Description

This was my first ever pc build from the ground up. I wanted to build a solid foundation with a good motherboard and slowly upgrade all other components over time to keep it budget friendly. The initial build had a G3220 cpu with the stock cooler (integrated graphics FTW), 2x4gb sticks of corsair memory, 240gb OCZ ssd, cx430 psu, plus I harvested the 1tb hdd and a dvd drive from my old pc.

This sufficed for a while and I began to upgrade as money became available: 2 more 4gb sticks of memory, more fans, the best cpu for this socket (4790k), an AIO watercooler, and finally a gtx1060. Fitting the AIO was tricky as the case didn't allow enough room above the motherboard for a radiator and fans. My solution was to pull out the drive bays, stick the AIO in the front of the case, and place my ssd/hdd into a Flex Fit Trio which is a 5.25 drive bay conversion with room for an hdd and 2 ssd.

This rig has come a long way and it is amazingly powerful, I mostly use it for music editing, gaming, video editing, CAD, and web surfing. Of course a large library of games, music, and productivity files starts to eat up that 1tb drive fast so I added in a 250gb mSATA drive for some additional space while I contemplate how to split the rig into 2 separate pcs. One will become a productivity workstation with a raid library for file storage and the other a console/htpc for my living room.

I hope you enjoyed. :)

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Comments

  • 30 months ago
  • 2 points

Hey Justin, I was wondering why you got a i7 processor and then decided to go with a 1060. Also why didn't you just get a 500gb ssd instead of one 250gb and one 240gb. No offense, just constructive criticism. :)))

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

The 1060 is already a huge leap up from the intel integrated graphics I was using, and I felt the 1080 wasn't worth double the price for the small performance gains. However I needed the i7 to run CAD software and other intensive workstation applications. Plus I wanted to max out the socket so I would never need another chip for the motherboard, but new gpus will continue to fit the mobo until they change the pcie slot configuration.

As for the 2 smaller ssd instead of 1 big one, well I like to keep my OS on a dedicated drive and this allows me to split these drives into separate rigs in the future. If I wanted one logical drive I could always set the 2 drives up as a RAID0 and double the speed but the OS would recognize it as one large drive.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

In terms of the 2 separate drives, Couldn't you have got a 500gb ssd and partitioned it? Great build, just wondering

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

2 drives gives more flexibility, I can use them in RAID0 and double the speed, I can use them in RAID1 and the OS sees them as 1 logical drive or I can split them up and use them in 2 different rigs. :)

  • 30 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice, thanks for responding as this explanation makes a lot of sense and is something I hadn't thought of at the time!

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build man. Those fans on top should both be exhaust by the way for optimal airflow, but otherwise its a clean build.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you. I agree the airflow isn't optimal but I needed more intake fans to keep the case in a positive pressure state, this forces dust out of the case and keeps it nice and clean. Also I'm not worried about hot air "collecting" at the top of the case since the cpu is cooled from the front AIO, and the fans move a sufficient amount of air across the memory and vrm heatsinks so they never get hot.

The next case I get will have more fan locations so I'll be doing exactly what you're suggesting :)

  • 27 months ago
  • 1 point

Justin i have the same case and gpu and same socket for cpu lol. i kinda wanna copy ur build can u send more detailed pictures or even video

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey Justin just wondering what kind of temps your pulling under loads with that cooler have the same case thinking about going this route after seeing what you did

Ps

awesome build !!

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Normally about 60c but it's highly dependent on the cpu, the voltage, what tasks you're doing to create a load and exactly what fans you're using against the radiator. Having the h100iv2 as an intake rather than an exhaust helped keep the cpu cool but it will dump hot air into the path of the gpu. I was happy with the results but keep that in mind :)

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not sure if you will respond giving how long ago this was posted but: When you removed the drive cage where did you put the storage drives?

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

I have this case and the only other spot it could go is that top 5.25 slot / above the CD/DVD drive.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Just above my dvd drive, I used a 5.25" bay conversion called Icy Dock F​lex-Fit Tr​io which fits up to 1hdd and 2ssd at the same time.

  • 25 months ago
  • 1 point

Oh, interesting :)

  • 26 months ago
  • 1 point

Any issues with AIO cooler in the front of your case?

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

No issues after removing the drive bays.

  • 25 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks for the reply. I went ahead and picked up a masterliquid lite 240 and I was able to fit it in the same case. Just had to take the drive bays out as well :)

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Justin

I just tried to update a Z87-G45 from an I5 4670 to i7 4790 with no luck - would not even post. I did use MSI live to update the bios to 1.9

Did you do anything beyond that to get the I7 to function ? thanks

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

I also used MSI live update to go to bios 1.9 for the 4790k. It just worked, nothing special required. Maybe there is an erroneous setting in the bios after flashing, did you try clearing the cmos with the power cable unplugged from the wall? Alternatively you could try to exclude the 4790 cpu variable by reinstalling the older i5 cpu. If you had a power loss in the middle of flashing the bios it could permanently brick the bios chip on the motherboard. I don't believe there is a way to recover from a bricked bios on that board other than RMA through MSI.

I do want to mention though, if you already had the 4670 working on the board then it should've had a new enough bios to run the 4790 since they're both 4th gen cpus.