Description

After living with the all-mighty FX-6300 for about 6 years, finally decided it was high time to upgrade my game/powershell-ing station - the White Horse, named after one of the best Need for Speed songs I've heard, by Goldfrapp

When choosing the overall design there was no question to go with white/black everything, seeing as my last build, a white NZXT S340 based on said FX and a 750Ti, had to be sold for multiple reasons.

If we were to go in specifics, the case is a sleek-looking NZXT H500i - chose it for the good memories i had from the S340, and also the built-in controller and LED's, as I knew i would want to change the accents from time to time.

For the base of the build, I chose an ASUS Prime x470 Pro motherboard, mainly because of the white theme, subtle, yet eye-catching LED's, controlled by AURA sync, and a well reviewed VRM

CPU - Ryzen 5 2600, cause I didn't want to pay for the improved stock cooler, that I wouldn't be using anyways, and frankly, just didn't need the OC headroom, kept cool by my all-time favourite AIO - Deepcool's Captain EX240, sporting the awesome looking tube design.

RAM time - seeing as where I live, all the usual RGB RAM options start from about 160-200 euros, had to search for alternatives. Almost went for some good-looking Crucial sticks, but found my now fav's - the Team T-Force Delta RGB's, finished in stunning white and a nice looking price to boot.

For power, a lovely little Cooler Master Semi-Modular 500w PSU, nothing really special about it, just had a good deal

Last, but not least, the GPU - an RTX 2060 by Gigabyte. This was a no-brainer for me - wanted the ray-tracing support in case it really takes off, wanted 3 coolers, and wanted it in WHITE, which, turns out, isn't really that common.

As for the assembly itself, I can't stop raving about how easy it was to do in the H500 - all the wire management options, little nooks & crannies for zip-ties - easy, fast, and most of all fun to do with my 3 year old. Also, being my first AIO, the captain had me worried at the start, but an OK info sheet, and some brainstorming made it easier to install. The only real hiccup I had was the RGB software for the GPU, seeing as it just didn't work - didn't detect the GPU, but DID detect the RAM...and turned off it's LED's .

As for the future, only thing I can think of right now would be to order some white or white/black PSU extensions, and maybe another gamerstorm fan for the back.

Now for the meat of it - performance: On Heaven Benchmark, 1080p w/ 8x AA @ fullscreen, Ultra quality and extreme tessellation, averaged 96,8 FPS with a score of 2439 On AC:Odyssey - Very High @ 1440p - 51 FPS 3DMark - Time Spy, with a a score of 7427

UPDATE: Did some light OC'ing - CPU up to 3.85GHz, +100 to GPU's core and memory. The result is really nice - Rise of the Tomb Raider @ 1440p with all maxed, except purehair set to medium, went from 65 fps, all the way to 81fps !

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Comments

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build.

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Great build, but you should've placed your GPU on the first x16 slot. It looks more aesthetically pleasing while also providing a boost in performance.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, was thinking to do it that way at the start, but the AIO tubes are in the way. Lucky for me, it turns out there's pretty much no drop in performance ( i think gamersnexus did a video on this a while back).

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

They did, it doesnt matter at all. Nice build!

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Temps seem pretty high at load on the CPU at 3.8ghz. Sure you have those radiator correctly or not too high voltage?

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

That temp was after 5 interburntest runs, was stressing it to the absolute max with a custom fan profile, pretty much the worst case scenario. While playing games haven't seen it go past 50-ish

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

It could be cause the fan are pushing air out of the case, i would recommended turning these around so you have them pulling air in through the radiator, should help cpu and gpu temps a little.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Check ScienceStudios video from May 20th about this oddball case - because of small intake at the front, it actually makes more sense for it to be push out, rather than pull in.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Just watched the video, thanks for recommending it to me I would have never guessed that, one thing though is that he never ends up testing it with a rad, just says that he might go as far to recommend putting them as exhaust but he doesn't have any data to back this claim, did you end up testing your self to see if it did have a impact on temps? Overall though your temps are fine so I wouldn't worry to much about it.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I had put the fans to pull in the air, instead of out, and did some stress testing, and, while the cpu & gpu temps were the same ( +- 2 degrees ), the inside felt a bit warmer to touch. Never went around to turn the whole thing around, with fans first and then the radiator, cause, frankly, I like how it looks in this config better :D

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build, have the same CPU OCed at the same clock rate, but my load is about 7 Celsius higher cause I'm using the stock cooler. Build looks super clean and I can now see why the NZXT cases are so popular.