Description

Thanks for checking out my custom built desk PC. Please leave comments and recommendations. The table is made from solid oak stair treads. I used dovetail joints on the corners. After that, it was glued and clamped. I sanded starting with 80,120, then 220 grit sandpaper. I used an ebony stain from Minwax to achieve the color shown. The legs in front were made from some deck railing posts I picked up from habitat for humanity, while the back is supported by a French cleat. The desk would have been smaller if I had ordered a custom piece of glass. However, tempered glass that is 5/16" thick is about $300 for the size of a desk. So I went to habitat for humanity again and bought a shower door for $10.


Some things I'm working on fixing :

  • buying a monitor with a faster refresh rate
  • cable management ( a little difficult when the holes that are usually in cases have to be drilled.)

The white bar that goes along the back is an axle to allow the glass to hinge up in order for me to access the guts of the computer.

This desk took about 3 weeks to finish. Thank you!

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Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

You're quite the crafts man! i hope this get's featured for ya. i can tell you put a lot of had work into this.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Also don't hide the cables one once said "you shouldn't hide cables but instead you should make the cables part of the build" you could custom sleeve them, cut it down to the perfect size, then use some sort of way to keep them still (like maybe zip ties or something) that could actually look amazing!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, I really did haha. And awesome thank you for the tip

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm actually thinking of doing this do you have any tips?

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

I've seen people use MDF, which is like compressed sawdust made into boards. You could use that as a cheaper alternative to a hardwood like oak, but it comes with many cons (swelling, lots of sawdust when cutting/sanding, not as strong. ) You can also check your local thrift store for materials. Like I said I saved 290 bucks on glass by buying a shower door. If you just go to lowes or home depot for everything you'll end up spending way too much money. Also I cut the bottom out of a 1/2" sheet of plywood. I put the frame on top and traced it, then cut out the shape. This is a good method but remember to make sure everything is square before you start tracing.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

What's the diamentions?

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

6'4" by 2'3". and 5,11/16" deep i don't have my tape measure on me but its about that.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

I really need to work on my joinery skills, awesome desk made me rethink my current design plans. Really great build mate well done.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

thank you sir

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

These builds always are amazing to look at. Your build is no exception, and hope you enjoy it!

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

thank you!

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Furniture PC is a style I still want to try. Is it a lot harder to cut a shower door than regular window or mirror glass?

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

it is almost impossible to cut tempered glass, which is what i have. because it wants to just shatter. the dimensions of this desk were built around the dimensions of the shower door

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I see, they must do it with a water jet or something in a factory. Well I'd be happy with that size of a desktop, and looking for more ways to gear up the interior space.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

No, the factory custom makes each tempered glass like that

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah I left alot of open space. Probably for a custom loop and more hard drives for home security later on