Description

CPU @ 5.1ghz 1.340v Delidded with liquid metal, lapped die & IHS Thermal compound Kyronaut Ambient 22c Idle 25c Load 72c

GPU +175mhz core +1425mhz mem custom bios Thermal compound Kyronaut Ambient 22c Idle 24c Load 46c

System is 100% stable, stress tested with Aida64, Firestrike Extreme, Heaven, Prime95, Superposition, Timespy Extreme, Valley.

Soft tubing was used as I upgrade my gpu & cpu on a yearly basis. Considering I'm on my third 2080 ti after having to RMA two so far (1st one had horrific coil whine, 2nd showed a black screen and was dead) it was a smart choice. Much easier to pull components out and change them.

This was my first liquid cooled pc and after buying various parts and changing the tubing runs multiple times I think I'm finally happy with it. I couldn't find many people building a liquid cooled system in the Corsair Air 740 so I took it upon myself. Overall I was very surprised to see how well two 280 45mm thick rads fit in the case along with a pump. It's a tight fit but the build turned out very clean in the end.

Update 3/1

I had this posted before but since upgrading the cpu I wanted to repost and add to it. I wanted to show the process of delidding the 9900k & lapping the IHS & die. Temps dropped significantly.

I am now in the process of nickel plating a solid copper IHS from Rockit Cool to further drop temperatures. For people wondering why I'm nickel plating it instead of just installing it, it's due to electron migration when using liquid metal. Liquid metal will transfer atoms to bare copper over time and cause staining & etching. Not as bad as the pitting you see with aluminum but I want to insure the liquid metal will not degrade over time.

Update 3/7

Copper IHS was nickel plated & polished and is now being used in place of the stock IHS

Log in to rate comments or to post a comment.

Comments

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

My favorite case of all time. Corsair should really re-release it with tempered glass.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

I've been wanting this to happen since day 1. The damn plastic window scratches so easy.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Just released, the outside panels are different but they are tempered glass and the internal dimensions and layout is the exact same as the Air 740.

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Cases/Crystal-Series-680X-RGB-High-Airflow-Tempered-Glass-ATX-Smart-Case/p/CC-9011168-WW

Review from gamers nexus as well

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ik48WmrJrkI&t=651s

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build and parts!

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you!

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Only the bravest ones delid the 9900K. +1

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Haha I don't have A/C in my office and Michigan summers can get a little warm so every little bit helps.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

I have a video I wish I could post of me lapping the cpu die with 3000 grit wet sandpaper that would give people nightmares haha

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah, PCPartPicker doesn't support videos, you could post a picture?

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll see if I can take a still from the video and post it, might not be the best quality though.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

I posted additional pictures of the die lapping & polishing process by request.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

nice build. Really like where you mounted the d5. I got the same case but i used a universal fan mount in the front for the pump. Kind of wishing I had thought of thatmounting scheme so I could have ran a taller reservoir.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm using the 110 res from EK since both rads are 45mm thick. When I had the 30mm rad in the bottom at one point I was able to use the 250 res I believe. The pump actually fits in the space between the pci-e i/o and side of the case with about 2-3mm to spare, it's perfect, and easy to see if I ever need to check fluid levels.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Very nice build! +1. How did you get the solder off the IHS and CPU die?

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Quicksilver, it dissolves the solder. Took three applications total, about 10mins each time. Alot easier and safer than using the knife method you'll see alot of people do.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

10/10 one of the greatest enthusiasts I know.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Z370 motherboard?

  • 15 months ago
  • 3 points

Yes sir, all 9th gen cpu's can run in a Z370 board with a BIOS update. Only difference between Z370 & Z390 is WIFI & USB 3.1. The Classified K is one of the best VRM's I've come across for overclocking so I decided to stick with it. Once 10nm is released I'll move to a new board for the next build.

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

The Z370 chipset is optimized for 6 cores processors, and Z390 for 8 cores, so you would get better overcloking result on a Z390 motherboard. But if you upgrade you components so often I guess it makes sense not to buy a new motherboard every time Intel comes out with a new CPU.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

That's not entirely accurate. The only difference between a Z370 chipset and a Z390 chipset is the implementation of USB 3.1 and integrated WIFI support on Z390. Many Z390 boards are actually still using a Z370 chipset but with an added USB 3.1 controller. Moving from one to the other doesn't mean you'll be able to overclock any better. That comes down the the design of VRM on the board. There's only a few boards I've seen so far that have VRM's caparable to the Z370 Classified K VRM and those boards cost twice as much minimum. I paid $180 for the Classified K with a rebate and was able to get 5.5ghz out of a i3-8350k, 5.2ghz out of a i7-8700K and 5.3ghz out of a i7-8086K so I knew it would do just fine with the 9900K. It's ultimately going to come down to the quality of the CPU, my other i7's were great overclocking chips my 9900K is above average at best though. At best I could hope for maybe 100mhz additional overclock and it's almost unheard of to see one at 5.3ghz running 24/7. I've seen them pushed higher but mainly for benchmarking or record runs. I have a new full copper IHS coming tomorrow that will be be nickel plated that should drops temps 1-2c further I may try for another 100mhz but we'll see. Ideally I should be running 2 360's rads but that's for the next month when the new 011 WGX ROG comes out that can fit 3 360's rad in it comfortable.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

Here is a link from a very reputable system builder covering the differences between Z370 & Z390 in case you want to dive into it further. They are a good source for information regarding anything pc relating. The publications tab on their site is especially helpful.

https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Intel-Z370-vs-Z390-Chipset-Comparison-1231/

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Z390 motherboards, and the Z390 chipset itself, were designed for 9th generation 8 core processors, and although Z370 motherboards support 9th gen chips with a BIOS update, they were only designed for overclocking 4 and 6 core processors that consume less power and produce less heat than the i9 9900k. The Classified K is a good motherboard with good VRMs, but it’s still not meant to oc 8 core processors. I’m not saying that it can’t, I’m just saying that EVGA didn’t design it with that in mind, and Intel didn’t design the Z370 chipset for 9th gen processors.

  • 15 months ago
  • 2 points

You're missing the main points I presented to you with a reputable source mind you. The only thing Intel/Board partners had to do to enable Z390 to work effectively was take their existing Z370 chipsets(PCH) update the bios to recognize 9th gen cpu's (which is not a real 9th generation, just a refresh of a refresh of a refresh but still the same IPC & architecture), & design/enable VRM's that are more efficient. Again you seem to misunderstand what exactly the chipset does. The chipset informs the cpu of incoming/outgoing data through sata, i/o, thunderbolt, memory instructions, & pcie. The chipset has nothing to do with the overclocking ability. voltage is controlled through the VCCA, VCCSA, & VRM through the use of phases, doublers, ,A good example of this is Derbauer who has a degree in electrical engineering and is a world renowned overclocker showed there was no reason to move from Z370 to Z390 from a socket point of view. You mention that EVGA didn't design this board with overclocking a 8 core 9th gen cpu in mind. They did design the board for LN2 overclocking a 8700k, if the board can handled 1.5v+ while supplying 300w+ through the 8+4pin EPS they absolutely knew it would be able to handled a higher core count CPU under light overclocking use. This isn't meant to be an argument, it just seems the information you believe about chipsets isn't sound. If you could provide a source for your reason that explains this that may be helpful. I've linked the Derbauer video below as well as a source explaining a chipset duties and differences between them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMY-EEFkGVk

https://youtu.be/BOaVlnG2ENE

https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3313-what-is-a-chipset-amd-vs-intel-2018

  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

Copper IHS is getting nickel plated tomorrow. I also order a new cpu block from EK, changing the surpemacy evo out for a Velocity nickel/acetal rgb version. Also will be adding EK heatsinks to the nvme as well. This build is always evolving it seems like.

[comment deleted]
  • 15 months ago
  • 1 point

If I'm able to this weekend I'll try. Lets just say lots of zipties were used as I'm incredibly OCD about cable management & airlfow. I spent more time routing cables than actually building the system.

[comment deleted]