Description

First time builder. I needed a home PC for 3D and 2D art production. I started by selecting a graphics card certified by my 3D software, and progressed from there. I picked the Quadro M4000, middle of the road for performance /price.

The case is Corsair Carbide Clear 600C. It's very roomy, which made it easy to attach the mobo to the case first and then climb inside and assemble the rest. Yes it's that spacious... 10" w-i-d-e from the front. This case is inverted, so I had to hold the mobo users guide upside-down during install. The case's clear door removes easily, and the back panel by 2 thumbscrews. There is a rear cutout in the back wall to allow access heat sync mounting support behind the mobo. It has removable covers over the power supply and drive bays, to minimize visual clutter. The case comes with 3x 140mm fans, and a fan speed control switch built into top of the case. After plugging my fans into the case controller I got very noisy results on the slower 2 of the 3 available speeds. After failed troubleshooting I opted to plug the fans into the mobo, and control them with the Asus software Fan Expert. All is quiet at various speeds now.

The motherboard is the Asus - STRIX Z270-E. I was considering another mobo for a while, but its bios would have needed to have been flashed before building to be able to use the i7-7700K. So I spent a little more, and got the Z270-E to avoid the hassle. Thanks to people on this forum that mentioned the metal tabs on the IO shield. There are these metal tabs on the shield that need to be bent back on themselves completely so that the shield will rest flatly against the IO ports.

I was a little nervous about installing the solid state in the M.2 spot. The drive is the size of a stick of gum, and uses the smallest screw provided with the mobo. I took a break and had a beer after that one.

When it came time to boot up for the first time, I powered up and… there was a LED indicator specifying a RAM problem. I pulled all the RAM out and tried again. Success! After that I tried various combinations of RAM in different slots. Eventually I found the right combo and all 32 GB shows up in BIOS.

When it came time to install win10, I scratched off the silver scratch-off stuff to reveal the key number on the sticker. But the paper sticker basically turned to mush obscuring the key code. I even got out my son’s microscope, only to reveal that it was totally illegible. I took pictures, got on Microsoft chat with support. After reviewing my receipt and the damaged sticker I was reissued a usable code.

The Asus boards ships with Aura software that controls mobo built-in lighting, and any components that are plugged into the mobo that are Aura compatible. None of my components [memory, graphic card] had built in LED’s so I was looking for Aura compatible LED strips, and possibly LED fans for lighting. I purchased 2x 60cm CableMod WideBeam LED Strips [Aura compatible]. I plugged each of the 2 strips into separate RGB headers. The Aura software shows only one controllable strip. Both work well, but they are unfortunately tied to the same color “zone” in the Aura software. These are great lighting strips and are held in place with magnets, which makes it easy to tweak their position later. They are bright. I use them as indirect lighting, positioning them so I don’t have to look at the LED’s directly. After I couldn’t separate the coloring of the 2 strips I unplugged one from the mobo and control it with a CableMod controller that came with the strip.

Thanks to pc part contributors! It was very helpful to be able to read experiences with specific hardware.

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Comments

  • 34 months ago
  • 2 points

Gives you an old "3-D glasses" vibe. I think the red and blue look really cool together. Also the part about the M.2 made me chuckle. I'm pretty sure you were making yourself paranoid about quite possibly dropping the screw because that otherwise might be the simplest installation xD the I/O shield on the other hand.....

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

Haha.... I kept track, I only dropped 1 screw during the whole build. Glad it wasn't that little M.2 bugger.

  • 34 months ago
  • 2 points

I kinda like that upside-down case...

  • 34 months ago
  • 2 points

just anew version of my build tho i have a q6600 and a fx 5600 which was insane at that time

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

How's the Quadro treating you?

  • 34 months ago
  • 1 point

Good. In my 3D app, just as I expected. No glitchy display problems, quick, reasonable render times. I've seen these in use a lot around as sort of a workhorse 3D card. It will be the first thing for me to upgrade someday, but this was a good entry card for me.

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

What would be your second choice or your desired upgrade on that quadro? My dad wants me to build him an upgrade and I've got pretty much everything down except for the graphics card.

  • 33 months ago
  • 1 point

If I had it to do over maybe the NVidia P4000, for maybe $100 more getting the newer "P" architecture. Dream upgrade might be the M6000 24GB, but is something like 5x what I consider my current price range, and price /performance I can't justify. BTW, I've been very happy with the M4000, running Autodesk and Adobe products.