-Core processor. As for the graphics card, do you think the K5200 is worth the extra $800 over the K4200?

  • 56 months ago
  • 1 point

Everything seems compatible there, but you should note that the motherboard that you chose only supports 32 GB of DDR3 ram in dual channel. So that may not work if you want to have higher amounts of ram. The processor you chose is very nice though. 4 cores is plenty for Solidworks. It is a 16 lane processor though, therefore using a graphics card will utilize all of your PCIE lanes that your processor can handle. So if you were looking at SATA express or M.2 for storage then that is out of the question. If I were to recommend parts in the same price range with the same brand then I would look at the i7-4820K and the Asus X79 deluxe. This motherboard is slightly more expensive but supports 64 GB of DDR3 ram in quad channel. The processor is lightly less expensive but it slightly slower. Though you lose some speed it does have 40 PCIE 3.0 lanes giving you the ability to expand. And as for the graphics card, if you are only planning on running one card then I would suggest that you go up to the K5200. You gain 4 GB more onboard ram and you get PCIE 3.0 lanes vs 2.0 lanes. So the speed and capabilities of the card are significantly increased. If you plan on having more than one monitor or a 4k monitor this is what I would recommend. I plan on trading up quite soon. The less expensive card is not bad for Solidworks by any means though. If you cannot afford the K5200 then certainly the K4200 is a wonderful card and it will do the job. Let me know if you have any more questions. Nick

  • 55 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build, I have been thinking of upgrading my gaming rig that I built six years ago as I'm picking up sidework since I've retired. I'm wondering whether I can get away with just upgrading to the Quadro K5200 or even the K4200 and a SSD. I'm currently running an i7 975 extreme OC'd to 3.9 and get this... a GeForce GTX680. Believe me, CAD-MEP and Revit-MEP are killing me time wise. I've been thinking about upgrading the whole darned thing. I would keep my 900D case, PSU and watercooling I have set up though...

  • 55 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello, You certainly have some usable stuff there. The processor seems perfectly fine for CAD applications. If you don’t have 16 GB or more of ram, I would consider trading up to that first before getting a new GPU. However, you will see performance increases when you trade up to a nicer professional grade graphics processor. SSD are also something that I am a fan of. I love the speed increases that it gives me when opening files and programs. If I were in your situation, I would consider exactly what you were thinking. A nicer GPU and an SSD. Before you buy these things though, check your interface. You need SATA 3 (6gB/s) for SSD performance and PCIE 3.0 for the Quadro K5200. Thanks for the interest in my build! Nick

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

How are you liking the rendering and processing times of the 5960k? I just recently purchased one for my Workstation. Hoping it will be more than efficient for maya and zbrush.